News / Asia

Malaysia Releases Revised Transcript of MH370 Cockpit Communications

  • The Bluefin 21, the Artemis autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), is hoisted back on board the Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield after a successful buoyancy test in the southern Indian Ocean as part of the continuing search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, April 4, 2014.
  • Flight Lieutenant Stephen Graham monitors a TAC station onboard a Royal New Zealand Air Force P3 Orion during search operations for wreckage and debris of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean, near the coast of Western Australia, April 4, 2014.
  • Japan's Maritime Self-Defense Force Commander Hidetsugu Iwamasa speaks to the press in front of one of their P-3C Orion aircraft currently at RAAF Base Pearce near Perth, Australia, April 4, 2014.
  • Relatives of Chinese passengers on board the Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 pray in a prayer room, Beijing, China, April 4, 2014.
  • Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak tour RAAF Base Pearce, near Perth, April 3, 2014.
  • Steve Wang a representative from the committee for relatives of Chinese passengers onboard Flight MH370 talks to journalists after a closed door meeting with Malaysian officials via teleconference in Beijing, April 2, 2014.
  • A crew member sits in the cockpit of a Royal New Zealand Air Force patrol aircraft as it continues searching in the southern Indian Ocean for Flight MH370, April 1, 2014.
  • Koji Kubota of the Japan Coast Guard keeps watch while flying in the search zone for debris from Flight MH370, April 1, 2014.
  • A Buddhist monk welcomes Chinese relatives of passengers on Flight MH370 as they arrive to pray at a Buddhist temple in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, March 31, 2014.
  • Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott addresses the international forces currently based in Perth searching for Flight MH370 during his visit to RAAF Base Pearce, March 31, 2014.
The Search for Flight MH370
Malaysia has released a detailed transcript of the exchanges that took place between the cockpit crew of missing Flight 370 and air traffic controllers. The document reveals a more mundane final sign-off from the jet than authorities had described.

According to the transcript, the final words from the airliner to air traffic controllers were: “Good night, Malaysian three seven zero.”
 
Earlier, Malaysian authorities had said the critical last communication was a more informal and uncharacteristic, "All right, good night."
 
Malaysian officials say they are now uncertain whether the final phrase was uttered by the pilot or co-pilot after previously saying the co-pilot likely made the final transmission. They say the transcript was "initially held as part of the police investigation,” but are giving no other reason for the delay in releasing it.
 
The communications from the plane’s cockpit to ground controllers have been under scrutiny for clues related to the plane’s disappearance. So far, investigators searching the crews’ backgrounds have found nothing to explain the plane’s long, silent flight to a remote part of the Indian Ocean.
 
The Malaysia Airlines flight went missing on March 8 with 239 people onboard.
 
The director general of Malaysia's Civil Aviation Department on Tuesday spoke at the annual conference of the trade association for the world’s airlines, the International Air Transport Association.
 
During his speech in Kuala Lumpur, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman gave details related to the ongoing search operations, but halted his remarks when he heard cameras clicking in the audience.

“The last download of the ACARS was at 1:07 in the morning as it passed through the peninsula of Malaysia. The next download was supposed to be at 1:37, half an hour later. I'm sorry, is there any media here? I don't know there's media here, I'm sorry. Can I ask the media to stay out please.” explained Rahman.
 
Tony Tyler, the director general of the IATA, told delegates he understands global puzzlement about how the airliner could have vanished without finding any physical evidence after more than three weeks of searching.
 
"In a world where our every move seems to be tracked, there is disbelief that an aircraft could simply disappear and that the black box is so difficult to recover. An Air France 447 brought similar issues to light a few years ago, and some progress was made, but that must now be accelerated. We cannot let another aircraft simply disappear," Tyler stated.
 
But time is running out. Authorities say the batteries in the black box will lose power about 30 days after the crash.
 
Andrew Herdman, director general of the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines, says even if the black box is not found before it stops transmitting, the search will likely continue.
 
“I think there will be every effort made to carry on, conduct the search and continue those efforts. The technologies may change but you’ll still feel a commitment to trying to find the wreckage. Not least, of course, we owe it to the families, but it’s wanting to know,” said Herdman.
 
Family members of the flight’s Chinese passengers have directed their anger at Malaysia government officials. China’s government and media have also criticized the handling of the crisis in Kuala Lumpur as clumsy.”
 
The Malaysia authorities say they are doing their best to solve the mystery.
 
A multi-national search currently includes at least ten planes and nine ships in the southern Indian Ocean, about 1,800 kilometers off Australia’s west coast.
 
An Australian military vessel, carrying an underwater drone and a sophisticated American device that can listen for signals from the airplane’s black is now poised to join the search. 
 

Steve Herman

A veteran journalist, Steven L Herman is the Voice of America Asia correspondent.

You May Like

Video VOA Reporter Tours Devastated Peshawar School

Islamist militants wearing military uniforms and strapped with explosives attacked a military run school Tuesday in the northwestern Pakistani city of Peshawar. At least 141 people were killed in the horrific attack, most of them young students. More

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

Dropout rate at an all-time high in South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during 3-year civil war More

Tennessee Songbirds Fly Coop Long Before Tornadoes Arrive

Researchers say birds apparently alerted to danger by sounds at frequencies below range of human hearing More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US: Response to Sony Hack Will Be Proportionali
X
Aru Pande
December 19, 2014 1:45 AM
The White House says President Barack Obama considers the cyberattack on Sony Corp. a serious national security matter and that the U.S. will counter with an "appropriate response." VOA correspondent Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video US: Response to Sony Hack Will Be Proportional

The White House says President Barack Obama considers the cyberattack on Sony Corp. a serious national security matter and that the U.S. will counter with an "appropriate response." VOA correspondent Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

The school dropout rate is at an all-time high in Sudan's South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during the three-year civil war between the government and SPLA-N rebel forces. Adam Bailes visited Sudan's Nuba Mountains' region and reports many children are simply too scared to go to school
Video

Video Nigerians Fleeing Boko Haram Languish in Camp Near Capital

In its five-year effort to impose Islamic law in northeastern Nigeria, the Boko Haram extremist group has killed thousands of people and forced hundreds of thousands to flee. Some of those who ran for their lives now live in squalor on the edges of the capital, Abuja. Chris Stein reports for VOA.
Video

Video Putin Says Russian Economy Will Emerge Stronger

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said his country's sinking economy will not only recover but also become stronger, despite falling oil prices and Western sanctions over Ukraine. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports.
Video

Video Detained Turkish Journalists Follow Teachings of US-Based Preacher

The Turkish government’s jailing of critical journalists has sparked international condemnation and is being seen as an effort to undermine the followers of an ailing Turkish preacher based in the United States. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky has more.
Video

Video ‘Anti-Islamization’ Marches Increase Tensions In Germany

Anti-immigrant rallies in Germany have been building in recent weeks, peaking Monday night in the city of Dresden where tens of thousands of people turned out to demonstrate against what they call the ‘Islamization’ of the West. Germany has offered asylum to more Syrian refugees than any other country, and this appears to have set off the protests. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.
Video

Video Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countries

Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.

All About America

AppleAndroid