China Becomes Campaign Issue for Obama, Romney

    This combination of file pictures shows Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) and US President Barack Obama (R)
    This combination of file pictures shows Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) and US President Barack Obama (R)
    Mitt Romney launched a fresh criticism of China on Wednesday, using the opening statement of the U.S. presidential campaign's first debate to promise he would "crack down on China if and when they cheat."

    The language is not unusual for the Republican party presidential candidate, who has promised, if elected, to designate China as a currency manipulator on his first day in office.

    The man he is trying to unseat, President Barack Obama, has also vowed to get tough on China. Last month, he filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization, arguing that Beijing was unfairly subsidizing auto exports. It was the ninth such action taken during the Obama administration.

    Campaign ads




    Both campaigns have also released a flurry of China-themed campaign advertisements to attack the other's record. The ads have led some observers to say that each side is seemingly in competition over who can use the toughest language against the emerging power, which is often blamed for U.S. job losses.

    That does not sit well with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. The former top diplomat, who oversaw Washington's re-engagement with Beijing 40 years ago, says both candidates are using "extremely deplorable" language in describing China as a "cheat."

    Speaking at a forum at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington on Wednesday, Kissinger said he was "bothered" that both campaigns are "appealing to suspicion of China" in order to win votes.

    Kissinger has already endorsed Mitt Romney, but he says he does not support the candidate's promise to label China a currency manipulator, adding that he believes most China experts agree with him.

    A recent poll suggests Romney's strategy may be helping his candidacy. The poll, conducted by the Wall Street Journal and NBC News, found that 45 percent of registered voters think Romney would do a better job of handling the economic challenges posed by China. By comparison, only 37 percent said Obama would handle the situation better.

    For their part, Chinese officials have been careful not to take sides in the U.S. presidential campaign, instead insisting that both candidates are using the China issue to win votes. Several Chinese state media editorials have recently suggested that once elected, the winning candidate will realize the need to cooperate with China, the world's second largest economy.
    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Church State from: USA
    October 23, 2012 1:33 PM
    Did evasive, unaccountable, sworn to secrecy, and buzzword Republican presidential hopeful Willard Mitt Romney say he plans to get tough with China? I truly do not think he would do such a thing, especially since the religion to which he is a devote member (the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints - the Mormons) has for years pleaded with the Chinese government to allow Mormon missionaires to proselytize in their mainland country. The LDS church has settled for having only a "presence". Now as for controlling government spending. I certainly hope Mitt Romney makes it a priority to greatly reduce or better yet eliminate all of U.S. federal tax dollars spent to support the funding of the LDS Missionaries (60,000+ worldwide), and now in October 2012 the number of enrollees increasing from 700 to 4,000 per week since LDS church leaders lowered the eligibility of missionary minimum age of men to 18yrs and women to 19yrs old. There seems to be no maximum age limit (55+) so wealthy retired persons are eligible. Worst yet upon their return of serving their LDS missions, U.S. federal tax dollars will then be used to pay for the college education because they supposedly served as community "volunteers". The loophole being exploited is the proselytizing cannot be in "scripted" form (maybe consistent use of keywords is acceptable). The U.S. federal tax payers can hold Utah Senator Orin Hatch (senator of host state of Romney's 2002 Winter Olympics and state headquarters of the LDS/Mormon Church) and other LDS faithful lawmakers, responsible for sponsoring early amendments to and finally the 2009 Kennedy-Hatch bill Serve America Act (to triple the number of AmeriCorp volunteers to 250,000 and boost the educational stipend they recievie for tuition assistance). The irony of the entire situation is the LDS faithful pay minimum if no U.S. federal tax dollars (example Mitt Romeys multi-million dollar contributions to his church on his 2010 tax forms) to payout to the Hatch Serve America Act since their 15% tithings are considered eligibile federal tax deductions to a private non-profit. The LDS church collects a tithing for the Missionary fund why is that money not being used to support its growing worldwide missionary program?

    by: Wangchuk from: NYC
    October 06, 2012 1:00 AM
    Whoever wins the Presidency, it's time the US got tougher on Communist China & stopped kowtowing. Other Asian nations depend on the US to stand up to China. The CCP wants China to be the Middle Kingdom again. America must not allow China to rule the world.

    by: chan hui liu from: tian jin
    October 05, 2012 3:20 AM
    If rommney wins the presidency,The relations between china and USA will be a stepback, it is a disaster for both nations peoples who love peace.they both have a lot to do and talk ,why they both take "china" as a topic,just like idiots ,what is the future of usa,l cant see.it is just like political game,just for its political purpose by sacrifice american benifits

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Tensions Rising Ahead of South China Sea Rulingi
    X
    May 03, 2016 5:16 PM
    As the Philippines awaits an international arbitration ruling on a challenge to China's claims to nearly all of the South China Sea, it is already becoming clear that regardless of which way the decision goes, the dispute is intensifying. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
    Video

    Video Tensions Rising Ahead of South China Sea Ruling

    As the Philippines awaits an international arbitration ruling on a challenge to China's claims to nearly all of the South China Sea, it is already becoming clear that regardless of which way the decision goes, the dispute is intensifying. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
    Video

    Video Painting Captures President Lincoln Assassination Aftermath

    A newly restored painting captures the moments following President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination in 1865. It was recently unveiled at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, where America’s 16th president was shot. It is the only known painting by an eyewitness that captures the horror of that fateful night. VOA’s Julie Taboh tells us more about the painting and what it took to restore it to its original condition.
    Video

    Video Elephant Summit Results in $5M in Pledges, Presidential Support

    Attended and supported by three African presidents, a three-day anti-poaching summit has concluded in Kenya, resulting in $5 million in pledges and a united message to the world that elephants are worth more alive than dead. The summit culminated at the Nairobi National Park with the largest ivory burn in history. VOA’s Jill Craig attended the summit and has this report about the outcomes.
    Video

    Video Displaced By War, Syrian Artist Finds Inspiration Abroad

    Saudi-born Syrian painter Mohammad Zaza is among the millions who fled their home for an uncertain future after Syria's civil war broke out. Since fleeing Syria, Zaza has lived in Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan and now Turkey where his latest exhibition, “Earth is Blue like an Orange,” opened in Istanbul. He spoke with VOA about how being displaced by the Syrian civil war has affected the country's artists.
    Video

    Video Ethiopia’s Drought Takes Toll on Children

    Ethiopia is dealing with its worst drought in decades, thanks to El Nino weather patterns. An estimated 10 million people urgently need food aid. Six million of them are children, whose development may be compromised without sufficient help, Marthe van der Wolf reports for VOA from the Metahara district.
    Video

    Video Little Havana - a Slice of Cuban Culture in Florida

    Hispanic culture permeates everything in Miami’s Little Havana area: elderly men playing dominoes as they discuss politics, cigar rollers deep at work, or Cuban exiles talking with presidential candidates at a Cuban coffee window. With the recent rapprochement between Cuba and United States, one can only expect stronger ties between South Florida and Cuba.
    Video

    Video California Republicans Weigh Presidential Choices Amid Protests

    Republican presidential candidates have been wooing local party leaders in California, a state that could be decisive in selecting the party's nominee for U.S. president. VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports delegates to the California party convention have been evaluating choices, while front-runner Donald Trump drew hundreds of raucous protesters Friday.
    Video

    Video Kurdish Football Team Helps War-Torn City Cope

    With the conflict still raging across much of Turkey’s predominantly Kurdish southeast, between the rebel PKK and the Turkish state, many Kurds are trying to escape the turmoil by focusing on the success of their football team Amedspor in Diyarbakir. The club is increasingly becoming a symbol for Kurds, not only in Diyarbakir but beyond. Dorian Jones reports from southeast Turkey.
    Video

    Video ‘The Lights of Africa’ - Through the Eyes of 54 Artists

    An exhibition bringing together the work of 54 African artists, one from each country, is touring the continent after debuting at COP21 in Paris. Called "Lumières d'Afrique," the show centers on access to electricity and, more figuratively, ideas that enlighten. Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, the exhibition's first stop.
    Video

    Video Florida’s Weeki Wachee ‘Mermaids’ Make a Splash

    Since 1947, ‘mermaids’ have fascinated tourists at central Florida’s Weeki Wachee Springs State Park with their fluid movements and synchronized ballet. Performing underwater has its challenges, including cold temperatures and a steady current, as VOA’s Lin Yang and Joseph Mok report.
    Video

    Video Somali, African Union Forces Face Resurgent Al-Shabab

    The Islamic State terror group claimed its first attack in Somalia earlier this week, though the claim has not been verified by forces on the ground. Meanwhile, al-Shabab militants have stepped up their attacks as Somalia prepares for elections later this year. Henry Ridgwell reports there are growing frustrations among Somalia’s Western backers over the country’s slow progress in forming its own armed forces to establish security after 25 years of chaos.
    Video

    Video Nigerians Feel Bite of Buhari Economic Policy

    Despite the global drop in the price of oil, Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has refused to allow the country's currency to devalue, leading to a shortage of foreign exchange. Chris Stein reports from Lagos businessmen and consumers are feeling the impact as the country deals with a severe fuel shortage.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora