News / Asia

North Korea Blames US, South for 'Cyber Attack'

A commanding post for war games shows U.S. and South Korean soldiers working together in a U.S. military camp in Seoul, South Korea, March 15, 2013.
A commanding post for war games shows U.S. and South Korean soldiers working together in a U.S. military camp in Seoul, South Korea, March 15, 2013.
After it suffered a two-day outage of all of its websites based in the country, North Korea is accusing the United States and South Korea of conducting a cyber attack against it.

North Korea's state news agency says the country's “internet service bases” were hit by “concentrated and persistent virus attacks” for several days this week.

The Korean Central News Agency blames the United States and South Korea, saying they “will have to take the responsibility for the whole consequences.”

Some Internet users in various countries noted that for most of Wednesday and Thursday all web sites with the dot kp domain suffix were unreachable.

The entire North Korean domain is always blocked by South Korean Internet service providers and reposting such content in the South is a crime.

A spokesman for South Korea's National Intelligence Service, who declined to give his name, tells VOA the spy agency is still trying to trace the source of the unprecedented sustained problem affecting the North's web sites.

Inside the Joint Battle Simulation Center, US Army Garrison Yongsan, Seoul, South Korea, March 15, 2013. (S.L. Herman/VOA)Inside the Joint Battle Simulation Center, US Army Garrison Yongsan, Seoul, South Korea, March 15, 2013. (S.L. Herman/VOA)
x
Inside the Joint Battle Simulation Center, US Army Garrison Yongsan, Seoul, South Korea, March 15, 2013. (S.L. Herman/VOA)
Inside the Joint Battle Simulation Center, US Army Garrison Yongsan, Seoul, South Korea, March 15, 2013. (S.L. Herman/VOA)
North Korea says it cannot be overlooked that it was hit by a cyber attack while the Key Resolve joint military exercises are underway in the South.

South Korea's military Joint Chiefs of Staff says the purported cyber attack on North Korea is not in any way connected to the Key Resolve drill.

The nerve center for the drill is the Korea Battle Simulation Center at the U.S. Army's Yongsan Garrison in the South Korean capital.

It is being led by South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff.

A group of reporters was briefly permitted Friday inside the battle simulation center where U.S. Army Lt. Colonel Elton Roberts explained the facility's purpose.

“It is a computer-assisted war game simulation planned and operated by subject-matter experts. And it's uniquely tailored for each exercise in accordance with the training goals of the commander of the exercised unit,” he said.

It was revealed Friday that a new Wargaming Facility, designed for those playing the role of the North Korean forces, has opened at Suwon Air Base, 30 kilometers south of Seoul.

For Key Resolve, the mock opposing forces are augmented by hundreds of military personnel from South Korea and the United States. They are led by a retired South Korean marine brigadier general.

U.S. Forces Korea's Jude Shea, who is the director of the Korea Battle Simulation Center, was asked if the North Koreans ever win during the exercises.

“Yes, on occasion, the opposing force will win the battle or gain the upper hand. And, of course, that's part of the training benefit because if the good guys always won the amount of training benefit in the exercise would not be nearly as great as if periodically the opposing force does better,” said Shea.

Key Resolve involves more than 3,000 personnel in a total of 11 simulation centers in South Korea, Japan and the United States, linked by computer and video.

Military officials will not release the specific scenario for the computer-simulated training phase of Key Resolve, which began Thursday, but acknowledge the current situation on the Korean peninsula is factored into it.

North Korea has strongly condemned the drill, along with a separate but overlapping joint exercise - Foal Eagle - also involving thousands of forces, calling it a prelude to a nuclear strike on the country.

Pyongyang, in recent days, has stated that the war games in the South compel it to prepare to preemptively conduct a nuclear attack of its own on the United States and South Korea.

A spokesman for South Korea's Ministry of National Defense, Kim Min-seok, declines direct comment on a Seoul newspaper's report that the North has moved (170mm) self-propelled artillery and (240mm) multiple rocket launchers to just across from Baengyeong island on the Yellow Sea frontier.

Kim says such exercises as the current Key Resolve drill help the South to be prepared for all-out provocations by the North.

The Korean peninsula was devastated by a three-year civil war in the early 1950's. A truce agreement has been in effect for 60 years. But North Korea declared effective March 11 that it considered the armistice void.

U.S., South Korean and U.N. officials say the cease-fire pact cannot be abrogated unilaterally and consider that the 1953 armistice is still valid.

Steve Herman

A veteran journalist, Steven L Herman is the Voice of America Asia correspondent.

You May Like

Mood Tense Ahead of Scotland Independence Vote

As race to persuade undecided voters continues, No voters say they believe life in Scotland will slowly improve and do not want to take a risk by endorsing independence More

South Africa’s 'Open Mosque' Admits Everyone, Including Critics

Open Mosque founder plans to welcome gay worshipers and allow women to lead prayers More

Ukrainian Activist in Despair About Future of Her Country

IrIna Dovgan, accused of being a spy and tortured by pro-Russian separatists, is appealing to UN Human Rights Council to support her country More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Sam from: US
March 16, 2013 3:54 PM
International Policy Digest has an interesting article regarding North Korea’s behavior toward the West and how its belligerence is nothing more than a failing regime finally acknowledging their rule is coming to an end.

http://www.internationalpolicydigest.org/2013/03/15/petulant-child-north-korea-and-chastisement/

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
A Dinosaur Fit for Land and Wateri
X
September 17, 2014 8:44 PM
Residents and tourists in Washington D.C. can now examine a life-size replica of an unusual dinosaur that lived almost a hundred million years ago in northern Africa. Scientists say studying the behemoth named Spinosaurus helps them better understand how some prehistoric animals adapted to life on land and in water. The Spinosaurus replica is on display at the National Geographic museum. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video A Dinosaur Fit for Land and Water

Residents and tourists in Washington D.C. can now examine a life-size replica of an unusual dinosaur that lived almost a hundred million years ago in northern Africa. Scientists say studying the behemoth named Spinosaurus helps them better understand how some prehistoric animals adapted to life on land and in water. The Spinosaurus replica is on display at the National Geographic museum. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Iraqi Kurdistan Church Helps Christian Children Cope find shelter in churches in the Kurdish capital, Irbil

In the past six weeks, tens of thousands of Iraqi Christians have been forced to flee their homes by Islamic State militants and find shelter in churches in the Kurdish capital, Irbil. Despite U.S. airstrikes in the region, the prospect of people returning home is still very low and concerns are starting to grow over the impact this is having on the displaced youth. Sebastian Meyer reports from Irbil on how one church is coping.
Video

Video NASA Picks Boeing, SpaceX to Carry Astronauts Into Space

The U.S. space agency, NASA, has chosen Boeing and SpaceX companies to build the next generation of spacecraft that will carry U.S. astronauts to the International Space Station by the year 2017. The deal with private industry enables NASA to end its dependence on Russia to send space crews into low Earth orbit and back. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video Future of Ukrainian Former President's Estate Uncertain

More than six months after Ukraine's former President Viktor Yanukovych fled revolution to Russia, authorities have yet to gain control of his palatial estate. Protesters occupy the grounds and opened it to tourists but they are also refusing to turn it over to the state. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Mezhigirya, just north of Kyiv.
Video

Video China Muslims Work to Change Perceptions After Knife Attacks

China says its has sentenced three men to death and one woman to life in prison for a deadly knife attack in March that left more than 30 dead and 140 injured. Beijing says Muslim militants from China's restive western region of Xinjiang carried out the attacks. Now, more than six months after the incident, residents in the city are still coping with the aftermath. VOA's Bill Ide has more from Kunming.
Video

Video Enviropreneur Seeks to Save the Environment, Empower the Community

Lorna Rutto, a former banker, is now an ‘enviropreneur’ - turning plastic waste into furniture and fences discusses the challenges she faces in Africa with raw materials and the environment.
Video

Video West Trades Accusations Over Ransoms

As world leaders try to forge a common response to the threat posed by Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, there is simmering tension over differing policies on paying ransoms. In the past month, the jihadist group has beheaded two Americans and one Briton. Both countries refuse to pay ransom money. As Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London, there is uncertainty in the approach of some other European nations.
Video

Video Scotland Independence Bid Stokes Global Interest

The people of Scotland are preparing to vote on whether to become independent and break away from the rest of Britain, in a referendum being watched carefully in many other countries. Some see it as a risky experiment; while others hope a successful vote for independence might energize their own separatist demands. Foreign immigrants to Scotland have a front row seat for the vote. VOA’s Henry Ridgwell spoke to some of them in Edinburgh.


Carnage and mayhem are part of daily life in northern Nigeria, the result of a terror campaign by the Islamist group Boko Haram. Fears are growing that Nigeria’s government may not know how to counter it, and may be making things worse. More

AppleAndroid