News / Asia

Putin, Chinese President Hold Kremlin Meeting

Chinese President Xi Jinping (L) and First Lady Peng Liyuan wave as they disembark from a plane upon their arrival at Moscow's Vnukovo airport, March 22, 2013.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (L) and First Lady Peng Liyuan wave as they disembark from a plane upon their arrival at Moscow's Vnukovo airport, March 22, 2013.
VOA News
Russian President Vladimir Putin has met with China's new President Xi Jinping, who arrived in Moscow Friday on his first foreign trip since taking the official title last week.

The two leaders met in the Grand Kremlin Palace's ornate St. George Hall.  Putin said he was grateful Mr. Xi had made Russia his first foreign destination as president and called Russian-Chinese relations "a paramount factor of world politics."

Western analysts are framing the visit as an effort by Beijing to boost shared strategic and business interests. China's official Xinhua news agency says the two countries are expected to strike deals on boosting oil trade and building a natural gas pipeline linking the two countries.

Year-long bilateral talks on a deal under which Russia would provide as much as 68 billion cubic meters of gas annually in a new pipeline have become ensnared in pricing negotiations. At a briefing this week, Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Cheng Guoping would sign new oil and gas deals, but he did not provide details.

Cheng also noted the emergence in the past two decades of a "comprehensive strategic partnership of coordination," highlighting the bilateral settlement of historic border disputes that flared with the fall of the Soviet Union more than two decades ago.

The two countries are also closely aligned diplomatically, with Beijing following Moscow's lead on the United Nations Security Council in opposing outside intervention in Syria's bloody civil war.

Russia, in turn, has followed China's lead on North Korea, as the Council presses Pyongyang to end its push for nuclear weapons.

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by: John Lone from: San Diego
March 24, 2013 12:42 AM
Chinese are very cunning, they are trying to rob the Russian soft spots
to remove any temporary mistrust between the two so they can focus on territorial
expansion and aggression into other neighbors. When they achieve their
objectives then they will turn north against Russia. You have to be
chinese to understand china's motives and intentions, world domination
through divide and conquer with surprise attacked like war with India
in 1962 and Vietnam in 1979. China cannot be trust and should never trusted

by: Cả Thộn from: Hà Nội
March 22, 2013 4:31 PM
Russia can not sell oil and gas to China at cheap price while they can sell it to Europe for much more money. China can not buy oil and gas at fair price for their cheap cheap industries. That is the reason why China tries so hard to conquer South China Sea by force to grap free oil ang gas under the seabed.

by: Wangchuk from: NYC
March 22, 2013 9:58 AM
This move is to send a signal that China & Russia are working on a closer relationship to counter US & EU influence in the world. However, historically China & Russia have had very tense relations & even fought a low-level border conflict in the 1970s. Bilateral trade b/t Russia & China is about $80 billion. US-China bilateral trade is about $539 billion. You can do the math to concluce that good economic relations w/ the USA is more important to China than their trade w/ Russia.

by: Nemo
March 22, 2013 9:06 AM
You always want freedom and democracy.But you should also know that the United States in transporting weapons to Syria, you always want to their own interests, in the war of liberation of the Chinese Communist Party is the opposition to freedom, democracy, but the United States to support the Government, why, because the interests of the United States,As for the other countries, I can bluntly stated that, except for a few countries, most of the countries dependent on the United States, the son of the United States, what most countries, only the United States

by: Kafantaris from: USA, Ohio
March 22, 2013 5:20 AM
Far from creating a new world order, Russia and China have in fact perpetuated the old disorder. The best example of this is Syria. When other nations came together and tried to bring a peaceful resolution to Syria it was Russia and China -- and on three separate occasions -- that blocked them. Not because Russia and China had better ideas but because it looked like regime change for Syria -- something they feared happening in their own countries. Why would they help topple Assad if their own regimes are no better, and Assad's downfall might encourage their own?

Conveniently Russia and China lifted not a finger to sort things out in Syria. Moreover, they have rendered the rest of the nations impotent of doing anything as well. Meanwhile the Syrian people suffered greatly and thousands died as their country descended into the depths of civil war. All along we continue to watch helplessly from the sidelines.

If this is Mr. Putin's idea of new world order, we want no part of it. As for China, it is now intertwined with the economic interests of the nations of the world, and can no longer afford to keep in lockstep with the stagnating Russia.

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