News / Asia

    China: Debris Matches Colors of Missing Jet

    Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein gestures as he speaks about the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, The Everly Hotel, Putrajaya, March 29, 2014.
    Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein gestures as he speaks about the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, The Everly Hotel, Putrajaya, March 29, 2014.
    Ron Corben
    Chinese planes have spotted objects in the Indian Ocean bearing the same colors as the missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

    Investigators, however, say those objects and others that have been pulled from the water cannot be confirmed as debris from the jet.

    Vessels from six nations, including China and Australia, scoured the southern Indian Ocean Saturday in stepped-up efforts to locate a missing Malaysian jet 21 days after it disappeared on a flight to Beijing. Malaysia's acting transport minister, Hishamuddin Hussein, is trying to reassure families of the missing passengers and crew that the international team deployed on the sea and in the skies remained committed to the search.

    With the search for missing Malaysia Air Flight 370 now entering its fourth week, Hishamuddin Hussein says all 26 nations involved remained committed to the task despite the frustrating lack of any definite evidence showing what happened to the plane.
    Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014
    x
    Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014
    Malaysia Airlines flight MH 370 search area as of March 28, 2014
    The search currently is centered about 1,600 kilometers southwest of Perth, Australia,  in the Indian Ocean's Southern Corridor — a band of open water circling the globe where high winds and waves are common.

    On Saturday during an emotional meeting with families of the passengers and crew from flight MH370 Hishamuddin reassured relatives there would be no let-up in the search.

    "They know that it's not just a Malaysian effort; it's a global effort. They know [the search is] in the Southern Corridor. Australia is taking the lead. We've got the latest P8 Poseidon and Orion [planes] up there. We've got a Chinese aircraft — the latest, never seen outside the [country] before — landing in Perth; 26 nations working together," he said.

    Australia's Maritime Safety Authority said eight aircraft flew over the search area Saturday, including a Chinese Air Force Ilyushin IL-76, three Australian air force P3 Orions and aircraft from Japan and New Zealand.

    ​The new search area followed "credible leads" of a possible crash site for the Boeing 777 jetliner, based on new data showing the plane had been traveling faster than earlier estimated, so it would have exhausted its fuel supply sooner and if — as is now believed — it plunged into the sea late early on March 8.

    As six or more ships began traveling through the new search area Saturday, the Chinese news agency Xinhua said spotters aboard Chinese planes sighted three objects bobbing in the water near each other — one white, one red and one orange — that could be from the Malaysian airliner. The current search area has an overall size of 319,000 square kilometers.

    Malaysia's Hishamuddin says there is little to no hope that anyone survived the plane's plunge into some of the most desolate waters in the world's oceans, but that he pledged to the families that the search would go on, and that he would "hope against hope" for positive results.

    "They said that no matter how remote — hope against hope — please will you continue to [search for] survivors," he said. "And I have said that from the beginning that no matter how remote, I'm always hoping against hope and I'm praying, and the [search and rescue] is also, in any remote manner, has always been to find for survivors."

    Story continues below photo gallery:
    • The Bluefin 21, the Artemis autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), is hoisted back on board the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield after a successful buoyancy test in the southern Indian Ocean as part of the continuing search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, April 4, 2014.
    • Flight Lieutenant Stephen Graham monitors a TAC station onboard a Royal New Zealand Air Force P3 Orion during search operations for wreckage and debris of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean, near the coast of Western Australia, April 4, 2014.
    • Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force Commander Hidetsugu Iwamasa speaks to the press in front of one of their P-3C Orion aircraft currently at RAAF Base Pearce near Perth, Australia, April 4, 2014.
    • Relatives of Chinese passengers on board the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 pray in a prayer room, Beijing, China, April 4, 2014.
    • Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak tour RAAF Base Pearce, near Perth, April 3, 2014.
    • Steve Wang a representative from the committee for relatives of Chinese passengers onboard Flight MH370 talks to journalists after a closed door meeting with Malaysian officials via teleconference in Beijing, April 2, 2014.
    • A crew member sits in the cockpit of a Royal New Zealand Air Force patrol aircraft as it continues searching in the southern Indian Ocean for Flight MH370, April 1, 2014.
    • Koji Kubota of the Japan Coast Guard keeps watch while flying in the search zone for debris from Flight MH370, April 1, 2014.
    • A Buddhist monk welcomes Chinese relatives of passengers on Flight MH370 as they arrive to pray at a Buddhist temple in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, March 31, 2014.
    • Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott addresses the international forces currently based in Perth searching for Flight MH370 during his visit to RAAF Base Pearce, March 31, 2014.

    The flight from Kuala Lumpur had 239 passengers and crew on board — more than half them Chinese — when the jet mysteriously veered off its flight path and both of its transponders were deliberately shut off.

    Without the data that transponders routinely supply, the search has relied on satellite technology — position estimates gathered by triangulating "pings" transmitted by the Boeing jet's engines — and further data analysis.

    On Sunday, the Australian navy vessel Ocean Shield will take on board a towed pinger locator and a submersible drone, with American military personnel to operate them. The team hopes to capture signals from flight recorders aboard Flight MH370 before the batteries powering those devices are exhausted.

    Some information for this report comes from AP.
     

    You May Like

    Escalation of Media Crackdown in Turkey Heightens Concerns

    Critics see 'a new dark age' as arrests of journalists, closures of media outlets by Erdogan government mount

    Russia Boasts of Troop Buildup on Flank, Draws Flak

    Russian military moves counter to efforts to de-escalate tensions, State Department says

    Video Iraqis Primed to March on Mosul, Foreign Minister Says

    Iraqi FM Ibrahim al-Jaafari tells VOA the campaign will meet optimistic expectations, even though US officials remain cautious

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: wylder chase from: United States
    March 30, 2014 3:00 PM
    I dowsed out these coordinates -34, 59…a little further north and west of where they are currently searching.

    by: Noorullah from: Afghhanisyan
    March 30, 2014 5:19 AM
    This is the most astonishing news for me that in 21st century beside all the promotion of technology the world is still not able to find the big plane. I ask the USA to help and cooperate searching team while claims in Afghanistan that by air operation we can even recognize a needle on the earth surface too.

    by: Anonymous
    March 30, 2014 1:46 AM
    There are so many possibilities at this point that it has reached a level that people need to know what really happened and it looks like a cover up that we will never know what the truth really is.

    by: Alu from: pek
    March 29, 2014 8:58 PM
    It is more better to manage open the Malaysia officers mouths than spend much more effort in scouting. In addition, the missed airplane must spent most time in Malaysia territorial realm. Malaysia intelligence must know that.
    In Response

    by: bernard from: new zealand
    April 01, 2014 8:17 PM
    latest wreckage from indian ocean large debris with 370 on it but this can not be confirmed as from the plane, that will take experts months . some experts they sound like morons .
    In Response

    by: bernard from: new zealand
    April 01, 2014 3:59 PM
    latest wreckage from indian ocean large debris with 370 on it but this can not be confirmed as from the plane, that will take experts months . some experts they sound like morons .
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    March 30, 2014 4:20 PM
    I am job to the be greatest and for the America not in wat planes crashing for time of missing place
    In Response

    by: bernard from: new zealand
    March 30, 2014 2:58 PM
    latest wreckage from indian ocean large debris with 370 on it but this can not be confirmed as from the plane, that will take experts months . some experts they sound like morons .
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    March 30, 2014 7:56 AM
    some political scheme plot may be exist

    by: Mary wang from: chinese
    March 29, 2014 7:46 PM
    Wats going on in the world to day this is the second time a plane went missing wat are the militery doing about it

    by: meanbill from: USA
    March 29, 2014 11:52 AM
    CRAZY? ... I still believe the hijacked plane is in a big hanger, on a big airfield being repainted and refitted with extra fuel tanks, to make it another "Super Ranger" with a nautical flight range of over 10,000 miles, for an unknown mission....
    IF that be true, I hope whoever hijacked the plane, spares the planes passengers on board the plane....
    AND it's just to hard to believe, that someone would hijack a plane to crash it in the ocean.... (but I could be wrong?)...
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    March 29, 2014 6:31 PM
    Your theories are just plain crazy, similar to alex jones. Noone would believe that theory. Jet fighters approaching a country are always detected, a jumbo jet even bigger, and easy target to shoot down.

    A suicidal pilot with a big insurance plan might be the reason, and sounds more realistic. Knowing where to dump the plane so that nobody would find it (and flying below radar). Because if it was found easily the black box would point the finger at the pilot.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Immigrant Delegate Marvels at Democratic Processi
    X
    Katherine Gypson
    July 27, 2016 6:21 PM
    It’s been a bitter and divisive election season – but first time Indian-American delegate Dr. Shashi Gupta headed to the Democratic National Convention with a sense of hope. VOA’s Katherine Gypson followed this immigrant with the love of U.S. politics all the way to Philadelphia.
    Video

    Video Immigrant Delegate Marvels at Democratic Process

    It’s been a bitter and divisive election season – but first time Indian-American delegate Dr. Shashi Gupta headed to the Democratic National Convention with a sense of hope. VOA’s Katherine Gypson followed this immigrant with the love of U.S. politics all the way to Philadelphia.
    Video

    Video A Life of Fighting Back: Hillary Clinton Shatters Glass Ceiling

    Hillary Clinton made history Thursday, overcoming personal and political setbacks to become the first woman to win the presidential nomination of a major U.S. political party. If she wins in November, she will go from “first lady” to U.S. Senator from New York, to Secretary of State, to “Madam President.” Polls show Clinton is both beloved and despised. White House Correspondent Cindy Saine takes a look at the life of the woman both supporters and detractors agree is a fighter for the ages.
    Video

    Video Dutch Entrepreneurs Turn Rainwater Into Beer

    June has been recorded as one of the wettest months in more than a century in many parts of Europe. To a group of entrepreneurs in Amsterdam the rain came as a blessing, as they used the extra water to brew beer. Serginho Roosblad has more to the story.
    Video

    Video First Time Delegate’s First Day Frustrations

    With thousands of people filling the streets of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the 2016 Democratic National Convention, VOA’s Kane Farabaugh narrowed in on one delegate as she made her first trip to a national party convention. It was a day that was anything but routine for this United States military veteran.
    Video

    Video Commerce Thrives on US-Mexico Border

    At the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this week, the party’s presumptive presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, is expected to attack proposals made by her opponent, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, President Barack Obama hosted his Mexican counterpart, President Enrique Peña Nieto, to underscore the good relations between the two countries. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Tucson.
    Video

    Video Film Helps Save Ethiopian Children Thought to be Cursed

    'Omo Child' looks at effort of African man to stop killings of ‘mingi’ children
    Video

    Video London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunities

    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
    Video

    Video Recycling Lifeline for Lebanon’s Last Glassblowers

    In a small Lebanese coastal town, one family is preserving a craft that stretches back millennia. The art of glass blowing was developed by Phoenicians in the region, and the Khalifehs say they are the only ones keeping the skill alive in Lebanon. But despite teaming up with an eco-entrepreneur and receiving an unexpected boost from the country’s recent trash crisis the future remains uncertain. John Owens reports from Sarafand.
    Video

    Video Migrants Continue to Risk Lives Crossing US Border from Mexico

    In his speech Thursday before the Republican National Convention, the party’s presidential candidate, Donald Trump, reiterated his proposal to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border if elected. Polls show a large percentage of Americans support better control of the nation's southwestern border, but as VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from the border town of Nogales in the Mexican state of Sonora, the situation faced by people trying to cross the border is already daunting.
    Video

    Video In State of Emergency, Turkey’s Erdogan Focuses on Spiritual Movement

    The state of emergency that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has declared is giving him even more power to expand a purge that has seen an estimated 60,000 people either arrested or suspended from their jobs. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports from Istanbul.
    Video

    Video Calm the Waters: US Doubles Down Diplomatic Efforts in ASEAN Meetings

    The United States is redoubling diplomatic efforts and looking to upcoming regional meetings to calm the waters after an international tribunal invalidated the legal basis of Beijing's extensive claims in the South China Sea. VOA State Department correspondent Nike Ching has the story.
    Video

    Video Scientists in Poland Race to Save Honeybees

    Honeybees are in danger worldwide. Causes of what's known as colony collapse disorder range from pesticides and loss of habitat to infections. But scientists in Poland say they are on track to finding a cure for one of the diseases. VOA’s George Putic reports.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora