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Obama, Romney Spar in Second Debate

Obama Engages Romney in Spirited Second Debatei
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Jim Malone
October 17, 2012 6:46 AM
U.S. President Barack Obama and his Republican challenger, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, clashed on a wide range of issues Tuesday in their second of three presidential debates. As VOA national correspondent Jim Malone reports, this debate was far more contentious than their first encounter two weeks ago.

Obama Engages Romney in Spirited Second Debate

Kent Klein
President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney faced off Tuesday in the second of three nationally televised debates. This forum contained far more confrontation than the first, with the candidates occasionally lapsing into arguments.
 
With his poll numbers fading after a listless performance in the first debate, President Obama was far more energetic and aggressive in the second debate.
 
He and Governor Romney tangled in a town hall-style forum at Hofstra University, near New York City, where the two candidates fielded questions from an audience of undecided voters.
 
On several occasions they began to argue, as in this exchange on energy policy.
 
Obama: “There were a whole bunch of oil companies...”
Romney: “No, I had a, I had a question, and the question was, how much did you cut them by?”
Obama: “You want me to answer the question?  I am happy to answer the question.”  
Romney: “All right.  And it is?”
Obama: “Here is what happened....”

One audience question concerned the September attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, which killed the ambassador and three other Americans. 

  • Mariella Roque, 21, of Miami, left, and Jorge Palamino, 24, of Miami, right, supporters of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, cheer as they watch a televised debate between Romney and President Barack Obama in Coral Gables, Florida.
  • Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama spar over energy policy during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, October 16, 2012.
  • Frank Nieves, of the Puerto Rican/Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, a supporter of President Barack Obama applauds as he watches a televised debate between Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, and Mr. Obama, Miramar, Florida.
  • President Barack Obama speaks as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney listens during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012.
  • Members of the audience look on as U.S. President Barack Obama (R) speaks as he debates Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during the second U.S. presidential debate in Hempstead, New York October 16, 2012.
  • Residents of the Quail Ridge Manor independent living apartment complex watch the presidential debate, October 16, 2012, in Boulder City, Nevada.
  • President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greet each other as they arrive for the presidential debate, October 16, 2012.
  • President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney participate in the second presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012.
  • Students show their support for President Barack Obama as they gather around a television network set on the campus of Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, site of the presidential debate, October. 16, 2012.
  • Hofstra University junior Corinne Mestemacher poses with cardboard cut outs of President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney ahead of the presidential debate, Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012.
The president took ultimate responsibility for the security lapses that allowed the attack to happen, but he also criticized Romney for his response to the incident.
 
“While we were still dealing with our diplomats being threatened, Governor Romney put out a press release, trying to make political points.  And, that is not how a commander-in-chief operates.  You do not turn national security into a political issue," he said. 
 
Governor Romney said the administration's failures in Benghazi were symbolic of an overall failed Middle East policy.  And, he said it was Obama who played politics in the aftermath of the attack.
 
“The president, the day after that happened, flies to Las Vegas for a political fundraiser, and the next day to Colorado for another political event. I think these actions taken by a president and leader have symbolic significance," he said.
 
On the economy, the president defended his record on the economy and promised to continue working to speed the recovery.
 
“We have created five million jobs, gone from 800,000 jobs a month being lost, and we are making progress.  We saved an auto industry that was on the brink of collapse," he said. 
 
Governor Romney said Obama's economic record has been poor and would not improve in a second term.
 
“I think you know better.  I think you know that these last four years have not been so good, as the president just described, and that you do not feel like you are confident that the next four years are going to be much better either.  I can tell you that if you elect President Obama, you know what you are going to get.  You are going to get a repeat of the last four years," he said. 
 
Romney said the president was not doing enough to confront China on allegations of cheating on trade issues.  He said he would label China a currency manipulator from his first day in office.  The president defended his record on China, saying he has won numerous cases against Beijing at the World Trade Organization.
 
The two candidates also squared off on immigration, women's issues, gun control and education.
 
Several polls taken in the moments after the debate gave the president a slight advantage.
 
A wide majority of Americans believed Romney won the first debate, on October Third, and the Republican challenger has been gaining in public opinion polls since then.  Most recent polls show the two candidates almost even.
 
Both candidates will campaign in swing states Wednesday. Romney goes to Virginia and the president will visit Iowa and Ohio.
 
Obama and Governor Romney will meet in one final debate, on foreign policy issues, next Monday in Florida.

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Comments
     
by: Brandt Hardin
October 17, 2012 2:26 PM
If lying is a sin then Mitt Romney’s Magic Mormon Underpants are on FIRE! How can any intelligent American vote for a man clouded in secrecy who habitually bends the truth? Income inequality is endangering the Middle Class and making paupers of us all who don’t have those millions upon millions of dollars. Read more about the role of Romney’s riches in this election and the power of his sacred undergarments at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2012/05/mitt-romneys-magic-mormon-underwear.html The working class of our country can’t AFFORD to allow this election to be bought and sold!


by: Observer from: Southeastasia
October 17, 2012 1:04 PM
Obama is a greenhorn megalomania in foreign policy even after 4 years as the president. Any vote for him means a vote for America's global drastic decline. America's enemies want him to be re-elected for the doom of America. Has he closed down the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp as he promised to do within the first day of his election as the US president. This guy in words can declare rhetorically persuasively that he can change stone into bread, and water into wine. But when it comes to reality, all his words prove empty.


by: RICH from: MIDDLETOWN
October 17, 2012 7:32 AM
how come the republican's are not talking about how they gut the security at embassy's out of OBAMA BUDGET BY 128 MILLION COME ON TEA PARTY TELL THE WORLD JASON CHAFFETZ GOP HOPE TO BE--SAID YOU HAVE TO PRIORITIZE THINGS--YOU CUT BRAG ABOUT THAT


by: heshukui from: china
October 17, 2012 7:25 AM
Obama!
I envy the people of the United States!

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