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    Netanyahu: No Israeli Strike on Iran in 'Days or Weeks'

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says he will give international sanctions against Iran a chance to work, and is not planning an attack on its nuclear facilities in the coming "days or weeks."

    Speaking to Israeli television on Thursday, Netanyahu said he prefers a peaceful solution of the dispute with Iran, but insisted that his country will not allow Iran to obtain a nuclear weapon.

    Netanyahu returned Thursday from talks in Washington, where he said Israel could not afford to wait much longer for diplomacy and sanctions to deter Iran's nuclear program.

    The Israeli leader has acknowledged what he calls "fundamental differences" between the U.S. and Israeli approach to Iran.  Israel feels the Iranian nuclear threat more acutely than does Washington, said Netanyahu.

    "The American timetable in regards to preventing Iran becoming nuclear is not the same as the Israeli timetable," he said.  "The Israeli timetable is of course under a different schedule. I would be happy if the international effort succeeded, if Iran voluntarily decided to disarm its nuclear plan."

    President Barack Obama has urged Netanyahu to give diplomacy and sanctions more time, but also has reiterated the U.S. position that all options are on the table to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.

    U.S. Senator John McCain told Alhurra TV on Thursday that sanctions are failing.

    "The sanctions that have been imposed on Iran, in the view of every expert, have not changed their course toward obtaining nuclear weapons," he said.

    McCain was Obama's Republican Party opponent in the 2008 presidential election.  He said he agrees with the assessments of senior U.S. military officials who see the potential fall of the government of President Bashar al-Assad in neighboring Syria as the biggest blow to Tehran in 25 years.

    Meanwhile, a group of six world powers on Thursday called on Iran to keep its promise to allow International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors access to a military site amid reports Tehran may be cleaning it of evidence related to nuclear arms experiments.

    The statement by the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council - the United States, China, Russia, France and Britain - plus Germany urged Iran to allow inspectors prompt access to the Parchin military base.

    Some Western diplomats believe Iran might be delaying the inspectors' trip to the base in order to remove evidence of experiments on nuclear-related high explosive trigger tests, citing recent satellite pictures showing apparent changes to its structure.

    Iran's IAEA ambassador, Ali Asghar Soltanieh, told reporters the suspicions aired about Parchin were "childish" and "ridiculous."  He did not elaborate.

    Iran denies allegations it is attempting to develop atomic weapons and says its nuclear activities are purely for power generation and medical research.

    Some information for this report was provided by AFP and Reuters.

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    by: Gab to Huang Jun
    March 17, 2012 10:50 AM
    Even if the us is the biggest arms dealer in the world, why are over 90% of all the conflicts in the world today involve repressive Islamic regimes. So again I ask you how many of them are buying US made military arms? They are fighting with Russian, French, German, and Chinese weapons. The vast majority of US military arms are sold to India, Australia, South Korea, Singapore, Saudi Arabia. Then you bring up Israel, my answer is that Arabs/Muslims control 99.9% of the Middle East land mass.

    by: HUANG JUN TO GAB
    March 16, 2012 8:57 PM
    The first is the US, the biggest arms seller in the World. The second is Israel with its mad ambition to expend its territory by invading and occupying lands of Palestine, Syria, Liban, Egypt: Sinai Peninsula, The Golan Heights, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, East Jerusalem.

    by: Gab to Huang Jun
    March 16, 2012 5:24 AM
    Your original question was: "Gab, so you tend to blame Muslim society for all the troubles in the Middle East?" So I pointed out as many Muslim Countries as I had room for in one post, where Muslims have a long history of issues with their neighbors. Your response is that "evil Countries" always try to stir up hatred to rob them of oil and minerals. Name the Countries that I listed that are being robbed and why the barriers are needed? Start with Israel.

    by: HUANG JUN TO GAB
    March 15, 2012 9:32 PM
    Gab, do you know why? Because some evil countries always try to stir up hatred, violence around the World for their own benefits in the names of supporting democracy, freedom. By doing so they can make huge profit by selling weapons, sending troops to other countries to rob those of oil, minerals. Who is the number one weapon exporter of all?

    by: Gab to Huang Jun, why is a fence needed between-
    March 15, 2012 5:33 AM
    Israel/Gaza, Malaysia/Thailand fence, Morocco- Spain, the Indo-Bangladeshi barrier, Indian-Kashmir barrier, Iran-Pakistan barrier, Kazakh-Uzbekistan barrier, Kuwait-Iraq barrier, Pakistan-Afghanistan barrier, Russia/Chechnya, Saudi-Yemen barrier, Arab Emirates/Oman, Saudi/Yemen, Turkmen/ Uzbekistan, Somalia/Kenya, and many more walls involving Muslim Countries? Border conflicts between Muslim conflicts with their Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Catholic, Russian Orthodox, and Buddhist neighbors.

    by: HUANG JUN TO GAB
    March 14, 2012 1:45 AM
    Gab, so you tend to blame Muslim society for all the troubles in the Middle East? How come you get that Fascist idea, Have you learned from Hitler?

    by: mervin
    March 13, 2012 1:47 AM
    Lets peace prevail on earth,no more wars.

    by: Gab to Hoang Jun
    March 12, 2012 3:44 PM
    A statement backed up by the belligerence of sending weapons and explosives to known terrorist organizations who have vowed the complete destruction of the Jewish State. These are a continuous acts of war. "Why is Israel so resented by its neighbors?" Answer: Because they are the only non-Arab, non-Muslim minority in the Middle East with the right of self determination.

    by: Gab to Hoang Jun
    March 12, 2012 3:41 PM
    A statement backed up by the belligerence of sending weapons and explosives to known terrorist organizations who have vowed the complete destruction of the Jewish State. These are a continuous acts of war. "Why is Israel so resented by its neighbors?" Answer: Because they are the only non-Arab, non-Muslim minority in the Middle East with the right of self determination.

    by: HOANG JUN TO GAB
    March 11, 2012 8:14 PM
    GRAB, the time for those who rely only on a statement as a pretext to launch attacks at or to invade other territories is over. Why Israel have been so resented by its neighbors? Because they always use wars to solve every problems.
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