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Obama Discusses US Surveillance, Iran, Economy at Year-End News Conference

President Barack Obama speaks during his end-of-the-year news conference in the Brady Press Room at the White House in Washington, Dec. 20, 2013.
President Barack Obama speaks during his end-of-the-year news conference in the Brady Press Room at the White House in Washington, Dec. 20, 2013.
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— In an end-of-year news conference, President Barack Obama discussed U.S. electronic surveillance by the National Security Agency, the recent budget deal between Democratic and Republican lawmakers, the flawed rollout of his health care reform law, his low approval ratings, and nuclear talks with Iran.  

Obama began by pointing to news he says bodes well for 2014 - that the U.S. economy grew at a 4.1 percent pace in the third quarter of the year, the strongest in nearly two years, with unemployment the lowest in five years.

"More Americans are finding work and experiencing the pride of a paycheck. Our businesses are positioned for new growth and new jobs. And I firmly believe that 2014 can be a breakthrough year for America," said the president.

He said more work is needed to provide better opportunities for middle-class Americans, adding that he hopes Washington will not be "condemned to endless gridlock" in 2014.

Obama provided a summary of accomplishments, and work still to be done, overseas.

"This year we have demonstrated that with clear-eyed principled diplomacy, we can pursue a new path to a world that is more secure, a future where Iran does not build a nuclear weapon, a future where Syria's chemical weapons stockpiles are destroyed," said Obama.

Domestic Issues Dominate Obama's Year End News Conferencei
X
December 21, 2013 1:41 PM
U.S. President Barack Obama's last news conference of the year focused on domestic issues, especially the country's controversial health care law and security surveillance programs. He also praised the nation's economic growth and acknowledged more work needed to be done. One of the few foreign policy questions he addressed involved Iran and its nuclear program. VOA's Zlatica Hoke has more on the Friday briefing.

The interim deal between the United States and other permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, plus Germany, provides Iran with limited sanctions relief in exchange for halting parts of its nuclear program.

Obama appealed again to U.S. lawmakers not to pass legislation imposing new sanctions on Iran, which he has threatened to veto, while a final nuclear deal is negotiated in coming months.

"It's not going to be hard for us to turn the dials back, strengthen sanctions even further. I'll work with members of Congress to put even more pressure on Iran. But there is no reason to do it right now," he said.

Another major issue was NSA surveillance, and 46 recommendations from a special panel formed after revelations by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

Obama declined to directly comment on Snowden, who faces felony charges, or to suggestions that Snowden, who received temporary asylum from Russia, receive amnesty.

He said there was another way, however, to have a debate about U.S. intelligence capabilities besides the method Snowden chose. "As important and as necessary as this debate has been, it is also important to keep in mind that this has done unnecessary damage to U.S. intelligence capabilities and to U.S. diplomacy."

He said Americans are "rightly concerned about the possibility of misuse" of the data that the National Security Agency is collecting.

He said the spy programs have to balance the country's need to protect itself against the need to protect Americans' civil liberties and privacy. NSA has collected a vast storehouse of data about Americans' phone calls - the numbers they have called, the time and length of the calls.

"We need this intelligence," Mr. Obama said. "We can't unilaterally 'disarm.'"

But he said the surveillance programs are "only going to work if the American people have trust" in them.

Obama will speak to Americans and the world in January, likely before his State of the Union address, about his decisions on surveillance policy.

Asked if 2013 was the worst year of his presidency, Obama said "that is not how I think of it," but acknowledged that health care reform problems contributed to his current low approval ratings.

"My polls have gone up and down a lot through the course of my career. I mean if I was interested in polls, I wouldn't have run for president," he said.

He also looked ahead to the planned withdrawal of the last U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014, and he said the U.S. remains vigilant to protect against terrorist attacks.

After the hour-long news conference, he was asked what his new year's resolution would be, and replied, "to be nicer to the White House press corps."

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by: Change Iran Now from: USA
December 21, 2013 9:36 PM
During all these efforts by Sec. Kerry and President Obama to cut a deal at almost any price, it amazes me that there has never been a mention of including concessions on Iran's human rights abuses. If you are going to negotiate with a nation under the belief that their word is their bond, behavior is a pretty important component of any deal. Simply taking a regime's leaders at their word without any demonstrable proof is naive at best and stupid at worse. If the US were to hold Iran accountable for example in halting public executions, releasing political prisoners and loosening restrictions on a free press and internet and satellite TV access to outside news sources, then you might be persuaded to believe that Iran is indeed wanting to change. But absent any of those moves, there is little to show that Iran's leadership -- at its core -- has really changed at all and thus can't be trusted to hold up its end of any nuclear bargain.


by: Dr. Q.R. Gravyfart from: D.C.
December 21, 2013 11:36 AM
One of the more jaw-dropping moments to emerge out of 60 Minutes’ profile piece on the National Security Agency was when NSA Director Keith Alexander had to ask permission from his superiors on whether or not he could answer a question!

The report, headed up by John Miller, himself a former FBI and National Intelligence official, was basically a soapbox for the NSA to downplay its malfeasance in light of the Edward Snowden revelations.

“Did the NSA actually find a foreign power that had identified this capability and discussed using it offensively,” Miller asks Alexander at the 2:45 mark in the clip above.

Alexander is about to speak but then turns his head towards what Miller describes as a “crowd of people in the dark,” and states, “I need time out on that.”

According to Miller, Alexander then asked this group of people, “Can I answer that?”

Bear in mind that Alexander is the highest ranking individual in the National Security Agency and moreover a four-star general. Alexander is also Chief of the Central Security Service (CHCSS) and Commander of U.S. Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM).

If Alexander is supposedly the top guy at the NSA, why does he need to ask shadowy advisors lurking in the background if he can even address a question???

And who exactly are this group of shadowy people who have the power to give orders to the Director of the NSA and why don’t we know their names??!

Miller and his team said that a group of 20 “minders” would follow the reporters everywhere they went and carefully monitor each individual interview they conducted with NSA employees.

One interview clip features a woman in the background who states, “please stop….back off” as another NSA worker begins to answer a question.

Although Miller, himself a former Associate Deputy Director of National Intelligence, insisted that the NSA story would not be a “puff piece,” that’s precisely what it turns out to be since virtually all of the assertions made by NSA employees which justify mass surveillance go unchallenged.

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