News / Europe

NATO Boosts Presence in Eastern Europe as Turmoil Continues in Ukraine

NATO Boosts Presence In Eastern Europe Amid Continued Turmoil In Ukrainei
X
April 30, 2014 10:24 AM
Turmoil in eastern Ukraine continued Tuesday, a day after the United States and Europe announced new sanctions against Russia for failing to take steps to de-escalate the crisis in its neighbor to the west. Pro-Russian demonstrators in the Ukrainian city of Luhansk seized government buildings and the local television center. Zlatica Hoke has more.

NATO Boosts Presence In Eastern Europe Amid Continued Turmoil In Ukraine

Zlatica Hoke
— Turmoil in eastern Ukraine continued Tuesday, a day after the United States and Europe announced new sanctions against Russia for failing to take steps to de-escalate the crisis in its neighbor to the west. Pro-Russian demonstrators in the Ukrainian city of Luhansk seized government buildings and the local television center, after similar actions in Donetsk and Slovyansk. NATO is boosting defense in member nations bordering Russia to allay their growing concerns about Moscow's territorial ambitions. 
 
Several thousand protesters stormed the regional administration building in Luhansk Tuesday after a group of youths broke windows with metal bars and let the crowd in. The rebels replaced the Ukrainian flag with a Russian one, while riot police stood by.
 
In the capital, Kyiv, acting president Oleksander Turchynov lashed out at the country's law enforcement for failing to act.
 
"The overwhelming majority of law enforcement bodies in the east are incapable of fulfilling their duties to defend our citizens. New heads of the Security Service of Ukraine have already been appointed in Donetsk and Luhansk [eastern Ukraine]. The leadership of the special forces "Alpha" has been totally replaced," said Turchynov.
 
Ukraine and its allies have accused Russia of fueling the crisis in eastern Ukraine to clear the way for another incursion into the region after annexing the Crimean peninsula. NATO member nations bordering Russia have asked the alliance for additional protection.
 
Deputy Supreme Allied Commander in Europe Adrian Bradshaw visited Latvia Tuesday to discuss measures to strengthen NATO's presence in the Baltic region.
 
"Our judgment is that the actions that we've taken at the moment are proportional and appropriate to the changed security dynamic that we face.  It gives a very clear indication on NATO commitment to the region, but the things we are doing could not be considered threatening to anybody outside the region," said Bradshaw.
 
NATO already has increased its air policing and naval presence in the Baltics. Last week, 450 U.S. paratroopers were deployed in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, and another 150 in Poland. NATO military exercises are taking place across the region.
 
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry Tuesday said NATO is sending a clear message to Moscow that its territory is inviolable.  He also called on NATO members to meet their financial obligations.
 
“We cannot continue to allow allied defense budgets to shrink. Clearly, not all allies are going to meet the NATO benchmark of 2 percent of GDP overnight, or even next year.  But it’s time for allies who are below that benchmark to make credible commitments to increase their spending on defense over the next five years, and if we’re going to move the trend line in a positive direction, this has to be an alliance-wide effort,” said Kerry.
 
Russia has accused the West of stirring unrest in the region, but some eastern Europeans who still recall Russian invasions say they feel safer with an increased NATO presence. Lithuanian student Ernestas Tuzinas said he wants even more.
 
"These are only the first steps. NATO should set up a permanent military base in Lithuania," said Tuzinas. 
 
The Baltic states spent five decades under Soviet occupation until 1991 and joined NATO in 2004. Poland joined in 1999 and was among the first eastern European NATO members.

You May Like

Uganda Court Annuls Anti-Gay Law

Court says law was passed in parliament without enough members present for a full quorum More

Multimedia Thailand Makes Efforts to Improve Conditions for Migrant Laborers

In Thailand, its not uncommon for parents to bring their children to work; one company, in-collaboration with other organizations, address safety concerns More

In Indonesia, Jihad Video Raises Concern

Video calls on Indonesians to join Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, ISIL More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: johan mann from: Europe
May 01, 2014 1:32 PM
It's time for US and other NATO members to stop the thugs from the Kremlin and teach that wanna be Czar Putin a lesson he'll never forget.His next target is Transnistria.


by: Juli from: Pekanbaru, Indonesia
April 30, 2014 6:01 AM
I think crisis in Ukraine must be finished with Peace. So that, we can start again with friendly together.


by: Rob from: Italy
April 30, 2014 5:57 AM
If EU and USA don't take much more than these ridiculous sanctions on Russia,in one year or two they will be sorry to miss this moment.


by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey
April 30, 2014 1:27 AM
The US, the EU, the UK and NATO need to stop this Putin and his terrorist group. We are living in a modern world, such thing should not be condone. Mr. Putin has a responsibility on the security council. and if he is doing such thing, what can he tell other countries? enough of Mr. Putin aggression and we must bring this to an end.We need more of US and it allied presence in eastern Ukraine. Mr.Obama may be a man of diplomacy , but if the US has to fight, Mr.Obama will fight. So Mr. Putin is sitting on a time bomb. Mr. Putin is an enemy to the peace of this world, and he is an enemy to progress. The world needs to hear the cry of the Ukrainian people. Enough is really enough. How long are we going to sit back and allow Mr. Putin to destroy the people country? The US, EU and the UK needs to teach Mr. Putin a hard lesson.God Bless the United States

In Response

by: Anonymous
April 30, 2014 7:18 PM
Absolutely correct, he is a criminal in fact. Also look what he did in Chechnya, Moscow Theater Siege, Georgia, Syria, and now Ukraine.

Enough is enough, and the world should not be afraid to slap that ass with sanctions through the nose. Sooner or later the people of Russia will overthrow him because he has no interests that favor the Russian peoples future. The Russian people do not want or need sanctions, however Putin would be unscathed if they were applied so they do not affect him personally.

Throw Putin out.

In Response

by: Anonymous
April 30, 2014 6:01 AM
Do you really believe in Putin's terrorist groups in eastern Ukraine? Don't read VOA and watch American TV. Where have you heard the cry of the Ukrainian people? They cry: "Putin, help us!"

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
In Thailand, Some Efforts to Improve Conditions For Migrant Laborersi
X
Steve Herman
August 01, 2014 6:22 PM
Thailand has been facing increasing international scrutiny as a hub of human trafficking and slave labor. Some of the kingdom’s companies are striving to improve working conditions, especially for the millions of migrant laborers from surrounding countries. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman in Bangkok takes a look at one initiative for children at construction sites
Video

Video In Thailand, Some Efforts to Improve Conditions For Migrant Laborers

Thailand has been facing increasing international scrutiny as a hub of human trafficking and slave labor. Some of the kingdom’s companies are striving to improve working conditions, especially for the millions of migrant laborers from surrounding countries. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman in Bangkok takes a look at one initiative for children at construction sites
Video

Video Public Raises its Voice on Power Plant Pollution

In the United States, proposed rules to cut pollution from the nation’s 600 coal-fired power plants are generating a heated debate. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, charged with writing and implementing the plan, has already received 300,000 written comments. As VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports, another 1,600 people are lining up this week at EPA headquarters and at satellite offices around the country to give their testimony in person.
Video

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict in Gaza, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities. Probably the most important destination is the local bakery. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Gaza City.
Video

Video China Investigates Powerful Former Security Chief

The public in China is welcoming the Communist Party's decision to investigate one of the country's once most powerful politicians, former domestic security chief Zhou Yongkang. Analysts say the move by President Xi Jinping is not only an effort to win more support for the party, but an essential step to furthering much needed economic reforms and removing those who would stand in the way of change. VOA's Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video US-Funded Program Offers Honduran Children Alternative to Illegal Immigration

President Obama and Central American leaders recently agreed to come up with a plan to address poverty and crime in the region that is fueling the surge of young migrants trying to illegally enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden looks at one such program in Honduras - funded in part by the United States - which gives street kids not only food and safety but a chance for a better life without, crossing the border.
Video

Video 'Fab Lab' Igniting Revolution in Kenya

The University of Nairobi’s Science and Technology Park is banking on 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution in the country. Lenny Ruvaga has more for from Nairobi's so-called “FabLab” for VOA.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.

AppleAndroid