News / Europe

NATO Condemns Syria for Downing Turkish Jet

NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks to the press on June 26, 2012 at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels.NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks to the press on June 26, 2012 at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels.
x
NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks to the press on June 26, 2012 at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels.
NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks to the press on June 26, 2012 at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels.
Selah Hennessy
LONDON - NATO member states have condemned Syria for shooting down a Turkish military jet last Friday.  Speaking Tuesday, NATO chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen called the action "unacceptable."  
 
Rasmussen spoke at a news conference in Brussels after a meeting of the ambassadors from NATO’s 28 member states.

During the Brussels meeting, Turkey outlined its account of last Friday’s incident.

Turkish officials say the military jet was an unarmed plane on a training mission and was flying above international waters when it was shot down. Damascus says it acted in self-defense after the plane entered Syrian airspace.

Rasmussen said that NATO stands in solidarity with Turkey.

"It is another example of the Syrian authorities disregard for international norms, peace and security and human life," said Rasmussen.

Tuesday’s meeting came under Article 4 of NATO’s founding treaty.  That article says any country may consult fellow member-states if it considers its territorial integrity, political independence, or security to be under threat.

Rasmussen said NATO had not discussed Article 5 of the group’s founding treaty. Article 5 enables the use of force should a member come under attack.

Wyn Rees, an international security expert at Britain’s University of Nottingham, says NATO is keen to demonstrate its support for Turkey.

"Turkey obviously has been a member of NATO for a very long time," said Rees.  "It's a very important state within the alliance. So the fact that it has now suffered this loss of an aircraft, it's important for the other NATO members to show solidarity."

Rees says NATO also has a second agenda: It hopes to restrain Turkey from escalating the situation.

"The NATO members are not looking for a pretext on which to intervene and therefore they do not want one of their members to drag them into such an action," added Rees.

Rees says he thinks this situation will be dealt with diplomatically. But he says by shooting down Turkey’s plane, Syria has raised new questions about its internal situation.

"For a country to kind of engage in such an act - such a hostile act - seems rather stupid frankly," Rees noted.  "And one wonders just how much control the Assad regime has over parts of the military now. It kind of raises that deeper question, is the military fully under the command of the civilian government?"

The two men on board the jet shot down Friday have not been found.

You May Like

Ebola Death Toll Nears 5,000 as Virus Advances

West Africa bears heaviest burden; Mali toddler’s death raises new fears More

Jordan’s Battle With Islamic State Militants Carries Domestic Risks

There are Western concerns Islamic State militants soon may unleash offensive in kingdom that could create upheaval - though nation has solid intel, grip on banking system More

Asian-Americans Assume Office in Record Numbers

Steadily deepening engagement in local politics pays off for politicians like Chinese-American Judy Chu More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
    Next 
by: NVO from: USA
June 27, 2012 10:00 PM
NATO is part&parcel of THE NEW WORLD ORDER.
WAKE UP PEOPLE!!!


by: frnchy from: France
June 27, 2012 3:54 PM
The fact is Amercan's Agenda of War is now focusing on Syria and Iran. See the Agenda and be happy if you are not in the list
1) Iraq -- Finished (They achieved the target by killing Saddam and for oil)
2) Afghanistan - Almost Finished (They achieved the target by killing Osama Bin Laden)
3) Iran (Coming Soon)
4) Syria (On going Target : Assad)
5) Pakistan (Poor failed state destroyed by the Taliban itself) but Americans are worried for their nukes will come to the Talibans
6) North Korea
7) Yemen
All these states will be treated one by one


by: squiddy from: canada
June 27, 2012 3:47 PM
The fact that the plane was unarmed means nothing as they intrude in an foreign air space the people on the ground can’t see if the UFO is armed or not, Mr Tayyip Erdoğan was the one committing a error in judgement by sending the unmanned plane there in a time of tension. Turkey is supporting the FSA and is hostile towards Syria.


by: Wes from: Oklahoma
June 27, 2012 3:30 PM
The Turks and NATO are lying. This aircraft was shot down by a Russian type ZPU (AAA) that has a maximum range of 1.2 kilometers. Which clearly means that the aircraft couldn't have been over international waters. This is just another lie by western governments to go to war over propaganda.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=5b8_1340635536


by: ROMMEL
June 27, 2012 10:45 AM
You can't defend Syria by saying "The Turkish jet WAS in Syrian airspace" and United States would do the same thing. The fact is the jet was unarmed and it was just a reconnaissance jet. The Syrians shot it down without asking what country it was from or if it was in its airspace on accident. Assad is a criminal who bombs his own people without even letting the aid come in and help the victims...he deserves to be kicked out of power

In Response

by: ROMMEL
June 27, 2012 7:19 PM
@David you could be absolutely right. It may be Turkey's fault or it may be Syria's fault, whichever it is the fact remains that Assad needs to be kicked out of power. Whether Assad shot down no jets are millions of jets, he has had a brutal history and we can only hope that democracy will prevail and peace will be restored in Syria

In Response

by: David from: Boise
June 27, 2012 3:02 PM
Who said it was unarmed? Ah, that's right.... The ones who flew straight into the gun fire, eh? C'mon now! Those pilots were not so stupid as to not know what and where they were going. They were pros and suffered the consequences.


by: john johns from: austin texas
June 27, 2012 10:30 AM
In no way is the shooting down an aircraft acceptable behavior unless the aircraft is acting aggressively. Interception and armed escort away is the way to handle this unless retaliation is desired. Syria evidently mistakes diplomacy as weak and therefore unacceptable. To put this in a context : if a man walks on the edge of your lawn he is not shot, shoved or knocked about. He is asked to refrain from doing this act. To shoot and/or kill is an act that should bring strong retribution worldwide irregardless of location. To accept this action from Syria is to condone it, period.

In Response

by: john johns from: austin texas
June 28, 2012 8:26 AM
Joseph and David, I assume neither of you understood my message, either that or you are "venting" your spleen. I stand by and behind my convictions however I do not do the same for my government nor any other government. Over the past 70 so years I have seen each and every single one lie, not stretch the truth but out and out lie.

In Response

by: Joseph Zrnchik from: Highland, IN
June 27, 2012 5:50 PM
Tell that one to the 290 Iranian civilians who were slaughtered by the USS Vincennes as it was in Iranian costal waters and shot down IR Flight 655 over Iranian territory. Then the US said the plane was diving,when it was climbing. It said it was out of its corridor and recording proved it was not. THen the US said it did not have its transponder on. An internation investigation proved the US lied again. THis is the type of hypocrisy the world has to contantly deal with. My government has become a lying psychopath and enemy of our U.S. Constitution. We need a revolition as the elite now NEED war to keep their scam going.

In Response

by: David from: Boise
June 27, 2012 3:00 PM
And if Mexico or Canada were harboring and aiding the very elements responsible for killing civilians, etc. You'd have no problem with a Mexican fighter jet cruising over your ports and taking pictures, eh? Never mind all the bellicose statements coming from the rest of the world. And the Syrians apologized for the act while Americans, after shooting down an Iranian airliner no less and killing 290 people, would argue till the end of time that their "mistake" was legitimate. Sauce for the goose my friend. And a good indication that the Syrians will not be the push overs that NATO wishes they were.


by: bob from: kiris
June 27, 2012 10:29 AM
This is how big EIRONIA in Greek is from the NATO.
see under KYPROS see under HELLAS see under ARMENIA
see under KOURDIS and more.


by: Ludlum from: former USA
June 27, 2012 10:18 AM
Kerem is correct. This is cold war for Iran's OIL, now that the Zionists have stolen Iraq's oil. I don't care for Ass-ad but I say Syria did exactly what any other self-respecting country including the Consortium of American States would do, if for example an Iranian military jet entered its air space without permission.

In Response

by: DarkMatter from: USA
June 27, 2012 12:29 PM
There is a big difference between a Turkish jet entering Syrain airspace (disputed) and an Iranian jet entering American airspace. First off, Turkey an Syria share a border while America and Iran are thousands of miles apart. Secondly, a Turkish plane could fly to Syria in minutes and a single tank of fuel. An Iranian plane would take hours and multiple stops.


by: Jay from: LR
June 26, 2012 1:34 PM
In todays world Syria did the right thing. It was Syrian airspace and Turkey did not ask for permission. The USA would have done the same thing NATO would have done the same thing. Media get your *&%# straight.

In Response

by: Mark from: Florida
June 27, 2012 10:10 AM
It is disputed that the Turkish jet was in Syrian airspace. Turkey says it was over international waters. Syria says it was over a section of airspace that they claim is theirs, but the world doesn't recognize it as Syrian airspace.


by: C.Lau from: San Diego, Ca
June 26, 2012 1:27 PM
i know the cold war is over, but i do agree that all nations of NATO need to stand together. If we dont all get on the same page with this, what is the use of NATO anymore? they will be render impotent, which is what most people think about NATO anyway. I like NATO and what it stands for, and i think its important that it continues on as a strong force to be reckoned with.

Comments page of 2
    Next 

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rulesi
X
October 21, 2014 12:20 AM
European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Ebola Orphanage Opens in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. Adam Bailes reports for VOA about a new interim care center that's aimed at helping the growing number of children affected by Ebola.
Video

Video Young Nairobi Tech Innovator on 'Track' in Security Business

A 24-year-old technology innovator in Nairobi has invented a tracking device that monitors and secures cars. He has also come up with what he claims is the most robust audio-visual surveillance system yet. As Lenny Ruvaga reports from the Kenyan capital, his innovations are offering alternative security solutions.
Video

Video Latinas Converting to Islam for Identity, Structure

Latinos are one of the fastest growing groups in the Muslim religion. According to the Pew Research Center, about 6 percent of American Muslims are Latino. And a little more than half of new converts are female. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti travelled to Miami, Florida -- where two out of every three residents is Hispanic -- to learn more.
Video

Video Exclusive: American Joins Kurds' Anti-IS Fight

The United States and other Western nations have expressed alarm about their citizens joining Islamic State forces in Syria and Iraq. In a rare counterpoint to the phenomenon, an American has taken up arms with the militants' Syrian Kurdish opponents. Elizabeth Arrott has more in this exclusive profile by VOA Kurdish reporter Zana Omer in Ras al Ayn, Syria.
Video

Video South Korea Confronts Violence Within Military Ranks

Every able-bodied South Korean male between 18 and 35 must serve for 21 to 36 months in the country’s armed forces, depending upon the specific branch. For many, service is a rite of passage to manhood. But there are growing concerns that bullying and violence come along with the tradition. Reporter Jason Strother has more from Seoul.
Video

Video North Carolina Emerges as Key Election Battleground

U.S. congressional midterm elections will be held on November 4th and most political analysts give Republicans an excellent chance to win a majority in the U.S. Senate, which Democrats now control. So what are the issues driving voters in this congressional election year? VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone traveled to North Carolina, one of the most politically competitive states in the country, to find out.
Video

Video Comanche People Maintain Pride in Their Heritage

The Comanche (Indian nation) once were called the “Lords of the Plains,” with an empire that included half the land area of current day Texas, large parts of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas and Colorado.The fierceness and battle prowess of these warriors on horseback delayed the settlement of most of West Texas for four decades. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Lawton, Oklahoma, that while their warrior days are over, the 15,000 members of the Comanche Nation remain a proud people.
Video

Video Turkey Campus Attacks Raise Islamic Radicalization Fears

Concerns are growing in Turkey of Islamic radicalization at some universities, after clashes between supporters of the jihadist group Islamic State (IS) or ISIS, and those opposed to the extremists. Pro-jihadist literature is on sale openly on the streets of Istanbul. Critics accuse the government of turning a blind eye to radicalism at home, while Kurds accuse the president of supporting IS - a charge strongly denied. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

All About America

AppleAndroid