News / Science & Technology

NASA Looks to the Future, Back at its Past

The eight newest members of NASA's 2013 Astronaut Class.
The eight newest members of NASA's 2013 Astronaut Class.
Rick Pantaleo
NASA administrator Charles Bolden formally introduced the space agency’s eight new astronaut candidates at the Johnson Space Center in Houston on Wednesday.

The eight men and women who were picked by NASA to join the Astronaut Corps were chosen from more than 6,100 applicants after a rigorous selection process.

The new astronauts introduced by Bolden are Josh A. Cassada and Victor J. Glover, both lieutenant commanders in the U.S. Navy; Tyler N. "Nick" Hague, a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force; Christina M. Hammock; Nicole Aunapu Mann, a major in the U.S. Marine Corps; Anne C. McClain and Andrew R. Morgan, both majors in the U.S. Army; and Jessica U. Meir.

“They not only have the right stuff…they represent the full tapestry of America,” Bolden said.  “These next generation of explorers will be among those who plan and carry out the first human missions to an asteroid or on to Mars. Their journey begins now, and the nation will be right beside them reaching for the stars.”

The new astronauts have a challenging future ahead of them.  NASA says that they will be among those who will be able to fly on the new commercial space transportation systems that are being developed and perhaps will carry out the first-ever human missions to an asteroid and Mars.

After introducing the new astronauts, representing the future of NASA – Bolden talked about future space exploration plans.
 
Bolden spoke of the updated Global Exploration Roadmap (GER), an international effort developed by NASA and 11 other space agencies from around the world that share a global vision of space exploration.  Among some of the ambitious plans laid out in the GER are said to include the following:


While the space agency outlined its future today, it also is addressing its past. Officials at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida announced that they are looking for ideas on what to do with three of its historic mobile launch platforms that NASA no longer needs.

A mobile launch platform is taken to the launch pad by a NASA crawler-transporter.A mobile launch platform is taken to the launch pad by a NASA crawler-transporter.
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A mobile launch platform is taken to the launch pad by a NASA crawler-transporter.
A mobile launch platform is taken to the launch pad by a NASA crawler-transporter.
The space agency is thinking that perhaps some privately owned space companies could use the old launch facilities for their own commercial launch activity, non-space related private companies could repurpose the facilities for their own needs, or they could be used in other ways to benefit the public or environment.

The three mobile launch platforms NASA is looking to sell or lease include those that were used to hold Saturn rockets, which made their way to the moon as well as space shuttles whose program came to an end in 2011.

NASA described these launch platforms as two-story, steel structures that are almost 8 meters tall, 50 meters long, 41 meters wide and weigh around 4 kilotons.

The space agency added that each of the platforms feature a number of pathways, compartments and plumbing and electrical cabling systems.

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by: Babu G. Ranganathan from: Pennsylvania
August 23, 2013 9:10 AM
SCIENCE SHOWS THAT THE UNIVERSE CANNOT BE ETERNAL because it could not have sustained itself eternally due to the law of entropy (increasing energy decay, even in an open system). Einstein showed that space, matter, and time all are physical and all had a beginning. Space even produces particles because it’s actually something, not nothing. Even time had a beginning! Time is not eternal. Popular atheistic scientist Stephen Hawking admits that the universe came from nothing but he believes that nothing became something by a natural process yet to be discovered. That's not rational thinking at all, and it also would be making the effect greater than its cause to say that nothing created something. The beginning had to be of supernatural origin because natural laws and processes do not have the ability to bring something into existence from nothing. What about the Higgs boson (the so-called “God Particle”)? The Higgs boson does not create mass from nothing, but rather it converts energy into mass. Einstein showed that all matter is some form of energy.

The supernatural cannot be proved by science but science points to a supernatural intelligence and power for the origin and order of the universe. Where did God come from? Obviously, unlike the universe, God’s nature doesn’t require a beginning. EXPLAINING HOW AN AIRPLANE WORKS doesn't mean no one made the airplane. Explaining how life or the universe works doesn't mean there was no Maker behind them. Natural laws may explain how the order in the universe works and operates, but mere undirected natural laws cannot explain the origin of that order. Once you have a complete and living cell then the genetic code and biological machinery exist to direct the formation of more cells, but how could life or the cell have naturally originated when no directing code and mechanisms existed in nature? Read my Internet article: HOW FORENSIC SCIENCE REFUTES ATHEISM.

WHAT IS SCIENCE? Science simply is knowledge based on observation. No one observed the universe coming by chance or by design, by creation or by evolution. These are positions of faith. The issue is which faith the scientific evidence best supports. Visit my newest Internet site: THE SCIENCE SUPPORTING CREATION
Babu G. Ranganathan* (B.A. Bible/Biology) Author of popular Internet article, TRADITIONAL DOCTRINE OF HELL EVOLVED FROM GREEK ROOTS,
recognized in the 24th edition of Marquis "Who's Who in The East" for writings on religion and science.

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