News / Asia

China: Debris Matches Colors of Missing Jet

Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein gestures as he speaks about the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, The Everly Hotel, Putrajaya, March 29, 2014.
Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein gestures as he speaks about the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, The Everly Hotel, Putrajaya, March 29, 2014.
Ron Corben
Chinese planes have spotted objects in the Indian Ocean bearing the same colors as the missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

Investigators, however, say those objects and others that have been pulled from the water cannot be confirmed as debris from the jet.

Vessels from six nations, including China and Australia, scoured the southern Indian Ocean Saturday in stepped-up efforts to locate a missing Malaysian jet 21 days after it disappeared on a flight to Beijing. Malaysia's acting transport minister, Hishamuddin Hussein, is trying to reassure families of the missing passengers and crew that the international team deployed on the sea and in the skies remained committed to the search.

With the search for missing Malaysia Air Flight 370 now entering its fourth week, Hishamuddin Hussein says all 26 nations involved remained committed to the task despite the frustrating lack of any definite evidence showing what happened to the plane.
Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014
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Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014
Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014
The search currently is centered about 1,600 kilometers southwest of Perth, Australia,  in the Indian Ocean's Southern Corridor — a band of open water circling the globe where high winds and waves are common.

On Saturday during an emotional meeting with families of the passengers and crew from flight MH370 Hishamuddin reassured relatives there would be no let-up in the search.

"They know that it's not just a Malaysian effort; it's a global effort. They know [the search is] in the Southern Corridor. Australia is taking the lead. We've got the latest P8 Poseidon and Orion [planes] up there. We've got a Chinese aircraft — the latest, never seen outside the [country] before — landing in Perth; 26 nations working together," he said.

Australia's Maritime Safety Authority said eight aircraft flew over the search area Saturday, including a Chinese Air Force Ilyushin IL-76, three Australian air force P3 Orions and aircraft from Japan and New Zealand.

​The new search area followed "credible leads" of a possible crash site for the Boeing 777 jetliner, based on new data showing the plane had been traveling faster than earlier estimated, so it would have exhausted its fuel supply sooner and if — as is now believed — it plunged into the sea late early on March 8.

As six or more ships began traveling through the new search area Saturday, the Chinese news agency Xinhua said spotters aboard Chinese planes sighted three objects bobbing in the water near each other — one white, one red and one orange — that could be from the Malaysian airliner. The current search area has an overall size of 319,000 square kilometers.

Malaysia's Hishamuddin says there is little to no hope that anyone survived the plane's plunge into some of the most desolate waters in the world's oceans, but that he pledged to the families that the search would go on, and that he would "hope against hope" for positive results.

"They said that no matter how remote — hope against hope — please will you continue to [search for] survivors," he said. "And I have said that from the beginning that no matter how remote, I'm always hoping against hope and I'm praying, and the [search and rescue] is also, in any remote manner, has always been to find for survivors."

Story continues below photo gallery:
  • The Bluefin 21, the Artemis autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), is hoisted back on board the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield after a successful buoyancy test in the southern Indian Ocean as part of the continuing search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, April 4, 2014.
  • Flight Lieutenant Stephen Graham monitors a TAC station onboard a Royal New Zealand Air Force P3 Orion during search operations for wreckage and debris of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean, near the coast of Western Australia, April 4, 2014.
  • Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force Commander Hidetsugu Iwamasa speaks to the press in front of one of their P-3C Orion aircraft currently at RAAF Base Pearce near Perth, Australia, April 4, 2014.
  • Relatives of Chinese passengers on board the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 pray in a prayer room, Beijing, China, April 4, 2014.
  • Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak tour RAAF Base Pearce, near Perth, April 3, 2014.
  • Steve Wang a representative from the committee for relatives of Chinese passengers onboard Flight MH370 talks to journalists after a closed door meeting with Malaysian officials via teleconference in Beijing, April 2, 2014.
  • A crew member sits in the cockpit of a Royal New Zealand Air Force patrol aircraft as it continues searching in the southern Indian Ocean for Flight MH370, April 1, 2014.
  • Koji Kubota of the Japan Coast Guard keeps watch while flying in the search zone for debris from Flight MH370, April 1, 2014.
  • A Buddhist monk welcomes Chinese relatives of passengers on Flight MH370 as they arrive to pray at a Buddhist temple in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, March 31, 2014.
  • Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott addresses the international forces currently based in Perth searching for Flight MH370 during his visit to RAAF Base Pearce, March 31, 2014.

The flight from Kuala Lumpur had 239 passengers and crew on board — more than half them Chinese — when the jet mysteriously veered off its flight path and both of its transponders were deliberately shut off.

Without the data that transponders routinely supply, the search has relied on satellite technology — position estimates gathered by triangulating "pings" transmitted by the Boeing jet's engines — and further data analysis.

On Sunday, the Australian navy vessel Ocean Shield will take on board a towed pinger locator and a submersible drone, with American military personnel to operate them. The team hopes to capture signals from flight recorders aboard Flight MH370 before the batteries powering those devices are exhausted.

Some information for this report comes from AP.
 

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: wylder chase from: United States
March 30, 2014 3:00 PM
I dowsed out these coordinates -34, 59…a little further north and west of where they are currently searching.

by: Noorullah from: Afghhanisyan
March 30, 2014 5:19 AM
This is the most astonishing news for me that in 21st century beside all the promotion of technology the world is still not able to find the big plane. I ask the USA to help and cooperate searching team while claims in Afghanistan that by air operation we can even recognize a needle on the earth surface too.

by: Anonymous
March 30, 2014 1:46 AM
There are so many possibilities at this point that it has reached a level that people need to know what really happened and it looks like a cover up that we will never know what the truth really is.

by: Alu from: pek
March 29, 2014 8:58 PM
It is more better to manage open the Malaysia officers mouths than spend much more effort in scouting. In addition, the missed airplane must spent most time in Malaysia territorial realm. Malaysia intelligence must know that.
In Response

by: bernard from: new zealand
April 01, 2014 8:17 PM
latest wreckage from indian ocean large debris with 370 on it but this can not be confirmed as from the plane, that will take experts months . some experts they sound like morons .
In Response

by: bernard from: new zealand
April 01, 2014 3:59 PM
latest wreckage from indian ocean large debris with 370 on it but this can not be confirmed as from the plane, that will take experts months . some experts they sound like morons .
In Response

by: Anonymous
March 30, 2014 4:20 PM
I am job to the be greatest and for the America not in wat planes crashing for time of missing place
In Response

by: bernard from: new zealand
March 30, 2014 2:58 PM
latest wreckage from indian ocean large debris with 370 on it but this can not be confirmed as from the plane, that will take experts months . some experts they sound like morons .
In Response

by: Anonymous
March 30, 2014 7:56 AM
some political scheme plot may be exist

by: Mary wang from: chinese
March 29, 2014 7:46 PM
Wats going on in the world to day this is the second time a plane went missing wat are the militery doing about it

by: meanbill from: USA
March 29, 2014 11:52 AM
CRAZY? ... I still believe the hijacked plane is in a big hanger, on a big airfield being repainted and refitted with extra fuel tanks, to make it another "Super Ranger" with a nautical flight range of over 10,000 miles, for an unknown mission....
IF that be true, I hope whoever hijacked the plane, spares the planes passengers on board the plane....
AND it's just to hard to believe, that someone would hijack a plane to crash it in the ocean.... (but I could be wrong?)...
In Response

by: Anonymous
March 29, 2014 6:31 PM
Your theories are just plain crazy, similar to alex jones. Noone would believe that theory. Jet fighters approaching a country are always detected, a jumbo jet even bigger, and easy target to shoot down.

A suicidal pilot with a big insurance plan might be the reason, and sounds more realistic. Knowing where to dump the plane so that nobody would find it (and flying below radar). Because if it was found easily the black box would point the finger at the pilot.

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