News / Africa

Nigerian Official Praises US Cooperation in Fight against Terrorism

President Barack Obama meets with Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in New York, Sept. 23, 2013.
President Barack Obama meets with Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan in New York, Sept. 23, 2013.
Peter Clottey
The United States declaration of Boko Haram and Ansaru as foreign terrorist organizations is a significant boost to Nigeria’s effort to end their violent campaigns, says Rueben Abati, Special Adviser on Media and Publicity to President Goodluck Jonathan.

Abati says the US’ action deepens a strong collaboration with the West African nation, in the fight against global terrorism. The designation denies the groups access to U.S. financial institutions and allows banks to freeze assets held in the United States.

“What the US has done is an expression of further support for what the Nigerian authorities are doing, and a clear indication indeed that tackling terrorism is a global responsibility,” said Abati. “For the Nigerian government this is a welcome and constructive development, and it provides further opportunities for deepening the existing collaboration between both countries in dealing with the scourge of terrorism and insurgency.”

In a meeting in October, Presidents Barack Obama and Jonathan discussed violence perpetrated by armed groups, including Boko Haram in some parts of Nigeria.  Abati said both countries have demonstrated determination to defeat terrorism in the West African country.

“Both Abuja and Washington will work together to make sure that terrorism does not continue to pose a threat to human progress in Nigeria or in any parts of the world. So there is that existing understanding, and what has happened now just takes it further,” said Abati.

Abati also says the designation strengthens the Nigeria administration’s efforts to thwart violence often carried out by Boko Haram and Ansaru, which creates chaos and insecurity in several parts of the West African country.

“It reinforces the position of Nigeria, and puts to end terrorism, [from] the insurgencies to the proliferation of small arms and light weapons….[It] is something that requires the cooperation of the international community,” said Abati. “What has happened is clearly a demonstration of that -- that wherever it exists, terrorism is a threat not just to the immediate community, but [also] to the entire world.” 

Abati said that the country will hold Boko Haram accountable for the committing gross human rights violations against the people of Nigeria.

Last June, the Nigerian government designated Islamic sect Boko Haram a terrorist organization.

Earlier this year, the government declared a state of emergency in some Nigeria northern states as a strategy to curb violence perpetrated by Boko Haram. The measure has been renewed for a six month period, according to Abati.

“The security agencies have shown great capacity in containing this scourge, in routing the terrorists and displacing them, and making it impossible for them to continue to challenge the sovereignty of the Nigerian state,’ said Abati.

Critics however say the Nigerian government has failed to rein in the violence and insecurity in parts of the country. They accused the administration of failing its core constitutional mandate of protecting civilians from harm. Abati disagreed.

“That will be an incorrect assessment,” said Abati. “A fair assessment would be a commendation of the efforts of the Jonathan administration, to ensure the security and welfare of all Nigerians…a lot of successes have been recorded and the administration nothing, but commendation. Normalcy has been restored to [some] states [and] the threat of terrorism has reduced.”
Clottey interview with Rueben Abati, President Jonathan's adviser
Clottey interview with Rueben Abati, President Jonathan's adviseri
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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
November 18, 2013 9:19 AM
Boko haram is an arm of government in Jonathan's administration, though it was created by his opponents whom he defeated in the elections. Mr. president is using the boko haram saga to vote much more money for his administration. In this country, security, though very important, is one drain pipe which politicians use to siphon money away to foreign banks. There is no accountability, no ceiling to its fund allocation; it is open ended. From such monies they pay those fomenting the troubles, and ill-equip security operatives to be ineffective in tackling security challenges. The Nigerian police is shared to guide politicians and families, with the remnant distributed to watch establishments like banks and companies etc.

A few unfavored others still go unchecked to do "road block", collecting "bush allowances" and illegal toll fees (tips) especially from motorists and anyone else who has the misfortune of falling into their trap. The country is largely left in the hands of miscreants for their escapades. It is the political ruling class's fault to leave the larger countryside un-policed which accords hooligans the impetus to cruise the country with impunity. Until Nigeria returns to proper policing, reinstate and invigorate the CID/plain clothes detectives department, the likes of boko haram and ansaru will continue to defy security in the country.

by: Osuagw
November 17, 2013 10:03 AM
The ambivalence of most governments of Northern Nigeria over federal government attempts to control the boko haram terrorists is very disturbing and ominous. Could boko haram be enjoying the support of the northern Nigerian eminent politicians or could the boko haram have been let loose by the said politicians and state government ?

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