News / Africa

Obama Ends Africa Trip, Voices Confidence in Future

U.S. President Barack Obama and the First lady Michelle Obama wave from Air Force One upon their departure from Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama and the First lady Michelle Obama wave from Air Force One upon their departure from Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama ended his Africa trip Tuesday, voicing confidence in Africa's future with help from a new U.S. model for development assistance.

U.S. President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush (R) attend a memorial for the victims of the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombing in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.U.S. President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush (R) attend a memorial for the victims of the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombing in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
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U.S. President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush (R) attend a memorial for the victims of the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombing in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush (R) attend a memorial for the victims of the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombing in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
In Tanzania, Obama and former U.S. president George W. Bush marked the 1998  al-Qaida terrorist bombing. Coordinated truck bomb attacks on the U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam, and Nairobi, Kenya on August 7, 1998 left 224 people dead.  

Just over three years later, al-Qaida attacked the United States directly on home soil on September 11, 2001.

In a brief ceremony at the new embassy building that opened in 2003, Obama and former president Bush laid a wreath at the memorial to those killed in the attacks.

With five family members of victims and those who survived the attack nearby, they walked side by side to the memorial, and bowed their heads for a moment of silence.

Obama's Africa trip has been focused primarily on enhancing trade and investment in the continent, based on a new model of aid, public-private partnerships with African governments and reforms.

But security threats faced by African nations, and the U.S. role in helping to counter extremist groups, were on the agenda in his discussions from Senegal to South Africa and Tanzania.

U.S. President Barack Obama speaking at the University of Cape Town, June 30, 2013.U.S. President Barack Obama speaking at the University of Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
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U.S. President Barack Obama speaking at the University of Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama speaking at the University of Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
In South Africa, Obama spoke of what he called the  “senseless terrorism that all too often perverts the meaning of Islam - one of the world’s great religions - and takes the lives of countless innocent Africans.”

He also attempted to counter the notion that the United States is militarizing its involvement in Africa, saying ultimately Africans must shoulder their own security responsibilities.

“I know there's a lot of talk of America’s military presence in Africa.  But if you look at what we’re actually doing, time and again, we're putting muscle behind African efforts,” he said.

In the final event of his Africa trip, Obama visited a formerly idle power plant brought back to life through joint Tanzanian-U.S. efforts, highlighting his new initiative to double access to electricity in Africa.

Obama said this reflects his approach of combining public and private resources to spur economic progress.

He referred to other new initiatives, from agriculture to education and health, and said the United States intends to be a strong partner with Africa in years ahead.

“That is what all our efforts are going to be about, is making sure that Africans have the tools to create a better life for their people and that the United States is a partner in that process.  It's going to good for Africa, it's going to be good for the United States and it's going to be good for the world,” he said.

U.S. President Barack Obama participates in a joint news conference with Senegal's President Macky Sall in Dakar, June 27, 2013.U.S. President Barack Obama participates in a joint news conference with Senegal's President Macky Sall in Dakar, June 27, 2013.
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U.S. President Barack Obama participates in a joint news conference with Senegal's President Macky Sall in Dakar, June 27, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama participates in a joint news conference with Senegal's President Macky Sall in Dakar, June 27, 2013.
Over a week of travel, Obama highlighted democratic progress and the importance of civil society and human rights in Senegal.

He held up South Africa's democratic transition and progress against HIV/AIDS as a model for Africa, met family members of critically ill former president Nelson Mandela, and underscored the role of Africa's youth in building the future.

As he left Tanzania he said he was inspired, and convinced that "with the right approach Africa and its people can unleash a new era of prosperity.”


  • U.S. President Barack Obama heads a soccer ball at Ubungo Power Plant in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013. The ball called a "soccket ball" has internal electronics that allows it to generate and store electricity that can power small devices.
  • U.S. First lady Michelle Obama walks with Salma Kikwete, wife of Tanzania's president, during a departure ceremony in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama and former president George W. Bush (left) attend a memorial for the victims of the 1998 U.S. embassy bombing in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, and Tanzanian first lady Salma Kikwete wave as they arrive at State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, July 1, 2013.
  • President Barack Obama and Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete walk in front of Michelle Obama and Salma Kikwete as they arrive at the State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, July 1, 2013.
  • Young girls and women wear the khanga, a traditional wrap, with the image of U.S. President Barack Obama as they line up to greet him at the State House, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, July 1, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama writes in a guest book as he tours Robben Island with first lady Michelle Obama, near Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama departs the Robben Island prison cell where Nelson Mandela spent 18 of his 27 years of imprisonment near Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama listens to Desmond Tutu as he visits his HIV Foundation Youth Center and takes part in a health event in Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama greets participants at a town hall-style meeting with young African leaders at the University of Johannesburg in Soweto, June 29, 2013.
  • Members of the White House traveling staff walk to a group of helicopters about to transport U.S. President Barack Obama from a soccer field in Johannesburg, June 29, 2013.
  • Protesters argue with police outside the University of Johannesburg in Soweto, ahead of a visit by U.S. President Barack Obama, June 29, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama look out of a doorway that slaves departed from on Goree Island, Senegal, June 27, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama visits a food security expo in Dakar, Senegal, June 28, 2013.
  • People line the motorcade route of U.S. President Barack Obama on his way to meet with Senegalese President Macky Sall in Dakar, June 27, 2013.

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Comments
     
by: mambo from: bweya,TZ
July 05, 2013 4:56 AM
Obama is not welcome here in Africa,good wine needs no bush,Chinese president was warmly welcome with no single protest.China is doing good here in Africa.

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
July 05, 2013 2:26 AM
Implementation is needed more than speech in Africa. Unfortunatelly Obama looks favor adress gessing from the recent one implemented in front of Brandenburger Tor.

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
July 04, 2013 9:03 PM
Obama says to us "...with the right approach Africa and it's people can unleash a new era of prosperity". We, Africans, should say to Obama "YES WE CAN".

by: Mubarak from: Somaliland
July 03, 2013 4:07 AM
As an African, I would say Obma needs to go a step higher and talk of implementation rather than keeping telling us promises he will hardly do.

by: Godwin
July 02, 2013 2:58 PM
Please tell us how Africa is doing with regard to human rights and democracy. Nigeria, CAR, Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Zimbabwe are countries you could expand upon. mmmm.

President Obama is a world Leader whose reputation is not tainted.

by: Alem
July 02, 2013 8:24 AM
Thank you Daniel for reminding us the President "voices confidence in Africa's future." But you failed to report is that the president had made similar statements when he last visited the continent in 2009. And kept precious little of his promises. It is interesting that his predecessor George Bush's Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is generous, effective and something Africans would be grateful for generations to come.
In Response

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 02, 2013 12:02 PM
Obama is truly an African, no different from other presidents in Africa. They make promises they don't intend to keep. Their difference is that African presidents in Africa have others write their speech for them and they only read it out to the people when they have to deliver a speech. Obama writes his own (or has someone write it for him) but memorizes and produces it like his own. Their meeting point is in the intention of non-implementation. He is a little wiser too. He knows that Africans have too shallow memories and forget easily, that's why he returns in so short a time to repeat the same promise when he knows he has done nothing about it. The brighter side to it is that it's just good that Obama makes the promises which remind China of the needs of Africa. And Xi is making good those promises, so not to worry Obama for their implementation.

by: Ed from: WV
July 02, 2013 8:21 AM
Confidence? Africa is riddled with disease, poverty and political violence.

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