News / Asia

N. Korean Leader's Uncle Executed

People watch television news showing Jang Song-thaek in court before his excution on December 12, 2013, at the rail station in Seoul, Dec. 13, 2013.
People watch television news showing Jang Song-thaek in court before his excution on December 12, 2013, at the rail station in Seoul, Dec. 13, 2013.
Daniel Schearf
North Korea's state media have announced the execution of leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, for attempting to overthrow the state.

The declaration comes just days after Jang, considered the country's second in command, was publicly ousted from power for alleged disloyalty and corruption.

South Korea says it is now closely watching for further signs of instability in the nuclear-armed North.

Trial, conviction for list of charges

North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency early Friday reported a military tribunal overnight tried and executed Jang Song Thaek.

KCNA said Jang, the uncle of leader Kim Jong Un and assumed second in command, was found guilty of attempting to overthrow the state, party, and leadership.

The article, headlined, “Traitor Jang Song Thaek Executed,” said he committed “counter-revolutionary” acts. It called Jang “human scum” and “worse than a dog.”

Pyongyang's official Rodong Sinmun newspaper showed pictures of Jang standing at the military trial, bowing in submission with guards on both sides.

High level executions rare

Lee Yun-keol is president of the North Korea Strategic Information Service Center, a private research institution. He says the rapid execution demonstrates leader Kim Jong Un has not yet stabilized his grip on power.

He says there has never been a case where someone was executed after a special military trial held by North Korea’s state security department. He says that usually criminals are sent to political camps and receive harsh punishment until their death. He says Jang Song Thaek’s execution shows that Kim Jong Un’s regime has become relatively weaker than before and there are many forces supporting Jang’s power hidden inside North Korea.

Jang Song Thaek and his wife, Kim Kyong Hui, acted as mentors to Kim Jong Un when he became third generation ruler after his father Kim Jong Il's death in 2011.

KCNA claimed Jang plotted for years to take power from the Kim family and that his work began in earnest after Kim Jong Il's demise.

Jang was publicly ousted from power Sunday and stripped of all titles. He faced a laundry list of accusations including factionalism, ignoring orders, and selling off national resources on the cheap.

Political analysts say the 30-year-old North Korean leader saw Jang, more than twice his age, as a rival as he sought to secure sole control over the country.

Andrei Lankov is a professor of Korean history at Kookmin University. Interviewed by VOA via Skype, he says the publicity of the execution is likely intended to scare officials into obedience but it could also encourage rebellion.

“Under Kim Jong Il and Kim Il Sung they very seldom killed high level officials. Now they are not secure, they know it, and it means that if they face a threat, if somebody powerful enough is aware that he is going to be purged soon, he might seriously consider a coup or other kind of violent resistance to the regime,” Lankov said.

South Korea concerned

Jang's dramatic downfall raises alarm bells in Seoul as political change in North Korea is often accompanied by belligerent words or actions as a show of strength.

South Korea's office of the president on Friday held an urgent national security meeting to discuss the implications for stability on the Korean peninsula.

North Korea's military has been conducting winter drills this month.

South Korea's Defense Ministry spokesman Wi Yong-seob says they are closely monitoring the military for more aggressive movements.

He says it is possible that North Korea may conduct a fourth nuclear test or launch missiles but there is no special movement in the missile launch site or nuclear test site so far.

South Korea's Ministry of Unification is responsible for inter-Korean relations. Spokesman Kim Eui-do said the government was watching the events with concern.

He says the government is checking the internal situation in North Korea and considering various possibilities. He says they are watching North Korea's announcements and reactions and if there is any internal change from now on.

South Korea said it would work closely on the issue with allies and related governments.

The U.S. State Department said, if confirmed, the execution is another example of the extreme brutality of the North Korean regime.

VOA Seoul Bureau Producer Youmi Kim contributed to this report

You May Like

Israelis Quietly Expand Enclave in Palestinian District of Jerusalem

Estimated 500 settlers, armed or protected by paramilitary police, live in Silwan among 50,000 Palestinians More

Video US, Iran Face Similar Challenges in Syrian Fight Against IS

Both Washington, Tehran back fighters battling Islamic State militants in Iraq -- but in Syria they support opposing sides in country’s civil war More

China Boosts Efforts to Help Afghan, Regional Stability

Observers say China’s increased regional involvement are due to concerns that Afghan instability and the presence of anti-China militants in Pakistani border areas could fuel Xinjiang troubles More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Edvin from: Albania
January 06, 2014 1:56 PM
What has happened is a common phenomenon for communist countries. Unfortunately, communism and its extensions are not being treated in the democratic world in the same way fascism does. And that may cause a threat to democracy and freedom in our societies. We've heard a lot of bad things about the famous Senator McCarthy, but if through his tough ways he's been able to prevent the establishment of such regimes in the Western society, then maybe we must dare to consider also appreciating this contribution of him.


by: JerryFrey from: USA
December 13, 2013 11:23 AM
Behind the curtain: Fascinating pictures from inside North Korea give a rare glimpse inside the secretive Communist state
http://napoleonlive.info/see-the-evidence/facts-about-north-korea-2/


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
December 13, 2013 10:21 AM
There is nothing new here. The wording of the accusation is not true. But there was an element of truth in it - a rebellion. The element of truth in the accusation of the leader's uncle is that he became both weary and disillusioned about the North Korean system and advocated for change. The unfortunate man must have seen how Iran, just yesterday reintegrated into world affairs while North Korea remained an outlaw.

Perhaps he had been vehement in demanding a change, but a coup.., No! Like the blood of the early Christians became the seed of the Church, so also the blood of liberals and freedom fighters inside North Korea will form the seed of discord within the iron curtain, and its roots will tear down the walls of division. Soon, and very soon, Kim Jong Un will be laid bare with no supporters. North Korea will be about to be liberated from the non-progressive young madman's grip.

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
December 13, 2013 7:06 PM
I agree with you. North Korea could be the last county where an autocracy remains to be able to execute any protesters with no pleas.I am sure N. Korean regime should break down near future. But how could it be achieved? With interference of China? With more heavy sanctions from the world? Or by regicide from inside?


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
December 13, 2013 12:58 AM
I wonder how many people would follow Jang Song Thaek. What is the fate of Jan's wife, or aunt of Kim Jong Un? I am afraid the number of victims would expand as Kim developes delusion to suspect and kill his surroundings no matter how testimony exists. I agree and dare to expect it may happen an awared man would punish Kim before he was executed.


by: Anonymous
December 12, 2013 11:50 PM
Wow! I can't believe that they did that. IF he was a criminal, then send him to jail, don't take his life. Taking his life was a bigger crime.


by: Anonymous
December 12, 2013 11:28 PM
I have no doubt in me that an implosion will occur from within,which might even consume the erratic leader

In Response

by: Anonymoose from: nowhere
December 13, 2013 12:49 PM
Ahh yes...
Regicide is slowly creeping in.


by: Markt` from: Virginia
December 12, 2013 5:56 PM
I had a feeling about this one....when the story first broke a week or so ago I thought to myself, "he'll be dead soon." I was right.

In Response

by: Kaalmooye from: Nairobi
December 13, 2013 12:16 AM
You were not expecting to see O J Simpson soap opera style in Pyongyang, right?

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rulesi
X
October 21, 2014 12:20 AM
European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Ebola Orphanage Opens in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. Adam Bailes reports for VOA about a new interim care center that's aimed at helping the growing number of children affected by Ebola.
Video

Video Young Nairobi Tech Innovator on 'Track' in Security Business

A 24-year-old technology innovator in Nairobi has invented a tracking device that monitors and secures cars. He has also come up with what he claims is the most robust audio-visual surveillance system yet. As Lenny Ruvaga reports from the Kenyan capital, his innovations are offering alternative security solutions.
Video

Video Latinas Converting to Islam for Identity, Structure

Latinos are one of the fastest growing groups in the Muslim religion. According to the Pew Research Center, about 6 percent of American Muslims are Latino. And a little more than half of new converts are female. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti travelled to Miami, Florida -- where two out of every three residents is Hispanic -- to learn more.
Video

Video Exclusive: American Joins Kurds' Anti-IS Fight

The United States and other Western nations have expressed alarm about their citizens joining Islamic State forces in Syria and Iraq. In a rare counterpoint to the phenomenon, an American has taken up arms with the militants' Syrian Kurdish opponents. Elizabeth Arrott has more in this exclusive profile by VOA Kurdish reporter Zana Omer in Ras al Ayn, Syria.
Video

Video South Korea Confronts Violence Within Military Ranks

Every able-bodied South Korean male between 18 and 35 must serve for 21 to 36 months in the country’s armed forces, depending upon the specific branch. For many, service is a rite of passage to manhood. But there are growing concerns that bullying and violence come along with the tradition. Reporter Jason Strother has more from Seoul.
Video

Video North Carolina Emerges as Key Election Battleground

U.S. congressional midterm elections will be held on November 4th and most political analysts give Republicans an excellent chance to win a majority in the U.S. Senate, which Democrats now control. So what are the issues driving voters in this congressional election year? VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone traveled to North Carolina, one of the most politically competitive states in the country, to find out.
Video

Video Comanche People Maintain Pride in Their Heritage

The Comanche (Indian nation) once were called the “Lords of the Plains,” with an empire that included half the land area of current day Texas, large parts of Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas and Colorado.The fierceness and battle prowess of these warriors on horseback delayed the settlement of most of West Texas for four decades. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Lawton, Oklahoma, that while their warrior days are over, the 15,000 members of the Comanche Nation remain a proud people.
Video

Video Turkey Campus Attacks Raise Islamic Radicalization Fears

Concerns are growing in Turkey of Islamic radicalization at some universities, after clashes between supporters of the jihadist group Islamic State (IS) or ISIS, and those opposed to the extremists. Pro-jihadist literature is on sale openly on the streets of Istanbul. Critics accuse the government of turning a blind eye to radicalism at home, while Kurds accuse the president of supporting IS - a charge strongly denied. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

All About America

AppleAndroid