News / USA

Damage from NSA Leak Being Assessed

A photo made June 6, 2013 in Washington shows a copy of the  U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court order requiring Verizon on an "ongoing, daily basis" to give the National Security Administration (NSA) information on all landline and mobile teleph
A photo made June 6, 2013 in Washington shows a copy of the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court order requiring Verizon on an "ongoing, daily basis" to give the National Security Administration (NSA) information on all landline and mobile teleph
VOA News
The U.S. government is investigating whether the disclosure of a highly classified U.S. surveillance program by Edward Snowden was criminal.

Snowden said Sunday he is the source for news reports of the U.S. National Security Agency's monitoring of phone calls and Internet data for threats of terrorism, a program the Obama administration says keeps America safe from terrorists.

Meanwhile, European officials are examining the spy programs and whether they violated local privacy protections. European governments have been trying to explain whether they let Washington spy on their citizens or benefited from snooping that would be illegal at home

EU officials in Brussels pledged to seek answers from U.S. diplomats at a ministerial meeting later this week in Dublin.
 
In Washington, lawmakers said they are looking at potential ways to keep the United States safe from terror attacks without giving up privacy protections.

Snowden's whereabouts are unknown since he checked out of a Hong Kong hotel on Monday. He said he will seek asylum in any country that believes in free speech and global privacy.

The information Snowden revealed included a secret court order directing Verizon Communications to turn over all its telephone records for a three-month period, and details about an NSA program code-named PRISM, that collected emails, chat logs and other types of data from Internet companies. These included Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, AOL and Apple.

U.S. officials say the program is not designed to listen to telephone calls and the data they gathered has stopped several terrorist plots.

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by: Brandt from: Nashville
June 11, 2013 9:58 PM
We’re finally seeing the true dangers of letting our civil liberties get compromised over the past decade. Under the guise of fighting terrorism, the Patriot Act was adopted WITHOUT public approval or vote just weeks after the events of 9/11. The laws are simply a means to spy on our own citizens and to detain and torture dissidents without trial or a right to council. Are we really living in this Orwellian society of Fear? Some say we're at war with ourselves at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2011/09/living-in-society-of-fear-ten-years.html


by: Anonymous
June 11, 2013 5:57 PM
Just imagine if 911 didn't happen, none of this would be happening.
As well the West wouldn't of spent BILLIONS on overtightening security. The only defeat the terrorists can do to the west is financially, and so far they are obviously winning because of the suffering of the Western economy. You can't fight wars with no money.


by: Al Milne
June 11, 2013 5:07 AM
I was not surprised to see Clapper talk about the SERIOUS damage to security. Clapper is a Booz Allen Hamilton guy. More like SERIOUS damage to the reputation and potential on-going contracts with the US Government.

In Response

by: Anonymous
June 11, 2013 2:18 PM
Tell Snowden for safy reason that he shall fly to North Koren.

In Response

by: Ray from: USA
June 11, 2013 11:20 AM
Hi Al...

I read your comment and was relieved that you did not express any desire for privacy .. or your Rights ... both of which are now considered suspicious activity.

I would love to know what corporation Feinstein is tied in to. She just announced that she will do a complete review of the intelligence system .. that she runs. I understand she looked in the mirror for five minutes and said "Yup.. it is fine."

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