China Becomes Campaign Issue for Obama, Romney

This combination of file pictures shows Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) and US President Barack Obama (R)
This combination of file pictures shows Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) and US President Barack Obama (R)
Mitt Romney launched a fresh criticism of China on Wednesday, using the opening statement of the U.S. presidential campaign's first debate to promise he would "crack down on China if and when they cheat."

The language is not unusual for the Republican party presidential candidate, who has promised, if elected, to designate China as a currency manipulator on his first day in office.

The man he is trying to unseat, President Barack Obama, has also vowed to get tough on China. Last month, he filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization, arguing that Beijing was unfairly subsidizing auto exports. It was the ninth such action taken during the Obama administration.

Campaign ads




Both campaigns have also released a flurry of China-themed campaign advertisements to attack the other's record. The ads have led some observers to say that each side is seemingly in competition over who can use the toughest language against the emerging power, which is often blamed for U.S. job losses.

That does not sit well with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. The former top diplomat, who oversaw Washington's re-engagement with Beijing 40 years ago, says both candidates are using "extremely deplorable" language in describing China as a "cheat."

Speaking at a forum at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington on Wednesday, Kissinger said he was "bothered" that both campaigns are "appealing to suspicion of China" in order to win votes.

Kissinger has already endorsed Mitt Romney, but he says he does not support the candidate's promise to label China a currency manipulator, adding that he believes most China experts agree with him.

A recent poll suggests Romney's strategy may be helping his candidacy. The poll, conducted by the Wall Street Journal and NBC News, found that 45 percent of registered voters think Romney would do a better job of handling the economic challenges posed by China. By comparison, only 37 percent said Obama would handle the situation better.

For their part, Chinese officials have been careful not to take sides in the U.S. presidential campaign, instead insisting that both candidates are using the China issue to win votes. Several Chinese state media editorials have recently suggested that once elected, the winning candidate will realize the need to cooperate with China, the world's second largest economy.
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by: Church State from: USA
October 23, 2012 1:33 PM
Did evasive, unaccountable, sworn to secrecy, and buzzword Republican presidential hopeful Willard Mitt Romney say he plans to get tough with China? I truly do not think he would do such a thing, especially since the religion to which he is a devote member (the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints - the Mormons) has for years pleaded with the Chinese government to allow Mormon missionaires to proselytize in their mainland country. The LDS church has settled for having only a "presence". Now as for controlling government spending. I certainly hope Mitt Romney makes it a priority to greatly reduce or better yet eliminate all of U.S. federal tax dollars spent to support the funding of the LDS Missionaries (60,000+ worldwide), and now in October 2012 the number of enrollees increasing from 700 to 4,000 per week since LDS church leaders lowered the eligibility of missionary minimum age of men to 18yrs and women to 19yrs old. There seems to be no maximum age limit (55+) so wealthy retired persons are eligible. Worst yet upon their return of serving their LDS missions, U.S. federal tax dollars will then be used to pay for the college education because they supposedly served as community "volunteers". The loophole being exploited is the proselytizing cannot be in "scripted" form (maybe consistent use of keywords is acceptable). The U.S. federal tax payers can hold Utah Senator Orin Hatch (senator of host state of Romney's 2002 Winter Olympics and state headquarters of the LDS/Mormon Church) and other LDS faithful lawmakers, responsible for sponsoring early amendments to and finally the 2009 Kennedy-Hatch bill Serve America Act (to triple the number of AmeriCorp volunteers to 250,000 and boost the educational stipend they recievie for tuition assistance). The irony of the entire situation is the LDS faithful pay minimum if no U.S. federal tax dollars (example Mitt Romeys multi-million dollar contributions to his church on his 2010 tax forms) to payout to the Hatch Serve America Act since their 15% tithings are considered eligibile federal tax deductions to a private non-profit. The LDS church collects a tithing for the Missionary fund why is that money not being used to support its growing worldwide missionary program?

by: Wangchuk from: NYC
October 06, 2012 1:00 AM
Whoever wins the Presidency, it's time the US got tougher on Communist China & stopped kowtowing. Other Asian nations depend on the US to stand up to China. The CCP wants China to be the Middle Kingdom again. America must not allow China to rule the world.

by: chan hui liu from: tian jin
October 05, 2012 3:20 AM
If rommney wins the presidency,The relations between china and USA will be a stepback, it is a disaster for both nations peoples who love peace.they both have a lot to do and talk ,why they both take "china" as a topic,just like idiots ,what is the future of usa,l cant see.it is just like political game,just for its political purpose by sacrifice american benifits

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