News / USA

    US Lawmaker Blasts Snowden's 'Mission Accomplished' Comment

    FILE - Congressman Peter King. FILE - Congressman Peter King.
    x
    FILE - Congressman Peter King.
    FILE - Congressman Peter King.
    Michael Bowman
    Fugitive U.S. intelligence leaker Edward Snowden’s comments that he “already won” his battle with the National Security Agency have provoked a strong reaction from a lawmaker who oversees America’s intelligence-gathering programs.

    The Washington Post quotes Edward Snowden as saying his “mission is already accomplished” as far as unveiling extensive U.S. snooping activities at home and abroad. Interviewed in Russia, where he has been granted temporary asylum, Snowden said he felt compelled to expose NSA data collection activities because, in his view, America’s elected officials had failed to supervise intelligence activities and kept invasive spying programs hidden from the public.

    A member of the House Intelligence Committee, Republican Congressman Peter King, says Snowden is anything but well-meaning and patriotic.

    “Edward Snowden has put American lives at risk," he said. "He has enabled the enemy to adapt to what the NSA is doing. Edward Snowden violated his oath, betrayed his country. All he deserves is contempt.”

    Snowden’s revelations have prompted a White House review of data-gathering practices, as well as outcries from U.S. allies, civil libertarians, and corporate technology giants. Snowden told The Washington Post his goal was not to bring down the NSA, but to improve it.

    Congressman King says “nothing good” has come of the Snowden episode.

    "So much damage has been done as far as our allies, as far as creating the illusion among the American people that their phone calls are being listened to, that their e-mails are being read - neither of which is true. The very nature of a spy agency is that we cannot have everything it does made public. And when I hear people say that somehow Snowden served a purpose, I could not disagree more. To me, he is a traitor, a defector, or both,” he said.

    The NSA will come under further scrutiny when lawmakers return to Washington next month. The Senate Judiciary Committee has scheduled a hearing to probe NSA practices and a set of proposed reforms.

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    by: tim from: usa
    December 26, 2013 8:58 AM
    snowden is an american hero ,, he has opened our eyes to how big the police state of king obamaland has become and continues to grow

    by: Serge from: Russia
    December 25, 2013 7:12 AM
    Let mr King name at least one American, whose life Snowden put at risk.

    by: Bert from: New York
    December 24, 2013 9:42 PM
    It's interesting to me how so many of the same people who are against the NSA spying are also using facebook and google. There's an argument to be made that those companies are much worse than the NSA. If you don't want to be a hypocrite, then quit google and facebook and switch to privacy-based sites, such as Ravetree, DuckDuckGo, HushMail, etc. You may not be able to get away from the NSA, but at least you can prevent google and facebook from exploiting the crap out of you.

    by: Patrick McAree from: Fairbanks Alaska
    December 24, 2013 9:19 PM
    I believe Mr. Snowden deserves the gratitude of the entire American public. He has made it abundantly clear to all that the American government has little interest in the right to privacy of the average American citizen or anybody else for that matter. I for one applaud Mr Snowden risking his life to inform the world of the devious nature of the American government.

    by: Paul from: California
    December 24, 2013 9:00 PM
    I find it fascinating to compare Mr. Snowden with the bureaucrats that are supposed to manage him. Snowden is articulate and seems only motivated by providing the truth. The bureaucrats can't seem to explain why they need to violate the privacy rights of everyone in the world...except that we should trust them because they no better.
    The US government has forgotten that in a democracy, the government is transparent, not the people who elect them. Snowden has is right when he says "if you want to know what the people are thinking, ask them. Its more accurate and cheaper than secretive spying.
    I hope we can find other places for the bureaucrats to work, which is more suited to their skills...like selling used cars.

    by: John Esq from: USA
    December 24, 2013 8:38 PM
    King's comments reflect a Government agency now put in the spot light and have exposed their layers of mis-informations and un-truths. Too bad every American citizen would not do more than shrug in ignorance and apathy to the levels of domestic spying which has occurred ! Snowden 2016 !!

    by: Rick from: Ross
    December 24, 2013 8:22 PM
    Anything that needed to be presented to a secret court is wrong.

    by: DrCruel from: East Coast
    December 24, 2013 8:15 PM
    Snowden is right. His objective was to damage the US government and has succeeded spectacularly. No matter what his accusation it will automatically be taken seriously. Whether or not what he says is true, it serves to ruin international relations somewhere for the US. It can go on for years, maybe decades.

    This is the fondest dream of every Leftist in the West. I can see why he's so smug.

    by: WHO KNOWS from: SOMEWHERE
    December 24, 2013 7:47 PM
    Peter King and James Clapper, and the Rest of the NSA Stooges who proclaim to protect us while they build a network of tools that spy on US, look at our ban accounts, check our emails, listen to our phones, and survey any and all electronic commerce or conversations, under the guise of security, Edward Snowden EXPOSED IT, Brought SUNLIGHT to the DAR corners where NSA Goons in Data Centers collect and catalog YOU....Snowden should be pardoned, absolutely, The NSA is no Better then the Stassi who put listening devices everywhere, cameras everywhere and tapped and listened to the Citizens of East German in any attempt to circumvent distrust of THEM....PARDON SNOWDEN, JAIL KING, CLAPPER AND THE REST OF THEM, Its not the kind of Security I want....PRISM, and all the rest of these programs are used to spy on anyone, everyone, Not Terror Suspects, EVERYONE...Your guilty until they check your Metadata.....

    by: alfredo ibarra from: leon mexico
    December 24, 2013 2:28 PM
    i agree with snowden as far as what business has the government on listening private conversations, which is tantamount to opening your mail and Reading it which is atrocious and a judge confirmed that is a violation of one's rights, i don't think that snowden is a hero but nor as nefarious as some lawmakers want to portray him
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