News / USA

Number of Chinese Students in US Dramatically Expands

Elizabeth Lee
The number of students from China studying at universities across the United States has increased dramatically. According to some statistics, the number of undergraduate students from China in the U.S. has doubled in the last two years.  Economists say the trend is due, in large part, to a growing middle class in China. Los Angeles county has one of the largest Chinese student populations in the U.S. - totaling more than 4000 students.

At the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, it is not difficult to spot students from China. They gather regularly for social events, such as this Mid-Autumn festival.

Environmental engineering student Sun Wei said he has not met many Americans because there are so many students from his home country. But he said there is a positive side to this.

“The benefit is when I arrived it doesn't take much adjusting," Wei said. "It's all Chinese.”

Opportunity and challenge

But coming to the United States is not easy for many Chinese students.

An Rupeng, a doctoral student at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, said that being away from family has been difficult him and his wife.

“We are the only child in both families. And when your parents get older, they tend to miss you a lot and miss their grandson a lot,” said An.

But An said he has enjoyed experiencing a different culture.

Ferdinando Guerra, an economist with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, said Chinese students have helped the local economy by contributing more than $100 million last year.  And he said they contributed more than $4.5 billion to the U.S. economy.

“The number of Chinese students studying in the United States has almost tripled in the past decade, and has almost quadrupled since 1995,” said Guerra.

Chinese wealth grows

The main reason for the dramatic increase is the growth of the Chinese economy, said RAND Corporation economist Jim Hosek.

“There are a lot of Chinese entrepreneurs, businessmen of all sorts business leaders, who are simply wealthier today, and they can afford to send their sons and daughters abroad,” said Hosek.

Chinese native Li Jing  agreed. She received her doctorate in education at the University of Southern California. Li said the way in which  Chinese students pay for their tuition abroad has changed since she studied this topic in 2004.

“The majority of Chinese students received scholarships," Li said. "Now, the majority of Chinese students pay their own way to come here to study.”

Influx of Chinese students

In addition, the number of undergraduate students from China in the United States has doubled during the past two years, said University of Southern California's Dean of Religious Life, Varun Soni. He said that although Chinese students typically study engineering and the hard sciences, a new generation is starting to major in subjects such as business, education, and film.
 
“I think one of the trends we see with this generation is they're really thinking about what they can learn here that will help them when they go back to China. It's not like they want to move here permanently, like previous generations of students wanted to,” said Soni.

It is a trend that worries some Americans, said economist Jim Hosek.

“The number one concern on people's minds has been the outflow of human capital,” he said.

Exchange of culture, ideas, skills

University of Southern California political scientist Stanley Rosen said Chinese are using what they learned here in the United States to set up businesses in China.

“So it's really a more personal usage of what they get here and then use that technology, which may not exist or is at a lower level in China, to establish their own business and be supported by the government in doing so. But that's a problem in other countries as well,” said Rosen.

But experts, like Soni, say much can be gained from having Chinese students in the United States.  

“It's easy to demonize the other when you don't know the other. But as Chinese students become more integrated in American society and make American friends, and as American students increasingly go to China to study and to learn, I think we become more integrated as cultures, as nations, which makes the opportunity for collaboration, cooperation, much more apparent and achievable,” said Soni.

In addition to more integration of the East and the West, economists say Chinese graduates of American universities who return to their homeland also could help foster more Chinese investment in the United States.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Ernie from: Beijing
October 15, 2012 9:51 PM
The Chinese are bolstering U.S. uni coffers with exorbitant foreign student tuitions, but it's bad because now they're going back to China with their degrees. Boy, you guys ain't kidding when you call yourselves the voice of America. You forgot to mention that the Chinese hate Murkens for their freedom.

by: johnson naidoo from: south africa
October 15, 2012 1:38 AM
Dr Varun Soni's comments is interesting.
Generally the Chinese thirst for knowledge is incredible.
In every far flung corner of the Globe the Chinese are an
enterprising Community and the knowledge that they learn from Institutions like the University of Southern California and from America in general are put to good use.
The new generation want to make China THE COUNTRY and
therefore would learn from other Countries like the USA and plough it back to their own Country.

by: Mike Smith from: Adelaide, South Australia
October 13, 2012 9:14 AM
To quote from the Australian Federal Government - "data shows this year 22,565 international students have enrolled in South Australian educational institutions in the first six months of this year, which is down from 25,011 at the same time last year and the lowest June figure since 2008."

Swings and roundabouts. Changing fashions in study destinations will impact student numbers and have a significant impact on real estate prices in popular locales.

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