News / Health

New Human Body Part Discovered

Belgian surgeons say they have discovered a new body part. (University of Leuven)
Belgian surgeons say they have discovered a new body part. (University of Leuven)

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VOA News
Scientists have discovered a new human body part.

Knee surgeons at the University of Leuven in Belgium described, for the first time, a previously unknown ligament in the knee. The anterolateral ligament (ALL) appears to play an important role in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears.

Specifically, many patients who tear their ACL continue to have problems even after corrective surgery. Patients with ACL-repaired knees continue to experience so-called 'pivot shift', or episodes where the knee 'gives way' during activity. ACL injuries are common among athletes in pivot-heavy sports such as soccer, basketball, skiing and football.

The existence of the ALL was suggested by a French surgeon in 1879, who thought there might be an additional ligament located on the anterior of the knee.

For the last four years, orthopaedic surgeons Dr. Steven Claes and Professor Dr, Johan Bellemans have been conducting research to see if the ligament described could play a role in continued knee problems after an ACL repair.

The two doctors used cadavers to confirm the existence of the ALL, which was present in all but one of the 41 cadavers examined.

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by: John Carter
November 07, 2013 11:49 AM
@Meshari Alqoopisi

We are not God's creation though, but merely an accident in nature :).


by: Rick Howell from: Stowe, Vermont USA
November 07, 2013 9:51 AM
Based on my education in related structural engineering and 13-years of active research in ACL-safety, it appears that this newly discovered 'ALL ligament' can provide critical "rotational" stability in terms of 'rotation about the long-axis of the tibia' — but the tibia torque that contributes to injurious ACL-strain is secondary in magnitude to the valgus torque that's the primary cause of ACL-strain ... when it comes to the most frequent way the ACL is injured. Valgus torque is by far the most dominant load-vector, in magnitude, relative to tibia-torque when it comes to loading that produces strain across the ACL (ref: SHIN, C. S., A. M. CHAUDHARI, and T. P. ANDRIACCHI. Valgus Plus Internal Rotation Moments Increase Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain More Than Either Alone.

Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 43, No. 8, pp. 1484–1491, 2011). Because the 'ALL-ligament' is located on the outside (lateral side) of the knee, it will go into compression during typical valgus-dominant loading that causes most ACL-injuries ... especially skiing and soccer ACL-injuries. Tension, not compression, causes ACL strain. In this way and based on fundamental principles of structural engineering, it appears that the ALL-ligament's position on the structure of the knee should provide stability to tibia-rotation — and it is therefore clearly contributory to ACL stability — but providing stability to tibia-rotation is secondary to providing stability to valgus torque, and a ligament that goes into compression rather than tension in the presence of valgus torque cannot provide primary stability during 'typical' ACL-injuries that involve mostly valgus-loading. Make no doubt about it: providing contributory stability is good and important. The primary ligament on the other side of the knee (the MCL) provides some stability to tibia rotation (too) — but the MCL provides the most significant collaborative stability to the ACL in the presence of the dominant load that causes ACL-strain, valgus torque.

That's my posit.


by: Meshari Alqoopisi from: Saudi Arabia
November 07, 2013 4:48 AM
This is show how human knowledge is weak about God creation ..


by: Rick Howell from: Stowe, Vermont
November 06, 2013 6:07 PM
Wow!! This is exciting! Is this discovery verified by peer-review in a medical-science journal ?

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