News / Europe

New Generation in Ukraine Forges a New National Identity

The girl is painting a slogan that reads
The girl is painting a slogan that reads "Putin you can kill us but you can't take away our freedom" in Kyiv's Independence Square, Ukraine, Mar. 8, 2014. (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
As the confrontation between the West and Russia over Russia’s actions in Crimea unfolds Ukraine’s acting foreign minister has reiterated that while his country wants a peaceful resolution to the standoff with Russia, Ukrainians are unwilling to be held hostage to the “old Soviet-style” of threat and intimidation.

Comparing the Crimea quarrel with Russia to the three-month confrontation in Kyiv’s Maidan between protesters and the now ousted Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych, a Russian ally, Andrii Deshchytsia told a packed news conference on Saturday that Ukraine has changed in this revolution, the country’s fourth in nearly a century, and that it is moving on from the past and is carving out a true sense of national independence.

“All that happened in Ukraine is difficult to put in some patterns known from previous revolutions,” he said. “What is very promising here is that we are now using the creativity of a young Ukrainian generation, which is a strong weapon against the old Soviet-style pattern.”

The country’s top diplomat isn’t alone in identifying a new sense of national purpose and identity emerging in post-Yanukovych Ukraine—a country Russia’s Vladimir Putin once quipped wasn’t a real country.

  • A woman places some flowers and reads the notes on flowers to the dead already laid in Kyiv's Independence Square, Ukraine, Mar. 8, 2014. (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
  • People look at flowers placed in Kyiv's Independence Square in memory of anti-government protesters killed during recent clashes, Mar. 8. 2014. (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
  • The girl is painting a slogan that reads "Putin you can kill us but you can't take away our freedom" in Kyiv's Independence Square, Ukraine, Mar. 8, 2014. (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
  • One of the shrines to those who were killed during clashes in the Independence Square in Kyiv, Ukrine, Mar. 8, 2014. (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
  • A general view of Kyiv's Independence in Ukraine, Mar. 8, 2014 (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)

A generational change

While international support for Ukraine in the tense and highly dangerous standoff over Crimea is helping to instill confidence in the country about a new, more West-aligned future, some analysts, as well as Ukrainians, say Ukraine is going through a generational change. That change is seeing the formation of a unifying post-Soviet Ukrainian national identity that is subsuming traditional linguistic splits between the country’s ethnic Russians and Ukrainians, they say.

“Can you notice now that the Ukrainian nation starts to speak with one voice, no matter whether people are from the left or right of the political spectrum,” says Petro Poroshenko, a lawmaker and business oligarch known as the “Chocolate King” for his confectionary empire.

Tipped as a possible candidate in the presidential elections slated for May, the 48-year-old Poroshenko was quick to throw in his lot with the Independence Square protesters who ousted Yanukovych following his decision not to sign a trade pact with the European Union in favor of closer ties with Russia.  “The top priority for all Ukrainians is national sovereignty and territorial integrity,” Poroshenko says.

He argues that Russia’s strong-armed tactics in Crimea are having a quickening effect on the coalescing of Ukrainians. He acknowledges there is some restiveness in a handful of Ukrainian regions. But he insists ethnic Russian fears fomented by “fifth-columnists and agent provocateurs are proving less and less successful.”

Some Ukraine watchers say Putin may be surprised by the firm response among Ukrainians to his approach to Ukraine and the reaction his land-grab in Crimea, which has an ethnic Russian majority, has provoked. 

Michael Willard, an American advertising executive and owner of a public relations agency in Kyiv, thinks the Russian leader views Ukraine through a Soviet-type prism, seeing the country as an offshoot of Russia. He argues Putin has misread Ukraine and missed the fact that since the break-up of the Soviet Union, Ukraine has started to develop along very separate lines.

“I have been in Ukraine for 20 years now and this whole country has totally changed over that period,” Willard says. “It is just like the old advert goes: it is not your father’s Oldsmobile, it is not Brezhnev’s Ukraine.” He says the young – those born since the collapse of Communism—are the drivers behind the shift.

East-west ethnic divide a fiction

Writing in America’s New Republic magazine, Julia Ioffe, a commentator on Russia and Ukraine, also pinpoints the shift away from Russia as originating with those born since 1991. She dismisses the “conventional wisdom” of looking at Ukraine as a country divided between a Europe-tilted Ukrainian-speaking West and a Moscow-favoring Russian-speaking East, noting that the east-west axis of ethnicity is a false one. The different ethnicities are more mixed.

“It would take a very talented surgeon to carve the two languages apart—or a charlatan to claim it can be done,” she wrote.  “The real split is generational,” she argues.

Ukrainian military remains united

That may go some way to explain why there appears to be no ferment or apparent divisions inside the Ukrainian military.

Aside from the early defection of Ukraine’s navy chief Denys Berezovky, who swore allegiance to pro-Russian leaders in Crimea the day after he had been appointed as head of the navy by Kyiv authorities, the Ukrainian military has remained loyal to the interim Ukrainian government.

Russian appeals to Ukrainian navy and army personnel in Crimea to switch sides have fallen on deaf ears, even when military installations have been overrun.

Lt. Col. Olexandr Lomako, a deputy commander of an anti-aircraft regiment stationed 60 miles northeast of Sevastopol, told the Los Angeles Times: “The Russians captured our base and disarmed us only because they took us by surprise and because we didn’t want to start a big war by armed resistance.”

Ukrainian lawmaker Lesya Orobets (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)Ukrainian lawmaker Lesya Orobets (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
x
Ukrainian lawmaker Lesya Orobets (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
Ukrainian lawmaker Lesya Orobets (Jamie Dettmer/VOA)
“I am shocked: I could never have imagined we would have such a loyal army,” says Lesya Orobets, an opposition politician and one of the leaders of the Maidan revolution. She says that is especially surprising since solders are poorly paid and the army was mismanaged under Yanukovych.

“All these days of crisis we have seen loyalty and rebuffs of Russian surrender demands,” she says. “When I saw news video of a group of Ukrainian soldiers marching towards armed Russian troops just waving our flag, I started crying.”

Orobets argues that the battlefield of the Maidan and the resistance to Yanukovych has acted as a forge for the shaping of a new Ukrainian national identity – it is one that has some way to go for completion, she says.

But everyday now in Kyiv the memory of the three-month struggle against Yanukovych is being remembered and honored. On the Maidan Ukrainians – old as well as young, in small and large groups – pick their through what was once a battlefield, adding more multi-colored flowers to the piles already placed where young revolutionaries fell to sniper bullets.

You May Like

Captured IS Militants Explain Why They Fought

Fighters from Turkey, Syria tell VOA Kurdish Service what drew them to extremism, jihad More

Security Experts Split on Kenyan Barrier Wall

Experts divided on whether initiative aiming to keep out al-Shabab militants is long-awaited solution or misguided effort More

Video Philippines Wants Tourists Spending Money at New Casinos

Officials say they hope to turn Manila into the next Macau, which has long been Asia’s gambling hub More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: John Haberstroh from: Qatar
March 09, 2014 6:27 AM
The coup-installed government consists of the losers of the 2010 and 2012 elections, i.e., Tymoshenko's oligarchs, plus the far-right and neo-Nazi militias who provided the violence essential to the coup's success. The new generation in Ukraine is not a post-democratic generation, and it is not a pro-Tymoshenko generation.

By the way, are my U.S. tax dollars paying for VOA's pro-coup propaganda?

by: linda from: usa
March 08, 2014 4:46 PM
Your nationality does not decide the person or country you are. We have all nationalities and each one has their own traditions, however we all are free citizens of the United States of America
In Response

by: David Kessel
March 09, 2014 11:16 PM
Legally, I would not agree with you, Linda. Unless a person is a dual national, he is just a holder of American nationality. Such is the international law. Americans like saying " I'm Irish, I'm Italian, I'm Polish" but this designates heritage, not nationality. Nationality is American for all. Unless one is not a US citizen.
In Response

by: Peter from: Turkey
March 09, 2014 5:57 AM
Linda: who are you talking about? Neither Ukrainians nor Russians are citizens of the US. Many might wish to be, but it's extremely difficult, often impossible, even to get a work visa to the US, much less citizenship. I have a Bulgarian friend who tried for 12 years to get an American visa. Finally he moved to Germany instead, which is grnerally much more welcoming of foreigners.

by: Anonymous
March 08, 2014 4:38 PM
it says 'Putin, you can lie to your country, degrade my ...'
In Response

by: Anonymous
March 08, 2014 9:53 PM
you're right...the person did not translate what the girl is painting in the picture correctly...

by: monica from: lake havasu city az
March 08, 2014 4:37 PM
My husbands Jewish grandparents left Ukraine in 1903 for freedom from Czarist Russia and I am sure they would be proud of todays Ukrainians. Don't let Russia threaten you!!

by: Anonymous
March 08, 2014 4:34 PM
that's not what it says

by: Svetlana M. from: Russia
March 08, 2014 11:06 AM
"New Generation in Ukraine Forges a New National Identity...??"
if you think you could "forge" a new national identity by writing slogans on a cardboard - than you are sillier than we thought you are. Look at the "Philistines" - they have been trying to "forge" an identity... but Arabs are Arabs.. and the forgery is apparent and silly... its derided everywhere it was tried.
In Response

by: David Kessel
March 09, 2014 11:21 PM
In the Arab world, people divide themselves by citizenship regardless of the fact that all speak Arabic. Any native-Arabic speaking person is an Arab regardless of religion or ancestry, but Arab designates culture only, not nationality. That's why Palestinians are forging a new identity-- they are trying to be on equal footing with Syrians, Lebanese, Moroccans, etc. That's how things are among Arabs. There's no such race or nationality as " Arab". You can be an Arab, too. Just speak Arabic fluently.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grievingi
X
Benno Muchler
March 26, 2015 3:41 PM
Beatrice Yardolo was to make history as Liberia’s last Ebola patient. Liberians recently started counting down 42 days, the period that has to go by without a single new infection until the World Health Organization can declare a country Ebola-free. That countdown stopped on March 20 when there was another new case of Ebola, making Yardolo’s story a reminder that Ebola is far from over. Benno Muchler reports from Monrovia.
Video

Video Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grieving

Beatrice Yardolo was to make history as Liberia’s last Ebola patient. Liberians recently started counting down 42 days, the period that has to go by without a single new infection until the World Health Organization can declare a country Ebola-free. That countdown stopped on March 20 when there was another new case of Ebola, making Yardolo’s story a reminder that Ebola is far from over. Benno Muchler reports from Monrovia.
Video

Video Cambodian Land Grabs Threaten Traditional Communities

Indigenous communities in Cambodia's Ratanakiri province say the government’s economic land concession policy is taking away their land and traditional way of life, making many fear that their identity will soon be lost. Local authorities, though, have denied this is the case. VOA's Say Mony went to investigate and filed this report, narrated by Colin Lovett.
Video

Video US, South Korea Conduct Joint Military Exercises

The Eighth U.S. Army Division and the Eighth Republic of Korea Mechanized Infantry Division put on a well orchestrated show of force for the media this week during their joint military training exercises in South Korea. VOA’s Seoul correspondent Brian Padden was there and reports the soldiers were well disciplined both in conducting a complex live fire exercise and in staying on message with the press.
Video

Video Space Program Status Disappoints 'Last Man on the Moon'

One of the films that drew big crowds last week at the annual South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, tells the story of the last human being to stand on the moon, U.S. astronaut Eugene Cernan. It has been 42 years since Cernan returned from the moon and he laments that no one else has gone there since. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Young Filmmakers Shine Spotlight on Giving Back

A group of student filmmakers from across the United States joined President Barack Obama at the White House this month for the second annual White House Student Film Festival. Fifteen short films were officially selected from more than 1,500 entries by students aged 6 through 18. The filmmakers and their families then joined the president and a group of celebrities for a screening of their films. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video VOA Exclusive: Interview with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, during his first visit as president to Washington, gave a one-on-one interview with VOA Afghan Service reporter Said Suleiman Ashna, about his request for a change in U.S. troop levels, the threat from the Islamic State, and repairing relations with the United States and Pakistan. The interview was held at Blair House, late Sunday, in Pashto.
Video

Video California Science Center Tells Story of Dead Sea Scrolls

The ancient manuscripts were uncovered in the mid-20th century, and they are still yielding clues about life and religious beliefs in ancient Israel. As VOA's Mike O'Sullivan reports, an exhibit in Los Angeles shows how modern science is bringing the history of these ancient documents to life.
Video

Video Angelina Jolie Takes Another Bold Step

Hollywood actress and filmmaker Angelina Jolie has revealed she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to lower her odds of getting cancer. Doctors say the huge publicity over her decision will help raise awareness about the importance of cancer screening. VOA’s George Putic has more

All About America

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More