News / Middle East

    Biden Calls on Iraqis to ‘Pull Together’

    • A member of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces stands guard during an intensive security deployment in Baghdad's Amiriya district, June 18, 2014.
    • Shi'ite volunteers who joined the Iraqi army to fight the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant gesture with their weapons in Baghdad, June 18, 2014.
    • A member of Iraqi security forces stands guard in front of volunteers who joined the army to fight the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Baghdad, June 17, 2014.
    • Shi'ite tribal fighters raise their weapons and chant slogans against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Basra, Iraq, June 16, 2014.
    • Mehdi Army fighters loyal to Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr march during military-style training in the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, June 16, 2014.
    • Iraqi army soldiers stand guard in Baghdad, June 16, 2014.
    • A volunteer who joined the Iraqi Army to fight the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant holds a weapon during a parade in Al-Fdhiliya district, eastern Baghdad, June 15, 2014.
    • A vehicle belonging to Kurdish security forces fires a multiple rocket launcher during clashes with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant on the outskirts of Diyala, Iraq, June 14, 2014.
    • This image posted on a militant website on June 14, 2014 appears to show militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant with captured Iraqi soldiers wearing plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq.
    • This image posted on a militant website on June 14, 2014 appears to show militants from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant with captured Iraqi soldiers wearing plain clothes after taking over a base in Tikrit, Iraq.
    Images from Iraq
    VOA News
    U.S. Vice President Joe Biden says "urgent assistance is clearly required" in Iraq, but he has not provided details on any U.S. aid.
     
    Biden made the comment Tuesday during a stop in Brasilia, where he met with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. He also said Iraqis must "pull together" to end sectarian violence.
     
    Meanwhile, Iraqi officials say at least 44 prisoners died in a militant assault on a prison in the city of Baquba.
     
    Reports Tuesday differed as to whether militants or security officials killed the detainees. Morgue reports say the dead had close-range bullet wounds to the head and chest.
     
    The French news agency AFP quoted a security spokesman for Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki as saying the insurgents killed the prisoners while carrying out their attack late Monday.

    Iraq's Shi'ite rulers defied Western calls on Tuesday to reach out to Sunnis to defuse the uprising in the country's north, declaring a boycott of Iraq's main Sunni political bloc and accusing Sunni power Saudi Arabia of promoting "genocide."

    A push for political outreach
     
    Washington has made clear it wants al-Maliki to embrace Sunni politicians as a condition of U.S. support to fight a lightning advance by forces from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) toward Baghdad, Reuters reported.

    Territory within Syria and Iraq, ISIL’s Planned Islamic StateTerritory within Syria and Iraq, ISIL’s Planned Islamic State
    x
    Territory within Syria and Iraq, ISIL’s Planned Islamic State
    Territory within Syria and Iraq, ISIL’s Planned Islamic State

    But the Shi'ite prime minister has moved in the opposite direction, announcing a crackdown on politicians and officers he considers "traitors."

    On Tuesday, Maliki fired four top security officers for having "failed to fulfill their professional and military duties," Reuters reported, citing a government statement read on state TV. 

    The firings come a week after Sunni fighters took control of the northwest city of Mosul and several other cities.

    Among those fired were Lieutenant General Medhi Sabah Gharawi, the top officer in Nineveh province where the militants gained ground, and commander Hidayat Abdulraheem, who fled a battle. The statement said a military court would try him in absentia.   

    Blaming neighbors  

    Maliki also has lashed out at neighboring Sunni countries for stoking militancy.

    The latest target of his government's fury was Saudi Arabia, the main Sunni power in the Gulf, which funds Sunni militants in neighboring Syria but denies it is behind ISIL.
     
    "We hold them responsible for supporting these groups financially and morally, and for the outcome of that - which includes crimes that may qualify as genocide: the spilling of Iraqi blood, the destruction of Iraqi state institutions and historic and religious sites," the Iraqi government said of Riyadh in a statement, according to Reuters.
     
    Maliki has blamed Saudi Arabia for supporting militants in the past, but the severe language was unprecedented.

    On Monday, Riyadh blamed sectarianism in Baghdad for fuelling the violence.

     
    ISIL Attacks in Iraq
     
    • June 10: Mosul captured
    • June 11: Tikrit and parts of Beiji captured
    • June 12: Samarra and Dhuluiya captured
    • June 13: Jalawla and Saadiyah captured
    • June 14: Clashes in Ishaki and Dujail
    • June 16: Tal Afar captured

    Baquba violence

    Iraqi Army commanders insist they have regained the upper hand in the battle against Sunni militants in the Baquba area.

    However, numerous eyewitness reports said the militants captured, at least briefly, parts of the town of Baquba, about 60 kilometers north of Baghdad.

    Other reports said the nearby town of Mufraq was overrun by militants, who captured the police station as well.

    Iraqi military spokesman Qassem Mohammed Atta told state TV that 52 prisoners inside the station's jail were killed in the attack.

    Meanwhile, Iraq’s biggest oil refinery, Baiji, has been shut down and its foreign staff evacuated, refinery officials said on Tuesday, adding that local staff remain in place and the military is still in control of the facility.

    The shutdown has led to parts of the country being deprived of fuel and power.

    Eyewitnesses said Sunni militants captured the Qaim border post with Syria.  Kurdish peshmerga fighters took the Yaroubia border post with Syria several days ago, after government forces reportedly fled.

    UN leader urges dialogue

    Earlier Tuesday, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged al-Maliki to reach out to all factions and have a more inclusive approach to his government, amid a surge in violence by Sunni Islamist militants who have taken control of several Iraqi cities.

    Ban, speaking to reporters Tuesday in Geneva, said he is very concerned about the rapidly deteriorating security situation in Iraq, including reports of mass summary executions by ISIL.
     
    He said there is a real risk of further sectarian violence on a massive scale within Iraq and beyond its borders. 

    Ban said he spoke to al-Maliki, urging the prime minister to start an inclusive dialogue in search of a solution.

    "Political instability often leads to a breeding ground of extremism and terrorism to infiltrate into society," Ban said.

    "Therefore, I have been very urging and I am urging again that all the leaders in the world, they should really pay attention to the aspirations of the people before their aspirations or grievances are set into political instability," he added.

    Ban said he would not predict whether the unstable situation in Iraq and in neighboring Syria, which is in its fourth year of war, could erupt into a regional war.

    However, Ban told VOA he is concerned about the possibility of Iraq breaking up.

    "What is important at this time is that the Iraqi government should have one state, whether it is a Sunni or Shi'ite or Kurds," Ban said. People "should be able to harmoniously live together, respecting and upholding human rights and values of the United Nations.

    "I am very concerned about all these kind of situations that are happening here and there - in Africa, in Middle East and elsewhere," he said.
     
    U.S. Troops Deploying to Iraq
     
    • Involves up to 275 U.S. military personnel
    • Provides support and security for U.S. personnel and embassy in Baghdad
    • Assists in temporary relocation of embassy staff to U.S. consulates in Basra and Irbil and to Amman, Jordan
    • Military personnel are entering Iraq with consent of Iraqi government

    Source: White House
    US sending military personnel

    President Barack Obama said 275 U.S. military personnel will be sent to Iraq to help provide security to the embassy in Baghdad and U.S. personnel. The administration on Monday sought to reassure Americans that the deployment is not another open-ended commitment of troops to Iraq.

    "This force is deploying for the purpose of protecting U.S. citizens and property, if necessary, and is equipped for combat," Obama said in a letter to lawmakers. "This force will remain in Iraq until the security situation becomes such that it is no longer needed."

    Obama's notification to Congress Monday also said the move has the consent of the Iraqi government.

    U.S. officials said 170 troops already are in Iraq, and about 100 more could be deployed as needed. Officials say the soldiers will help relocate some staff from the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

    The embassy itself remains open.

    Other options under consideration

    While the president has ruled out sending ground forces back into Iraq, he met with his national security team Monday to consider other options.

    They include possible air strikes against the Sunni militants, who already control large parts of northern Iraq and have vowed to seize Baghdad from the Shi'ite-led government.

    The sudden advance by Sunni insurgents has the potential to scramble alliances in the Middle East, with the United States and Iran both saying they could cooperate against a common enemy, all but unprecedented since the 1979 Iranian revolution.

    However, the Pentagon said it has no plans to enter into military cooperation with the Iranians in any action in Iraq.
     
    Iran, the leading Shi'ite power, has close ties to al-Maliki and the Shi'ite parties that have held power in Baghdad since U.S. forces toppled Saddam Hussein in 2003.

    While both Washington and Tehran are close allies of Baghdad, they have not cooperated in the past.
     
    In a diplomatic rapprochement, U.S. ally Britain said it planned to reopen its embassy in Tehran, where a mob ransacked the mission in 2011.

    A top State Department official said U.S. and Iranian diplomats met briefly Monday on the sidelines of nuclear talks in Vienna. The official said talks with the Iranians will not include any discussion of military coordination.

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry told Yahoo News that the Iranians first have to be prepared to do something to respect Iraqi integrity and sovereignty before Washington makes a decision.

    State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said this is not just a military challenge for Iraq's government. She said Iraqi leaders must make a sincere effort to govern in a nonsectarian manner and listen to the legitimate grievances of the Shi'ite, Sunni and Kurdish communities.

    Iraq's Sunni minority bitterly complained that the Shi'ite government sidelined it and ignored its problems -- leading to terrorism and setting the stage for the current uprising by the militants.

    Sunni involvement in ISIL

    Sheikh Ali Hatem, who heads the influential Sunni Dulaim tribe, told Saudi-owned al Arabiya TV that "only 3 to 5 percent of Sunni fighters belong to ISIL."

    Mosul Governor Athil Nujaifi argued several days ago that "many different Sunni groups" have joined together to fight the Maliki government.
     
    Middle East analyst Nadim Shehadi of Chatham House in London said he cannot give an exact figure on the percentage of ISIL fighters battling the government, but he thinks that the "ISIL element is a small minority."

    Shehadi said he thinks the current rout of government forces is due in part to the abrupt U.S. withdrawal from Iraq in 2011.
     
    "This is in a way the result of the way the [U.S.] administration withdrew from Iraq. It created a vacuum. It was allied to (Sunni) tribesmen and fought the Islamic State of Iraq with them," Shehadi said.

    "But then it abandoned the scene and they suffered from the policies of Maliki and they were in a way co-opted by the former Ba'athists, who also work with the Islamic State of Iraq,” he added.
     
    Luis Ramirez contributed to this report from the White House. Lisa Schlein contributed to this report from Geneva. Edward Yeranian contributed to this report from Cairo. Some information provided by Reuters.

    You May Like

    Taj Mahal Battles New Threat from Insects

    Swarms of insects are proliferating in the heavily contaminated waters of the Yamuna River, which flows behind the 17th century monument

    Self-doubt, Cultural Barriers Hinder Cambodian Women in Tech

    Longtime Cambodian tech observer Sok Sikieng says that although more women have joined profession in recent years, there remain significant factors hindering women from reaching tech potential

    Trans-Adriatic Pipeline to Boost European Energy Security

    $4.5 billion-pipeline will become operational in 2020 and will deliver gas from Azerbaijan’s Shah Deniz II field to southern Italy

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 3
     Previous   Next 
    by: Not Again from: Canada
    June 17, 2014 12:18 PM
    As per norm, Maliki has no interest in running a democratic multi-ethnic state; he never did. As soon as the US left, he started persecuting the Sunni politicians... and now we see the massive disaster he has brought about. Pres. Obama, once again is being thrust upon a situation which is not resolvable, a conflict that started over a milenia ago. Centuries of fighting has not brought about a peaceful resolution of the Shia - Sunni conflict; the dictator Saddam Hussein persecuted the Shia, now the administration of Maliki persecutes the Sunni.

    Maliki and Assad are responsible in part for this conflict's continued escalation, giving rise to an extremely brutal terrorist organization, ISIL; it persecutes everyone that does not bend to their will, but of special attention, it is focusing on the Shia population. The latest round of Shia/Sunni fighting was started in the brutal Syrian civil war, with the massive killing of mainly Syrian Sunni civilians. It is a bad situation all around. The best of US intentions, will do very little to resolve the situation = no trust between Shia and Sunni, in any case both groups have their very bad extremists.

    Right from the beginning of the conflict, the big weapons were a major killer of civilians, that has not changed. More needs to be done to get rid of big weapon systems, prevent the spread of the conflict, and try to separate the Sunni from its Sunni extremists, and the Shia from its Shia extremists.
    If Maliki does not get a government of national unity in place, every one is looking at a decade and beyond a decade, of serious brutal wars in the ME. Very bad for global stability.


    by: mountbaten from: india
    June 17, 2014 11:52 AM
    These jihad-is who fight war or rather terrorist innocent people in the name of jihad or holy war believe in barbarian world which is totally irrelevant in modern scientific age and as years ,centuries pass by these people go in reverse direction of human civilization so if sane people who love this mother planet earth and wants sane people who love humanity to live then please rise to the occasion and use antidote (nuclear action) to snuff these people from the face of the Gobe and bury them in sea once for all.
    In Response

    by: Tom from: canada
    June 17, 2014 12:34 PM
    Maleki is the source of problem. since he is an islamic regime puppet, he cannot get along with sunni people. He has to be removed. USA would make another big mistake if it intervens to support Maleki government. Iran and Maleki want to deceive USA to take action aginst sunni rebels. ISIS is just one group. this is an uprising against shia dictatorship

    by: Dave1967 from: Tennessee
    June 17, 2014 11:47 AM
    Al Maliki needs to be removed. Hopefully sometime soon a coup will occur in Iraq and remove him. If it doesn't happen ISIS will remove him.

    by: AdesinaTayo Segar from: North Charleston, Sc
    June 17, 2014 11:35 AM
    If we turn are back on the people of Iraq than that means all the blood we how have pridely server in that country from 2003 - 2010 had shed or blood for nothing! We must do what ever we came out side of sending more troop's in there so that our enemy's cannot have a soild base of operation to carry ot terrist act's againsit us!
    In Response

    by: Charles Jensen
    June 17, 2014 1:08 PM
    Which people of Iraq should we not turn our backs on? The Sunnis? The Shiites? The Kurds?

    That is the problem with taking action in Iraq....we will be effectively choosing sides which is not in our interest. Let that feckless Maliki sort it out. Better that Muslims are killing Muslims, than killing Americans---something Bush never understood.

    by: meanbill from: USA
    June 17, 2014 11:32 AM
    MY OPINION? -- (Maliki is right) -- and this attack on the Iraq government is led by Sunni extremists/terrorists including the (ISIL) from Syria -- (armed and trained in Sunni Jordan and Turkey by the US, EU, NATO, and Sunni allies), -- (AND?) -- the extremists/terrorists including the (ISIL) have now merged with the (US trained) Sunni Security Forces in an attack to overthrow the Shia led Iraq government....

    MY OPINION? -- (Don't trust this US President who bowed to the Sunni Saudi King) -- that leads the US government, that helped arm and train the Sunni extremists/terrorists including the (ISIL) in Sunni Jordan and Turkey -- (AND ALSO?) -- had the US arm and train the Sunni Iraq Security Forces that revolted and joined the (ISIL) in an attack to overthrow the Shia led Iraq government.

    BEWARE? -- (It just seems this US President that bowed to the Sunni Saudi King, and had the US arm and train the Sunni extremists/terrorists including the Sunni (ISIL) in Sunni Jordan and Turkey, (and also had the US arm and train), the Sunni Security Forces attacking the Iraq government. -- This US President just has to be aligned with the Sunni, doesn't he?) -- (AND IF?) -- this US President wants a cease-fire, and to split the country in pieces, the world will know, who's Sunni evil plan it was, won't we?

    by: Gregg from: Colorado
    June 17, 2014 11:31 AM
    Gotta love U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki
    speaking of this as if she's at a Sunday school class.
    O.K. now Sunni extreme children, let's all get along in the next 5 minutes.

    by: Idmacrae from: Seattle
    June 17, 2014 11:29 AM
    Who is going to pay for another invasion? The Republicans are not falling all over themselves cutting the budget in other non-military areas to pay for what it seems they want - another invasion. Nor are they offering to increase the debt ceiling to pay for another war. Their Sacred Budget Principals fly out the window when they see a chance to have another war.
    In Response

    by: loishildebrand from: hickory northcarolina
    June 17, 2014 1:20 PM

    True that!

    by: Judy from: Redmond
    June 17, 2014 11:28 AM
    Are there any Sunni politicians ready to call for peace, and for the murders of soldiers to stop? If so, they are not “traitors”. But actually, I'm guessing that the Iraqi leader, Nouri al-Maliki has it right when he calls these crimes genocide. What is intended is at least cultural genocide.

    by: hamishdad
    June 17, 2014 11:25 AM
    We don't need an embassy in Iraq. It never should have been built, and is certainly not worth defending.

    by: GrinOlsson from: Alaska
    June 17, 2014 11:24 AM
    We need to face the fact that the real villian in the Middle East is SAUDI ARABIA who finances the terrorists as well as 09/11/2001 and Chechnya, Nigeria, and the whole lot.

    President Bush and associates was paid $1.5 billion in contracts to attack the wrong nations of Iraq and Afghanistan instead of Saudi Arabia. The quicker we exterminate this nation the quicker peace will be achieved in the world.
    In Response

    by: John Poole from: Ardmore, PA
    June 19, 2014 5:41 PM
    I think it not only unwise to talk about exterminating whole groups of people but also impractical. It might take a few more centuries for the Middle East to sort things out in the way Europe took centuries to define borders and nationalities. It doesn't look promising for in those earlier times they had only swords and pikes. Unfortunately our WMDs have outpaced our psycho-sexual evolution. We could get lucky but that sure isn't a way to run an evolution.
    Comments page of 3
     Previous   Next 

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Vietnamese-American Youth Optimistic About Obama's Visit to Vietnami
    X
    Elizabeth Lee
    May 22, 2016 6:04 AM
    U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Vietnam later this month comes at a time when Vietnam is seeking stronger ties with the United States. Many Vietnamese Americans, especially the younger generation, are optimistic Obama’s trip will help further reconciliation between the two former foes. Elizabeth Lee has more from the community called "Little Saigon" located south of Los Angeles.
    Video

    Video Vietnamese-American Youth Optimistic About Obama's Visit to Vietnam

    U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Vietnam later this month comes at a time when Vietnam is seeking stronger ties with the United States. Many Vietnamese Americans, especially the younger generation, are optimistic Obama’s trip will help further reconciliation between the two former foes. Elizabeth Lee has more from the community called "Little Saigon" located south of Los Angeles.
    Video

    Video First-generation, Afghan-American Student Sets Sights on Basketball Glory

    Their parents are immigrants to the United States. They are kids who live between two worlds -- their parents' homeland and the U.S. For many of them, they feel most "American" at school. It can be tricky balancing both worlds. In this report, produced by Beth Mendelson, Arash Arabasadi tells us about one Afghan-American student who seems to be coping -- one shot at a time.
    Video

    Video Newest US Citizens, Writing the Next Great Chapter

    While universities across the United States honor their newest graduates this Friday, many immigrants in downtown Manhattan are celebrating, too. One hundred of them, representing 31 countries across four continents, graduated as U.S. citizens, joining the ranks of 680,000 others every year in New York and cities around the country.
    Video

    Video Vietnam Sees Strong Economic Growth Despite Incomplete Reforms

    Vietnam has transformed its communist economy to become one of the world's fastest-growing nations. While the reforms are incomplete, multinational corporations see a profitable future in Vietnam and have made major investments -- as VOA's Jim Randle reports.
    Video

    Video Qatar Denies World Cup Corruption

    The head of Qatar’s organizing committee for the 2022 World Cup insists his country's bid to host the soccer tournament was completely clean, despite the corruption scandals that have rocked the sport’s governing body, FIFA. Hassan Al-Thawadi also said new laws would offer protection to migrants working on World Cup construction projects. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
    Video

    Video Infrastructure Funding Puts Cambodia on Front Line of International Politics

    When leaders of the world’s seven most developed economies meet in Japan next week, demands for infrastructure investment world wide will be high on the agenda. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s push for “quality infrastructure investment” throughout Asia has been widely viewed as a counter to the rise of Chinese investment flooding into region.
    Video

    Video Democrats Fear Party Unity a Casualty in Clinton-Sanders Battle

    Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton claimed a narrow victory in Tuesday's Kentucky primary even as rival Bernie Sanders won in Oregon. Tensions between the two campaigns are rising, prompting fears that the party will have a difficult time unifying to face the presumptive Republican nominee, Donald Trump. VOA national correspondent Jim Malone has more from Washington.
    Video

    Video Portrait of a Transgender Marriage: Husband and Wife Navigate New Roles

    As controversy continues in North Carolina over the use of public bathrooms by transgender individuals, personal struggles with gender identity that were once secret are now coming to light. VOA’s Tina Trinh explored the ramifications for one couple as part of trans.formation, a series of stories on transgender issues.
    Video

    Video Amerikan Hero Flips Stereotype of Middle Eastern Character

    An Iranian American comedian is hoping to connect with American audiences through a film that inverts some of Hollywood's stereotypes about Middle Eastern characters. Sama Dizayee reports.
    Video

    Video Budding Young Inventors Tackle City's Problems with 3-D Printing

    Every city has problems, and local officials and politicians are often frustrated by their inability to solve them. But surprising solutions can come from unexpected places. Students in Baltimore. Maryland, took up the challenge to solve problems they identified in their city, and came up with projects and products to make a difference. VOA's June Soh has more on a digital fabrication competition primarily focused on 3-D design and printing. Carol Pearson narrates.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora