News / Middle East

19 Killed in Aleppo Gun Battle

Free Syrian Army fighters carry the body of a fellow fighter after he was shot by a sniper at Seif a Dawla district in Syria's northwestern city of Aleppo September 4, 2012.
Free Syrian Army fighters carry the body of a fellow fighter after he was shot by a sniper at Seif a Dawla district in Syria's northwestern city of Aleppo September 4, 2012.
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VOA News
Activists say Syrian forces have killed at least 19 people, including seven children, when they shelled rebel-controlled areas of the commercial capital, Aleppo.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Wednesday that 10 civilians were killed in the southern neighborhood of Bustan al-Qasr while a total of nine bodies, including those of the children, were found in the Marjeh and Hanano areas.

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Other opposition groups said the death toll in the strategic northern city was as high as 43, including women and children. VOA cannot confirm events on the ground in Syria because the government severely restricts access for international journalists.

Rebel fighters on July 20 opened a new front in the Syrian conflict by launching an attack on Aleppo. The army has since dislodged them from several sectors, including one of their main strongholds Salaheddin, but pockets of resistance remain.

Diplomacy

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, right, shake hands during her visit to Beijing, Sept. 4, 2012.U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, right, shake hands during her visit to Beijing, Sept. 4, 2012.
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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, right, shake hands during her visit to Beijing, Sept. 4, 2012.
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, left, and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, right, shake hands during her visit to Beijing, Sept. 4, 2012.
Also Wednesday, talks between U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Chinese leaders failed to narrow gaps on how to end the crisis in Syria. Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi said Beijing backs a "political transition" in Syria to end worsening bloodshed after 18 months of unrest, but repeated China's opposition to forceful foreign intervention in the crisis.

Comments from Clinton and Yang showed the countries remain deeply divided on those issues, although both maintained they are committed to working together despite their differences.
 
The United States and other countries are upset that China and Russia have repeatedly used their veto powers in the U.N. Security Council to block actions that could have led to sanctions against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's government. China says Syria's civil war needs to be resolved through negotiations and not outside pressure.
 
Yang told a news conference with Clinton in Beijing Wednesday that "history will judge that China's position on the Syria question is a promotion of the appropriate handling of the situation."

Clinton acknowledged it is "no secret" the U.S. government is disappointed by Chinese and Russian policy on Syria and repeated that the best course of action remains tough U.N. Security Council measures.

Weapons

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moonU.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
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U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
In New York Tuesday, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged governments to stop sending weapons to Syria, saying they are only adding to the misery. Ban told the General Assembly that arming Syrian soldiers and the rebels adds to the risk of unintended consequences as the fighting spreads.

Russia has been a long-time supplier of weapons to the Syrian government while Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Turkey have sent arms to the opposition.

Ban also said the humanitarian situation in Syrian is grave and getting worse. Ban told the diplomats that U.N. efforts to help Syrian refugees are badly underfunded, with only half the money needed contributed so far.

Jordan, Iraq, Lebanon and Turkey have opened their borders to camps for Syrian refugees. Ban said these governments have been generous and urgently need more support.

The United Nations says 100,000 Syrians fled the country in August, the highest monthly total since the conflict began last year. U.N. refugee agency spokeswoman Melissa Fleming says 235,000 Syrians live in refugee camps. But officials say the true number of refugees may be much higher because not everyone has registered with camp authorities.

Photo Gallery: Latest Images from Syria

  • This image made from video provided by Shaam News Network (SNN) and accessed by the Associated Press on Tuesday, September 4, 2012 purports to show people walking through rubble after shelling in Idlib, Syria.
  • Residents inspect the damage after what was said to be an air raid by Syrian government forces near Azaz, September 3, 2012.
  • A Syrian child stands next to rebel fighters checking a house that was damaged in bombing by government forces in Marea, on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria, September 4, 2012.
  • A Syrian rebel fighter prepares his AK-47 before going on patrol in Marea, on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria, September 4, 2012.
  • A view shows the wreckage after a car bomb exploded in the Jaramana district of southeast Damascus September 3, 2012, in this photograph released by Syria's national news agency SANA.
  • Civilians wait to receive food rations in the Bab Al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz. At the Azaz-Kilis crossing, Syrians described dire conditions for refugees still trapped on the other side of the border.
  • Syrian Hamzah Abu Bakri, displays portraits of his brothers who were killed last week while standing by their vegetable shop in Aleppo, Syria, September 2, 2012.
  • Boys play on a Syrian military tank (destroyed during fighting with the rebels), in Azaz, September 2, 2012.
  • A Syrian refugee hangs clothes to dry at Zaatari Refugee Camp, in Mafraq, Jordan, September 2, 2012.
  • Syrian barbers who fled their homes shave the heads of other displaced men at the Bab Al-Salameh border crossing, in hopes of entering one of the refugee camps in Turkey.
  • A civilian pushes a baby stroller containing his belongings as he flees the El Edaa district in Aleppo, September 2, 2012.


Timeline: Syrian Conflict
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by: Anonymous
September 06, 2012 11:55 PM
Looks like now the FSA has to create some large groups and go take out some military air bases.

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