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New Natural Gas Pipeline Into NYC Is Volatile Issue

New Natural Gas Pipeline Into NYC Is Volatile Issuei
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May 31, 2013
New York City is crisscrossed with underground natural gas pipelines, many decades old, supplying cooking and heating gas to homes and businesses. But safety and environmental concerns about a new gas pipeline being built into Manhattan’s west side have given rise to protest, and calls for New York to move more quickly to sustainable forms of energy. VOA's Carolyn Weaver reports on the situation.

New Natural Gas Pipeline Into NYC Is Volatile Issue

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Carolyn Weaver
— New York City is crisscrossed with underground natural gas pipelines, many decades old, supplying cooking and heating gas to homes and businesses. But safety and environmental concerns about a new gas pipeline being built into Manhattan’s west side have given rise to protest, and calls for New York to move more quickly to sustainable forms of energy.

The high-pressure Spectra Energy pipeline, set to begin operating in late fall, travels under parts of New Jersey, Staten Island, and the Hudson River, and enters Manhattan next to a playground and park. "This is an incredibly high-population area and it’s insane what they’re doing," said Kathleen Thomas, one of several hundred protesters who rallied in Manhattan recently to call on President Barack Obama to withhold support for all new fossil-fuel pipelines.

Thomas noted that the Spectra pipeline is similar in design and pressure to one that exploded in 2010, destroying a neighborhood in San Bruno, California. Eight people were killed and more than sixty injured in the disaster, which left a crater several stories deep and 122 meters wide. Thomas’s group, United for Action, and other opponents fear that a similar accident, or terrorist attack, could kill hundreds. Among the entities that have filed suit to stop the pipeline is Jersey City, New Jersey, across the Hudson River, where the pipeline travels under schools, hospitals and chemical plants.

Advocates and detractors

New York State and city officials, including New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, say the pipeline poses no threat. "I’m not an expert on this pipeline or pipeline technology, but we have pipelines running under half of America. If they were that dangerous, we’d have a lot of fires," he said.

Deputy Mayor for Operations Caswell Holloway, a former commissioner of environmental protection, seconded Bloomberg.  "We reviewed it for safety. We reviewed it for environmental impacts. It is being built to exceed the highest-rated standards," he said, adding that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which has ultimate authority, also approved the project.

But opponents say pipeline accidents happen almost weekly in the U.S., although mostly in unpopulated areas. Claire Donahue, who founded a group called the Sane Energy Project to oppose the Spectra pipeline, said that energy companies themselves pay for environmental impact studies, and that regulations are so lax as to be meaningless. The requirement for this pipeline is that it be inspected only once every seven years, she said.

"There are 88 inspectors for 2.5 million miles of pipelines. The primary way that pipelines are inspected is to walk over the route looking for dead grass. I’m not making that up. We’re in a place, a cement area, the pipe is under a river, it is under a highway, it is under sidewalks. You tell me how they are going to know that it is leaking," said Donahue.

Health, environmental concerns

Pipeline opponents also are concerned about radon, a radioactive gas that is more concentrated in natural gas extracted from shale formations deep underground. Radon decays in about two weeks’ time, but opponents say it will not have more than a few days to diminish before reaching New York. Spectra Energy maps show the new pipeline carrying gas mainly extracted from the nearby Marcellus Shale formation in Pennsylvania and New York.

Al Appleton, a former New York City commissioner of environmental protection, charged in a recent forum that city and state officials have been negligent in not investigating the issue. "The radon level in that natural gas could be as much as 20 to 60 times higher than the levels to which we’re currently exposed, which means a huge spike in your risk for things like lung cancer," he said. He noted that most New Yorkers live in apartment buildings constructed for gas-stove cooking only.

An analysis commissioned by Spectra Energy, however, found that the pipeline's gas will not bring dangerous levels of radon into New Yorkers’ homes or businesses. The study, by biophysicist Lynn R. Anspaugh, said that a study cited by opponents overestimated the amount of radon at both wellheads and after transmission. It also noted that the lead federal regulatory agencies involved, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy, both concluded there will be no health hazard to users of the natural gas brought by the pipeline. Spectra Energy statements also have said that the pipeline will be operated with multiple safeguards, including robotic checks of the pipeline, and that it poses no danger either of explosion or radon.

The lawsuits brought by opponents will be heard in federal court in the fall, right before the pipeline is set to begin operating. Meanwhile, opposition is building to other new natural gas infrastructure proposed for the New York area, including another high-pressure pipeline into the seaside Rockaway neighborhood, which was badly damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Opponents say that global warming is responsible for storms like Sandy, and that remaining deposits of gas and oil must be left in the ground, in order to stave off even greater climate disasters.

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by: MikePB from: New York
June 03, 2013 8:22 AM
For a preview of how Spectra Energy’s track record will play out with the NYC pipeline, talk to folks who live with Spectra Energy today. Despite platitudes about safety, Spectra Energy does not have a best-in-class track record that might build confidence among NYC residents. Spectra Energy has a long, documented record of problems. It includes violations, explosions and fines (including a 15 million dollar federal fine). For example, much of the pipeline gas will come from Spectra Energy’s underground storage reservoir called Steckman Ridge, in Bedford County, PA, about 2 hours from Washington, DC.

This facility is a 12-billion cubic feet underground natural gas storage reservoir with a 5,000 horsepower compressor station, 13 injection/withdrawal wells and related pipeline infrastructure. It has had an ongoing series of problems since it went online in 2009.The most recent incident occurred in March. Residents were so concerned about loud noise (which lasted 2-3 hours) and what appeared to be smoke coming from the compressor station they called 911.

How did Spectra Energy react to its “stakeholders” concerns? Ms. Hanley (quoted in this article) called from nearly 500 miles away in the greater Boston area to dismiss residents concerns: "Nothing was released. There was no smoke. No incident.” The next day, Spectra Energy was forced to flip-flop because residents kept pressing for answers. As it turned out, there was a release of methane and other hydrocarbons; but so far the company refuses to publicly say how much or exactly why this happened. For more information, check out this well-sourced link: http://www.spectraenergywatch.com/blog/?p=1807


by: Stephanie Low from: NYC
June 01, 2013 1:05 AM
Unfortunately, industry assurances about pipeline safety have often proven overblown, not to say downright untrue. Quoting from Spectra Energy’s statement in the article above that “the pipeline will be operated with multiple safeguards, including robotic checks of the pipeline," those robotic checks refer to a Pipeline Inspection Gauge (PIG) that investigative reporter Greg Palast exposed 18 months ago as having been industry-tailored NOT to report cracks, leaks and corrosion expensive to repair as well as likely to cause explosions. You can check out the story at this link: http://www.democraticunderground.com/1002241517
Not a reassuring possibility when Spectra’s own record, according to the government agency PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration), includes “17 inadequacies in its pipeline safety operations and procedures” and has been found to be ”inadequate in a number of areas, including continuing pipeline surveillance, emergency plans, and welding procedures.” http://www.naturalgaswatch.org/?p=744
How did this terribly dangerous project get so far along the way without official oversight and investigation? Will our city officials act in time to eliminate the possibility of explosion and death in Chelsea?

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