News / Africa

Nigeria Boko Haram Crisis Escalates in 2013

Nigeria Boko Haram Crisis Escalates in 2013i
X
December 17, 2013 12:18 AM
2013 was supposed to be the year that ended Boko Haram, an Islamist insurgent group that has been terrorizing northern Nigeria for four years. Heather Murdock reports for VOA from Maiduguri thousands of troops were sent to three northeastern states to battle insurgents, but the violence continues and the region remains under emergency rule.
Heather Murdock
2013 was supposed to be the year that ended Boko Haram, an Islamist insurgent group that has been terrorizing northern Nigeria for four years.  Thousands of troops were sent to three northeastern states to battle insurgents, but the violence continues and the region remains under emergency rule.  

At the beginning of the year, war in Mali dominated the news from West Africa.
But in May, Nigeria's President, Goodluck Jonathan said insurgency in Nigeria was escalating.  Boko Haram had captured territories.  Ongoing attacks, assassinations and kidnappings amounted to a declaration of war.  Jonathan declared a state of emergency in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states, directing his military chief of staff to immediately deploy more troops to those areas.  

It was Nigeria’s largest offensive against Boko Haram.  In the first six months of the state of emergency, the military secured northern cities, but attacks continued in the countryside.

Army spokesperson Colonel Muhammad Dole told reporters his troops had cut off basic supplies to Boko Haram.

“We were also able to cut most of their supplies so the attack on villages so the attack on villages is a desperation so they can survive.  They do not have food.  They do not have water,"  said Dole who added that he believed some insurgents had fled to neighboring countries.  

In November, the United States declared Boko Haram and splinter group Ansaru foreign terrorist organizations.  Emergency rule was extended for another six months.
Two weeks later, residents of Maiduguri, the original home of the insurgency, said they felt safe for the first time in years.   

“Since then, we did not hear of any insurgents, any cheating around.  So we can say life is better now," said Dauda Tatally, who owns a small computer supply shop in Maiduguri..

But in early December, the feeling of safety in Maiduguri vanished after militants attacked the air force, the army and the police.

The military imposed a 24-hour curfew for the first time in years.  The attack left an army and a police base destroyed and dozens of cars and oil trucks burnt out.  Air force soldiers refused journalists entry to their base.

Fighting takes a heavy toll

Human Rights Watch says Boko Haram has killed thousands of people in the past four years and heavy-handed tactics by security forces have killed hundreds more.

Researcher Eric Guttschuss says inter-community violence has also killed thousands of people in past four years and that the government’s failure to prosecute offenders is feeding the Boko Haram crisis.

“One of reasons to that they have used to justify these attacks is to say ‘When Muslims were attacked in Plateau State, for example, those who carried out the attacks, nothing happened to them and the government turned a blind eye," he said.
 
More violence between religious, political and tribal groups is expected next year before Nigeria’s 2015 presidential elections.

The Nigerian military says it continues to battle the group, killing Boko Haram fighters in shootouts and air raids.

But in the countryside, locals say people are still being killed, homes are still being burned and they still live in constant fear.

You May Like

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said To Be Improving

Experimental drugs have been tried on six people: three Westerners and now, three African pyhysicians More

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities residents rebuild their lives, but many say everyone is being treated with suspicion More

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

Girls learn to object; FGM practitioners face penalties from jail sentences to stiff fines More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Franca French from: Grambling Louisiana
December 17, 2013 10:36 PM
Nigeria is not Baba country. Baba is the only Nigeria cadet that failed basic officers' training in Sandhurst this implies that Baba is not a smart man. Baba is the handiwork of late Dr.Ukpabi Asika and General Gowon. Baba is a grand wizard of Ogboni cult which he sometimes mistakes for born again christain.


by: afolabi kuti from: sagamu ogun syate
December 17, 2013 5:29 AM
Baba Iyabo has told mr president to borrow is formular to dis boko haramu bcus de time of baba there is. Peace no nosense nig neen the type of Obasanjo ( if only baba can rule nigerial is welcom .oo

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improvingi
X
Carol Pearson
August 19, 2014 11:43 PM
The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improving

The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As the Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities from pro-Russian separatists, residents are getting a chance to rebuild their lives. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the town of Kramatorsk in Donetsk province, where a sense of fear is still in the air, and distrust of the government in Kyiv still runs deep.
Video

Video China Targets Overseas Assets of Corrupt Officials

As China presses forward with its anti-graft effort, authorities are targeting corrupt officials who have sent family members and assets overseas. The efforts have stirred up a debate at home on exactly how many officials take that route and how likely it is they will be caught. Rebecca Valli has this report.
Video

Video Leading The Fight Against Islamic State, Kurds Question Iraqi Future

Western countries including the United States have begun arming the Kurdish Peshmerga forces in northern Iraq to aid their battle against extremist Sunni militants from the Islamic State. But there are concerns that a heavily-armed Kurdistan Regional Government, or KRG, might seek to declare independence and cause the break-up of the Iraqi state. As Henry Ridgwell reports from London, the KRG says it will only seek greater autonomy from Baghdad.
Video

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

In some Kenyan communities, female genital mutilation remains a rite of passage. But activists are pushing back, with education for girls and with threats of punishment those who perform the circumcision. Mohammed Yusuf looks at the practice in the rural eastern community of Tharaka-Nithi.
Video

Video For Obama, Racial Violence is Personal Issue

The racial violence in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is presenting U.S. President Barack Obama with an issue to which he has a deep personal connection. To many Americans, Obama's election as America's first black president marked a turning point in race relations in the United States, and Obama has made ending the violence a policy priority. On Monday he issued a new call for calm and understanding. Luis Ramirez reports from the White House.
Video

Video Clinton-Obama Relationship Could Impact 2016 Election

President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have a long and complicated relationship. That relationship took another turn recently when Clinton criticized the president’s foreign policy. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone reports there is renewed attention on the Clinton-Obama relationship as Hillary Clinton considers running for
Video

Video Iran Looks to Maintain Influence in Baghdad With New Shia PM

Washington and Tehran share the goal of stopping Syrian-based militants in Iraq. But experts say it's Iran, not the United States, that will most influence how the new government in Baghdad approaches internal reforms and the war in Syria. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.

AppleAndroid