News / USA

NY Times: US Deportation of Illegal Immigrants Declines

FILE - A man marches with a sign during a protest in front of a building that houses federal immigration offices.
FILE - A man marches with a sign during a protest in front of a building that houses federal immigration offices.
VOA News
The New York Times reports the number of court ordered deportations of illegal immigrants in the United States has fallen nearly in half since 2009.

Figures released Wednesday by the Justice Department, which oversees the federal government's immigration court system, show the Obama administration opened 26 percent fewer deportation cases in the courts last year than in 2009.
 
Immigration Judge Decisions by Disposition – Initial Case Completions: FY2009 – ‘13.Immigration Judge Decisions by Disposition – Initial Case Completions: FY2009 – ‘13.
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Immigration Judge Decisions by Disposition – Initial Case Completions: FY2009 – ‘13.
Immigration Judge Decisions by Disposition – Initial Case Completions: FY2009 – ‘13.
The numbers highlight the administration's shift towards greater discretion among prosecutors about the people they sought to deport. The Times said prosecutors have increasingly offered to suspend cases of immigrants with no criminal records who had families in the United States. The number of suspended cases rose more than 400 percent between 2011 and 2013.

President Barack Obama has come under increasing pressure from immigration advocates who have accused him of moving too slowly on reforming the nation's immigration system, while the number of deportations under his watch reaches 2 million.

A comprehensive immigration reform bill that would improve border security and offer a path to citizenship for the nearly 12 million undocumented immigrants was approved by the Democratic-led U.S. Senate last year, but the Republican-controlled House of Representatives has refused to take up the issue.

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by: Chuck Curtis from: Dallas TX
April 18, 2014 3:51 PM
Here are two news reports on undocumented criminal deportations that cite conflicting statistics about this public safety problem. On April 6, 2014 The New York Times reported in “More Deportations Follow Minor Crimes,” that 20% “of the (two million deportation) cases involved people convicted of serious crimes.”

In the meantime, on April 15, 2014, Texas TV station KETC reported ICE claimed 82% “of individuals removed from the interior of the United States had previously been convicted of a criminal offense.” (“40 illegal alien criminals arrested by ICE“)

Is ICE hounding innocent (except for illegal entry and minor crimes) hard-working families or saving us from hard-core criminals? It sounds suspiciously like the old saying, “numbers don’t like but liars use numbers.”


by: Not Again from: Canada
April 18, 2014 11:29 AM
Both Canada and the US are nations whose past, present and future was, is, will be ever dependant on immigrants. Both nations came to prosperity, in great part, due to the labour, the entreneurship and drive of immigrants. Given the observed demographics = population ageing, growth and sustainabiltity, immigration is part and parcel of the fundamentals of US and Canadian economic viability.

Essentially, and the bottom line, no person, that is positively contributing to the state should be deported; on the other hand, those that are involved in criminal activities, especially violence, should be summarly deported after they serve their sentences; and so it should be for all those that do not or negatively contribute to society, including those that take advantage of generous benefits for many years, refusing to be gainfully employed; these two negative main groups are the ones that create the backlash and the push for the expulsion of all immigrants (legal/illegal); unfortuately many of them, appear to use the legal system to remain in countries for, in some cases, decades.

The most illogical of deportations relate to those that have established bussineses and in fact contribute more to the economy and well being than most others do. The deportation of young/younger people that have been educated, at great expense of the taxpayers, is even a worse folly. The administration's push for a legislative solution, is correct, but it may take years; a more directive approach would be through a regulatory approach, with the extension of a permit system, that may cover periods of up to ten years at a time, which would be valid and effective for as long as they contribute to the tax pool, or and employment of others, or and continue progressing positively through higher education levels.

In any case, in my view, blindly deporting people that are making a positive contribution to society, is not in the best interests of anyone.

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