News / Africa

Obama, Tanzanian President Discuss Development, Regional Conflicts

President Barack Obama, followed by first lady Michelle Obama, does a dance upon his arrival ceremony with Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, right, July 1, 2013, at Julius Nyerere International Airport in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
President Barack Obama, followed by first lady Michelle Obama, does a dance upon his arrival ceremony with Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, right, July 1, 2013, at Julius Nyerere International Airport in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
In Tanzania, President Barack Obama and President Jakaya Kikwete have discussed plans to step up economic engagement with the continent and a “new model” for U.S. assistance.

The Obamas received a warm airport welcome from the president and his wife, complete with a marching band, and women dressed in traditional “khanga” skirts bearing Obama's picture.

In a news conference after bilateral talks, both leaders took questions about the development, trade and investment agenda of Obama's trip.  Obama reiterated a key objective of his new model for engagement.

“I have said this throughout Africa.  We are looking at a new model that is based not just on aid and assistance, but on trade and partnership," he said.

President Kikwete thanked President Obama for “invaluable” support in Tanzania's development efforts, from education to food security and HIV/AIDS prevention.

“The lives of the people of Tanzania are different today thanks in many ways to the support we have been getting from the United States of America," said President Kikwete.

Obama noted Kikwete was the first African leader welcomed to the White House after Obama took office.  

Obama also noted that his visit to Tanzania came just ahead of the 50th anniversary of the late President John F. Kennedy welcoming President Julius Nyerere to the White House on July 15, 1963.

Obama called Tanzania a close partner with the United States on major development initiatives, and lauded Tanzanians for democratic progress.

“Tanzanians continue to work to strengthen their democracy.  Parliament, opposition groups, civil society groups and journalists are all doing their part to advance the good governance and transparency on which democracy and transparency depend," he said.

The two leaders also discussed African conflicts, including the one in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Obama said all parties need to implement commitments under a recently-signed U.N. Framework for Peace.

Obama said the peace framework has to be more than just a piece of paper and countries surrounding Congo need to step up.

“The countries surrounding the Congo they have got to make commitments to stop funding armed groups that are encroaching on the territorial integrity and sovereignty of the Congo," he said. "They have signed on to a piece of paper, now the question is, do they follow through?”

As Obama arrived, the White House announced he had signed an executive order to provide $10 million to sub-Saharan countries to help them combat trafficking in wildlife.

Tanzania and other countries are highly dependent on wildlife tourism.  U.S. officials noted that rhinos and elephants are particularly threatened by poachers, who are motivated by high prices for horns and tusks in an illegal trade worth at least $7 billion per year.

On Tuesday, Obama and former U.S. president George W. Bush, who is also visiting Tanzania, participate in a wreath-laying event at the site of the al-Qaida U.S. embassy bombing in 1998.

Obama used a response to a question on the appearance by reiterating praise for the anti-AIDS program PEPFAR that Bush initiated.

“I am looking forward to being able, on African soil, to once again thank him on behalf of the American people, for showing how American generosity and foresight could end up making a real difference in people's lives," said Obama.

Meanwhile, first lady Michelle Obama and her predecessor Laura Bush will participate in a First Ladies Summit in Dar es Salaam about empowering women in Africa.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama heads a soccer ball at Ubungo Power Plant in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013. The ball called a "soccket ball" has internal electronics that allows it to generate and store electricity that can power small devices.
  • U.S. First lady Michelle Obama walks with Salma Kikwete, wife of Tanzania's president, during a departure ceremony in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama and former president George W. Bush (left) attend a memorial for the victims of the 1998 U.S. embassy bombing in Dar es Salaam, July 2, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete, and Tanzanian first lady Salma Kikwete wave as they arrive at State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, July 1, 2013.
  • President Barack Obama and Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete walk in front of Michelle Obama and Salma Kikwete as they arrive at the State House in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, July 1, 2013.
  • Young girls and women wear the khanga, a traditional wrap, with the image of U.S. President Barack Obama as they line up to greet him at the State House, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, July 1, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama writes in a guest book as he tours Robben Island with first lady Michelle Obama, near Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama departs the Robben Island prison cell where Nelson Mandela spent 18 of his 27 years of imprisonment near Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama listens to Desmond Tutu as he visits his HIV Foundation Youth Center and takes part in a health event in Cape Town, June 30, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama greets participants at a town hall-style meeting with young African leaders at the University of Johannesburg in Soweto, June 29, 2013.
  • Members of the White House traveling staff walk to a group of helicopters about to transport U.S. President Barack Obama from a soccer field in Johannesburg, June 29, 2013.
  • Protesters argue with police outside the University of Johannesburg in Soweto, ahead of a visit by U.S. President Barack Obama, June 29, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama look out of a doorway that slaves departed from on Goree Island, Senegal, June 27, 2013.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama visits a food security expo in Dakar, Senegal, June 28, 2013.
  • People line the motorcade route of U.S. President Barack Obama on his way to meet with Senegalese President Macky Sall in Dakar, June 27, 2013.

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by: Matondo from: Mbanza, Kongo central
July 04, 2013 12:19 PM
For Congolese, the US President either gives the impression of not having a clear idea about the Congo tragedy or does not simply want to bruise Clinton's pals in Kampala and Kigali. And the Congo's neighbours he refers to can mean those in the south or in the north of the country, not necessarily Rwanda and Uganda as we all know. So why ask Kabila to strengthen his army without mentioning those armed groups (most of which from Kampala and Kigali) who commit massacre in the eastern Congo and their supporters?

by: Ettore Greco
July 01, 2013 9:36 PM
The Beast is not done yet.
Watch the return of George W. Bush

9/11 (false flag attack planned by Bush & co.)
7/7 false flag in London (Blair seals the Pact with Bush)
The War in Iraq
The next expansion of the territory of Israel.
The future collapse of the World financial system

All these are not individual events but instead part of the Zionist Plan.

First of its kind, this worldwide crisis was provoked through a terror event (9/11) plotted by a US president, George Bush, in cahoots with the Israeli Mossad.

This event was plotted to destabilize the equilibrium of all Countries and trigger a chain of events almost unavoidable all of them part of the same Plan.

The old economy will get to the last stop.
The internet instead will have its plug pulled

Massive poverty will bring chaos and anarchy while the lack of effective governments will set the stage for one World Tyranny (and the return of George Bush)
It will be just from chaos that one voice will rise with the promise to fix all and everyone.



by: robert lipton from: lakewood,co
July 01, 2013 1:32 PM
5 billion for African development.. we don't have 5 billion without printing it..well we have to offset Chinese influence inAfrica ... ok , we'll borrow 5 billion more frrom the Chinese... around and around......

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