News / USA

Obama in Boston: 'A Bomb Can't Beat Us'

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during an interfaith memorial service at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing in Boston, April 18, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during an interfaith memorial service at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing in Boston, April 18, 2013.
Three days after the bombings at the Boston Marathon, President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, local officials and religious leaders honored those killed and wounded - and the spirit of Bostonians - at a service in Boston.  

The Obamas were seated in the front pew at Boston's Church of the Holy Cross as religious leaders paid tribute to the dead, wounded, first responders, and the people of Boston.

Reverend Liz Walker of the Roxbury Presbyterian Church spoke about strength of community in the face of evil.

"We are members of one another, a community of resilience, hard-pressed but not defeated, confounded but not consumed," she said.

There were tributes from other Christian denominations, and Jewish and Islamic faith leaders.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at an interfaith memorial service for the victims of the bombing at the Boston Marathon at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston, Massachusetts, April 18, 2013.
  • People attend the interfaith memorial service at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing in Boston, April 18, 2013.
  • Nursing students Katie Robinson, left, and Megan Beach listen to a broadcast on their phones outside an interfaith service attended by President Barack Obama at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross, held in the wake of Boston Marathon explosions.
  • U.S. President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive for an inter-faith memorial service for the victims of the bombing at the Boston Marathon in Boston, April 18, 2013.
  • A memento of flowers in a running shoe rests at a makeshift memorial in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood, April 18, 2013, a few blocks from the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
  • Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, April 18, 2013, before the House Homeland Security Committee. Napolitano says the FBI wants to speak with two men seen in at least one video from the Boston Marathon, but she says she isn't calling them suspects.
  • A line of investigators is form as they enter a building adjacent to one of the blast sites near the Boston Marathon finish line, in Boston, April 18, 2013.
  • Investigators inspect the area between the two blast sites near the Boston Marathon finish line, Thursday, April 18, 2013, in Boston. Boston remained under a heavy security presence, with scores of National Guard troops gathering among armored Humvees in
  • Local residents attend a candlelight vigil in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, April 16, 2013, where eight-year-old victim Martin Richard lived.
  • Investigators comb through the post finish line area of the Boston Marathon at Boylston Street, two days after two bombs exploded just before the finish line, April 17, 2013, in Boston.
  • A worker returns a bag containing a runner's personal effects near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, after explosions killed three and injured more than 140 in Boston, April 16, 2013.

Mayor Tom Menino paid tribute to those killed in the attacks: 8-year-old Martin Richard, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, and 23-year-old Chinese student Lu Lingzi.

Saying nothing can "tear down" the resilience of Boston, he said the city and its marathon will come back even stronger next year.

"It will push us forward, push us, thousands and thousands and thousands of people, across the finish line next year. Because this is Boston - a city with courage, compassion and strength that knows no bounds," said Menino.

"We will have accountability without vengeance, vigilance without fear, and we will remember, I hope and pray, long after the buzz of Boylston Street is back and the media has turned its attention elsewhere, that the grace this tragedy exposed is the best of who we are," said Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick.

Related video report by Carolyn Presutti

President Obama Offers Solace and Defiance To Mourners in Bostoni
X
April 20, 2013 5:12 PM
Boston continues to grieve after the double bombing on Monday. On Thursday, President Barack Obama comforted Bostonians during an interfaith church service in the city. VOA's Carolyn Presutti tells us how an old American city is trying to heal.

Deadly bombings in the United States

  • April 15, 2013: Twin blasts at the Boston Marathon kill at least 3, injure more than 140
  • September 11, 2001: Hijacked jets crash into World Trade Center, Pentagon and a Pennsylvania field killing nearly 3,000
  • July 27, 1996: Atlanta Summer Olympics bombing kills 2, injures more than 100
  • April 19, 1995: Car bomb at Oklahoma City federal building kills 168, injures more than 500
  • February 26, 1993: Van explosion in World Trade Center garage kills 6, injures more than 1,000
  • December 29, 1975: Bomb at New York's LaGuardia Airport kills 11, injures 75
  • September 16, 1920: Bombing in New York's Wall Street area kills 40, injures hundreds
Obama called the resolve of the people of Boston "the greatest rebuke" to those who committed "this heinous act."

"If they sought to intimidate us, to terrorize us, to shake us from those values that Deval described, the values that make us who we are as Americans, well it should be pretty clear by now that they picked the wrong city to do it. Not here in Boston," the president said.

Obama said Bostonians "will run again" and the country will be with them on their long journey of recovery.

To those who perpetrated the attacks and anyone who would do harm to Americans, he said, "Yes we will find you, and yes you will face justice."

White House officials said the Obamas visited with family members of Krystle Campbell, one of the three killed in the marathon attacks.

Obama also stopped at Massachusetts General Hospital, where many of the wounded from the attacks are undergoing treatment.

You May Like

Video Afghan Refugees Complain of Harassment in Pakistan

Afghan officials and human rights organizations assert that Pakistani authorities are using deadly attack at school in Peshawar as pretext to push out Afghan refugees More

At Boston Bombing Hearing, Sides Spar Over Boat

At final pre-trial hearing, lawyers for suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, prosecutors disagree on whether vessel where he hid from police can be shown to jurors More

Iran Judiciary 'Picks' Lawyer for Detained WP Reporter

Masoud Shafii has been attempting to secure official recognition as Rezaian’s attorney, but is not allowed to see his client in prison More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: riano baggy from: ina
April 18, 2013 9:54 PM
with my deepesth sympathy for the victim"s family. I condemned this momemts to kill the innocent people. The spirit boston marathon not down by this blast but to make me stronger and reinforcement our solidarity to counter terroism actions by hold hands by hands. we not alone, all over the world support to counter the barbarian actions.GBU AMERICA

by: FBI from: USA
April 18, 2013 7:50 PM
The FBI has attempted to blacklist photos which show men working for a private military organization wearing heavy backpacks and appearing to take part in a drill at the Boston Marathon, instead focusing on two other individuals while proclaiming, “other photos will not be deemed credible.”

As Infowars has documented over the last two days, photos taken from the scene of the blast show numerous individuals wearing identical clothing while carrying heavy black backpacks, talking into cellphones and in one case placing one of the backpacks on the ground.

Infowars reporter Dan Bidondi was at the FBI press conference and attempted to get questions answered about bomb drills that eyewitnesses said were taking place on the morning of the marathon, but was ignored and subsequently confronted by two large men at the end of the conference.

In not only ignoring but aggressively attempting to discredit the photos showing men who are likely employees of the private security firm Craft International on the scene of the bombings engaged in some kind of drill, the FBI has signaled its intention to continue the cover-up of what really happened.

by: Truth is coming out from: USA
April 18, 2013 5:58 PM
What does it all mean?

First off, let’s get the attacks of the moron trolls out of the way — people who will say these photos are a “conspiracy theory.”

How are photos of actual people at the event a conspiracy theory?

They aren’t. In real police work, they’re called “evidence,” and the people in these photos should be persons of interest.

But they aren’t. The entire mainstream media and law enforcement apparatus is now pretending these men don’t exist. (Now that’s their conspiracy theory!)

We all know, however, that The Craft operatives don’t work for free. They aren’t a band of volunteers. And that means somebody paid them to be at the event.

Who paid The Craft to be there? And what was their mission?

Why is their existence at the Boston marathon being memory-holed? Why are they not “persons of interest” in the investigation?

Why do they carry radiation detectors? What’s in their backpacks? (A ham sandwich?)

The fact that the media refuses to even acknowledge the existence of these private military operatives is quite telling all by itself.

by: fred from: usa
April 18, 2013 4:31 PM
how come when you mention acts of terrorism on us soil, waco isn't mentioned? slick willy terrorized 72 men, women, and children for days and then incinerated them.

terrorism by government with assault weapons and tanks.

take note...that's what's coming for the gun owners.

by: reubenr from: New York
April 18, 2013 3:53 PM
I will probably regret saying this but I am not much for eulogies of any kind, and even when the President steps up and tries to say that a "Bomb can't beat us," we have to be real and say that it has. I think one of the things that is missing in the entire discussion is the havoc we have caused around the world for the last dozen years or so (far more than that in reality), and all the innocent lives that we have taken and given in the quest for what I don't even remember. If you just think how angry we are, we must admit that we have made others equally and even more angry. Taking innocent lives has become the name of the game. It is today's nuclear bomb. We need to clean up our act, world wide, and it might help to start with Israel and the Middle East.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US Supreme Court Hears Hijab Discrimination Casei
X
Katherine Gypson
February 25, 2015 11:30 PM
The U.S. Supreme Court has heard opening arguments in a workplace religious discrimination case that examines whether a clothing store can refuse to hire a young woman for wearing the headscarf she says is a symbol of her Muslim faith. Katherine Gypson reports from the Supreme Court.
Video

Video US Supreme Court Hears Hijab Discrimination Case

The U.S. Supreme Court has heard opening arguments in a workplace religious discrimination case that examines whether a clothing store can refuse to hire a young woman for wearing the headscarf she says is a symbol of her Muslim faith. Katherine Gypson reports from the Supreme Court.
Video

Video Falling Gas Prices Hurt Nascent Illinois Hydraulic Fracturing Industry

Falling oil prices are helping consumers purchase cheaper petroleum at the pump. But that’s made hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” less economically viable for the companies in the United States invested in the process. VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports on one Midwestern town that was hoping to change its fortunes by cashing in on the next big U.S. oil boom.
Video

Video Fighting in Sudan's South Kordofan Fuels Mass Displacement

Heavy fighting in Sudan's South Kordofan state is causing hundreds of thousands to flee into uncertain conditions. Local aid organizations estimate as many as 400,000 civilians have been internally displaced since the conflict began more than three years ago, while another 250,000 have fled across the border to refugee camps in South Sudan. VOA's Adam Bailes reports.
Video

Video Lao Dam Project Runs Into Opposition

A Lao dam project on a section of the Mekong River is drawing opposition from local fishermen, international environmental groups and neighboring countries. VOA's Say Mony visited the region to investigate the concerns. Colin Lovett narrates.
Video

Video A Filmmaker Discovers Her Biracial Identity in "Little White Lie

Lacey Schwartz grew up in an upper middle-class Jewish family, in a town in upstate New York where almost everyone she knew was white. She assumed that she was, as well. Her recent documentary, Little White Lie, tells the story of how she uncovered the secret of her true racial background. VOA’s Carolyn Weaver has more on the film.
Video

Video Deep Under Antarctic Ice Sheet, Life!

With the end of summer in the Southern hemisphere, the Antarctic research season is over. Scientists from Northern Illinois University are back in their laboratory after a 3-month expedition on the Ross Ice Shelf, the world’s largest floating ice sheet. As VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports, they hope to find clues to explain the dynamics of the rapidly melting ice and its impact on sea level rise.
Video

Video US-Cuba Normalization Talks Resume Friday

Negotiations aimed at normalizing diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba resume Friday. On the table: lifting a half-century trade embargo and easing banking and travel restrictions. There's opposition in Congress, but some analysts say there may be sufficient political and economic incentives in both nations for a potential breakthrough this year. VOA's Mil Arcega reports.
Video

Video Pakistan's Deadline For SIM Registration Has Cellphone Users Scrambling

Pakistani cell phone users have until midnight Thursday to register their SIM cards, or their service will be cut off. While some privacy experts worry about government intrusion, many Pakistanis are just worried about keeping their phone lines open. VOA Deewa reporter Arshad Muhmand has more from Peshawar.
Video

Video Myanmar Warns Factory Workers to End Strikes

Outside Myanmar's main city Yangon, thousands of workers walked off their jobs earlier this month demanding a doubling of their wages, pay raises after a year and input from labor unions on industrial regulations. Since Friday, the standoff has grown more tense as police moved in to disrupt the sit-ins, resulting in clashes that injured people from both sides. VOA correspondent Steve Herman visited industrial zones which have become a focus of Myanmar's fledgling workers rights movement.
Video

Video Oscar Winners Do More Than Thank the Academy

The Academy Awards presentation is Hollywood’s night to reward the best movies from the previous year. It’s typically a lot of glitter, a lot of thank you’s, a lot of speeches. But many of this year’s speeches carried messages beyond the thank you's. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti takes a look.

All About America

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More