News / Africa

Nigeria Islamists Attack Villages, Church Near Chibok, 15 dead

Burnt-out cars are seen at the scene of a blast in Abuja, June 25, 2014. At least 21 people were killed when a suspected bomb tore through a crowded shopping district in the Nigerian capital Abuja during rush hour on Wednesday, police said, adding to the
Burnt-out cars are seen at the scene of a blast in Abuja, June 25, 2014. At least 21 people were killed when a suspected bomb tore through a crowded shopping district in the Nigerian capital Abuja during rush hour on Wednesday, police said, adding to the
Reuters

Suspected Islamist militants killed at least 15 people on Sunday in an attack on two Nigerian villages, including one targeting worshippers at a church, a few kilometers (three miles) from Chibok, the scene of a mass abduction of more than 200 school girls.

Violence in Nigeria's northeast has been relentless in the past year, and has gained in intensity since April, when more than 200 schoolgirls were snatched by Boko Haram rebels from Chibok. Efforts to free them, which have attracted Western support, have so far not succeeded.

In a separate assault on Friday evening, insurgents killed seven soldiers in the village of Goniri, in Yobe state, a security source and witnesses said.

The attackers on Sunday made simultaneous strikes on two villages in the Chibok community, in Borno state.

Samuel Chibok, a survivor of the attack on Kautikiri village, about five km from where the girls were snatched, said that around 20 men in a Toyota pick-up truck and motorcycles rolled into town. They sprayed it with bullets, focusing much of their fire power on panicked worshippers in a local church.

“Initially I thought they were military but when I came out, they were firing at people. I saw people fleeing and they burned our houses,” he said, adding that some people had died in the attack, including two of his relatives.

“Smoke was billowing from our town as I left.”

A local pro-government vigilante, who declined to be named, said residents had now recovered 15 bodies from the village.

Boko Haram often attacks institutions it sees as against its strict version of Sunni Islam, including churches, bars and non-religious schools that teach Western ideas like science.

Another attack on Kwada, eight km (five miles) from Chibok village, left some people dead, a security source operating in the area said, although the toll was not yet clear.

Heavy death toll 

Boko Haram, which is fighting for an Islamic state in largely Muslim northern Nigeria, has killed thousands since launching an uprising on 2009, and many hundreds in the past three months.

It is by far the biggest security threat to Africa's biggest economy and top oil producer, and has overshadowed government efforts to project an image of Nigeria as a prospective economic giant.

An explosion on Friday night in a brothel in the northeastern Nigerian city of Bauchi killed 11 people and wounded 28, police said on Saturday. This attack was also believed to be the work of Boko Haram.

A military operation in the northeast has so far failed to quell the rebellion and has triggered reprisal attacks that are increasingly targeting civilians, after they formed vigilante groups to try to help the government flush out the militants.

But their tactics - often striking then fleeing over the border into Cameroon - have repeatedly proved devastating. They are well armed and funded by a lucrative kidnapping operation.

In Friday night's attack on a military outpost, suspected Boko Haram fighters arrived in four armored personel carriers and 11 Hilux trucks mounted with anti-aircraft guns, said a security source and a witness who gave his name only as Hamisu.

“They were all dressed in full military but they did not direct their onslaught on the civilian population,” Hamisu said by telephone.

The militants are extending their reach beyond their remote northeastern heartlands. A bomb in an upmarket shopping district of the capital Abuja killed 21 people on Wednesday, the third attack on the capital in three months.

President Goodluck Jonathan said Nigeria had entered one of the darkest phases of its history during a visit to the scene of the Abuja blast on Friday.

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by: Louis Edward Brown
June 29, 2014 1:39 PM
If there was one area in this whole country where the military should have forces present it should be around this area if for no other reason than the symbolism it would project. The government of Nigeria is beyond pathetic and incompetent. But what is worse is that the world community is standing passively by and allowing this horror to continue.

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