News / Asia

NATO: Afghanistan Faces September Security Deadline

VOA News

The Obama administration and NATO will not keep any troops in Afghanistan if the country's new president fails to sign Bilateral Security Agreements with the United States and NATO.

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said after a meeting Tuesday with President Barack Obama the agreements need to be signed by September, or keeping troops there will be a problem.

Outgoing Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign the agreements, although both Afghan presidential candidates Abdullah Abdullah and Ashraf Ghani have committed to doing so.

However, the Afghan presidential election is now complicated by allegations of widespread voter fraud, causing some to worry neither one is sworn in as president before the deadline.

The remaining international troops in Afghanistan are set to depart by year’s end, but the security deal would keep initially 10,000 troops there before the number tapers down gradually.

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by: Ali from: canada
July 08, 2014 10:04 PM
This head line and this issue is the joke of the year. Did us and. Nato get any sign from any afghan to enter in afghanistan or asked?

In Response

by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 09, 2014 1:47 AM
Didn't have to! But you should also ask Canada too, they were there as well. Ooooooops!


by: meanbill from: USA
July 08, 2014 7:08 PM
THE WISE MAN said it; ... No matter what the US says, the US will wait as long as it takes to get an Afghan leader to sign an "Unequal Treaty" giving them permission to kill innocent Afghan men, women and children, and babies, (without facing Afghan prosecution), when attempting to kill (suspected) enemies of America....

IF ONLY the US had provided the Afghan air force the attack war planes, and attack helicopters, the US promised Karzai over (5) years ago, the Afghan government wouldn't need the US air power..... Not one single attack war plane, or helicopter, has been provided to the Afghan air force by US and NATO forces, to this day.... and the Afghan air force now has (9) old outdated 1978 Russian Afghan war attack helicopters, and only (3) of them can fly.... (and that's the way the US will get the Afghans to sign the "Unequal Treaty" isn't it?)..... because they have no air power of any kind?

In Response

by: JigarKHOON from: Kabul
July 09, 2014 3:30 AM
There is no doubt that after a decade or so, there have been many accomplishments under the Karzai administration. Clearly understood, in the areas of health, education, and businesses. However, the major issues remaining are Drug Market, Insurgency, and corruption. The issue of insurgency is here and will remain a regional issue because it is not going anywhere. The Drug Market can be eliminated if international actors really want peace not wast international tax money and other resources. Corruption is the only and main source of facilitating the environment for fraud, drug market, and political instability. This corruption is not limited to bribes or the likes, indeed, why not bother including all forms of illegal conduct. The security is getting worse everyday. I am afraid Afghanistan will not become an epicenter of violence like it did 20 years ago when the US and Russia struggled over geopolitics. The insurgency will only go away if the conditions around the security of Afghanistan are prudently analyzed and then changed. The people of Afghanistan are weary of war and just "talk but no action". Now that Afhgans had their recent presidential elections (June 14, 2014), the international community should remain helpful to Afghanistan as the Afghan Constitution dictates. After all, if the US and NATO do not reach an agreement to successfully sign their "strategic agreement", then what? Will the US consider giving up on the all their military gains? Will NATO not need Afghanistan if the insurgency escalates, or there comes a completely new order here in Afghanistan and the region? Did we learn a lesson from Iraq, Syria and the likes? Can NATO find its way by killing? The answer is no. Cooperation and dialogue are safe diplomatic tools, that help a diplomat get through restrains and rough times. After all, let not the decade accomplishments go flooded, because there are consequences to them.

In Response

by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 09, 2014 1:46 AM
Where do you get these bogus quotes from??? Again, for anyone reading this lunatic's anti-American rantings: The US has not engaged in any 'Unequal Treaties' with Afg or Iraq!!! This lunatic has not provided any proof of these treaties even existing!!! I am here in Afg, my 4th tour! Afg does have an Air Force, comprised of many jets, helos, and cargo planes that are US, British, and French. The outdated aircraft this nutjob is referring to is the old Soviet era aircraft that had to be destroyed because the US/EU forces are not allowed to refurbish them according to international laws. I am here at just one of the many Air bases that are being turned over to the Afghanis.

Again, for all you reading this garbage from Meanbill: our people are still here, in harm's way. This guy is emboldening people like the Taliban to turn against his own countrymen! Ignore his words, you will feel much better.

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