News / Middle East

    Syrian Cease-Fire in Effect, Some Violence Reported

    A Syrian rebel fighter from the Failaq al-Rahman brigade mans a position on the frontline against regime forces in the town of Arbin in the eastern Ghouta region on the outskirts of the capital Damascus, Feb. 26, 2016.
    A Syrian rebel fighter from the Failaq al-Rahman brigade mans a position on the frontline against regime forces in the town of Arbin in the eastern Ghouta region on the outskirts of the capital Damascus, Feb. 26, 2016.
    Margaret Besheer

    The cease-fire in Syria that began Saturday has mostly held, but there have been some incidents of violence.

    State media report a car bomb explosion on the outskirts of the central city of Salamiyeh in Hama province killed two soldiers.  No one has claimed responsibility for the blast near the town's entrance.

    Elsewhere, clashes between government forces and rebel groups were reported in Latakia province near the Turkish border.  

    The truce, brokered by the United States and Russia, took effect at midnight Friday Damascus time (2200 UTC). The Syrian opposition’s umbrella group, the High Negotiations Committee, said in a statement that 97 groups have promised to take part in the cease-fire.

    The truce does not apply to Islamic State and the al-Qaida-linked al-Nusra Front terror groups.

    Less than an hour before the temporary truce went into effect, members of the U.N. Security council unanimously endorsed the deal in New York.

    At the same meeting, U.N. Syria envoy Staffan de Mistura announced that if the truce largely holds and humanitarian aid access continues, he will reconvene intra-Syrian peace talks March 7 in Geneva.

    "Saturday will be critical," de Mistura told the council via a video link from Geneva. "No doubt there will be no shortage of attempts to undermine this process. We are ready for it — we should not be impressed, we should not be overly concerned."

    A mother mourns for her son, Suleyman Uslu, killed in fighting the Islamic State in north Syria, at a cemetery in Diyarbakir, Turkey, Feb. 25, 2016. He was part of the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia, which the U.S. backs in fighting IS.
    A mother mourns for her son, Suleyman Uslu, killed in fighting the Islamic State in north Syria, at a cemetery in Diyarbakir, Turkey, Feb. 25, 2016. He was part of the Syrian Kurdish YPG militia, which the U.S. backs in fighting IS.

    He said after the meeting that a report he received at three minutes after midnight Damascus time indicated that both Darayya and Damascus had calmed down.

    The cessation of hostilities will apply to all of Syria, except for areas where the so-called Islamic State and another armed group, Jabat al-Nusra, operate, as well as terrorist groups already designated by the Security Council.

    The co-chairs of the International Support Group for Syria (ISSG) — Russia and the United States — will be responsible for addressing violations, not the U.N.

    U.S. President Barack Obama said the United States will do everything it can to make the agreement hold.

    Friday, U.S. State Department spokesman Mark Toner said the United States has received assurances from Russia that it would not launch strikes against the "moderate opposition" in Syria after the truce takes effect. He said it is "put up or shut up time" for Russia to show whether it is serious about stopping the fighting.

    Russian bombing

    Before the cease-fire took effect, Russian warplanes Friday continued bombing what the Kremlin calls "terrorist organizations." Russian President Vladimir Putin told reporters Friday that Russia plans to continue its bombing campaign against Islamic State and the al-Nusra Front.

    Several security council members expressed concern that the aerial bombardments increased in the lead-up to the midnight truce. They also expressed skepticism about their continuation.

    "It is hard to seem serious and sincere about ceasing hostilities when you ramp up fighting right up to the minute the cessation of hostilities is to take effect," said U.S. United Nations Ambassador Samantha Power.

    France's ambassador, François Delattre, called the intensification of bombardments "a bad omen."

    Russia's deputy foreign minister, Gennady Gatilov, who is in New York, said at the meeting that Russia would continue to combat terrorists because Syria could not be stable until their threat was eliminated.

    Support for talks

    All council members stressed the importance of a cessation of hostilities leading to meaningful political talks.

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, shown at a Feb. 16 meeting in Germany, have pressed for the cease-fire.
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, shown at a Feb. 16 meeting in Germany, have pressed for the cease-fire.

    "If we can make this cessation of hostilities hold — which is a very big if — we will take a genuine step toward that political solution we have talked about for so long," Power said.

    Proximity talks convened that Jan. 29 in Geneva fell apart nearly immediately. De Mistura called on the Security Council and members of the ISSG to "ensure that the parties come to Geneva again. Ready this time to engage and stay, and stay engaged on the substantive issues."

    De Mistura told reporters in Geneva after his briefing to the council that he expects the next round of intra-Syrian talks to last at least three weeks. The previous round of talks collapsed after three days.

    Lavrov disdains 'Plan B'

    On Friday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov hosted a meeting in Moscow of the Russian-Arab Cooperation forum, where he pledged that the gathering would focus on ending the conflict in Syria.

    Lavrov also said the cease-fire's success depended in part on the U.S.-led coalition refraining from talking about "some sort of Plan B, about preparing a ground operation, about the creation of some sort of useless buffer zone," AFP reported.

    If Russia and the Syrian government don't respect the cease-fire agreement, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has warned that Washington would consider a "Plan B."

    Lavrov voiced concern that Syria's main opposition group said it would honor the cease-fire only for two weeks.

    "The Russian-American initiative does not foresee any preliminary conditions and qualifications," AFP quoted Lavrov as saying. The Russian official also criticized Obama for again saying Thursday that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad should step down to ensure a lasting peace.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Mark from: Virginia
    February 27, 2016 5:43 PM
    Oh, how things have gone from bad to worse around the world these days....

    Growing up, we only had a handful of terrible things to worry about; nuclear attack by the Soviets (the Cold War was in full swing back then), the odd hostage crisis or hijacking, the Vietnam War, getting Israel and the PLO to talk and be nice with each other, an occasional assassination somewhere, an epidemic crime spree in American cities (serial killers by the dozens), inflation, oil crisis, Watergate and blatant racial prejudice from both sides of the racial fence. Disco was the worst of all (sorry, I jest, but it was pretty bad).
    I remember air raid drills in Elementary school, a bomb scare or two thrown in for good measure. Alcohol and marijuana were society's glaring curse (acid and heroin were making headway, but not headlines). Herpes and syphilis the plague of the sexually promiscuous, followed by AIDS a short while later. Oh, and Africa was in a seemingly never-ending famine.

    In comparison to today's troubles, all that from yesteryear seems almost...trivial....

    by: Igor from: Russia
    February 27, 2016 4:10 AM
    Western leaders must stop supporting Turkey and Saudi Arabia sponsored terrorist groups (disguised as moderate sunni islamist rebels) because those terrorists will behead European citizens when they gain power. It is certain because Syrian rebels onced ate organs of a syrian soldier killed by them.

    by: Haron from: Afghanistan
    February 26, 2016 1:31 PM
    I would like to say unfortunately, that insurgents will bite Turkey and Saudi Arabia and these two countries are the snakes that might bite USA one day. then on that time a new page of tensions will rise between USA, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. this stage of cooperation is emotionally. when Turkey or Saudi Arabia bite USA then it'll be difficult to harness the circumstances So, I urge US to not support/nourish Saudi Arabia or Turkey.

    by: Anonymous
    February 26, 2016 12:07 PM
    A guide on who is who in Syria:
    The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights: A Single Sunni refugee in London, biased against the Syrian Government.
    FSA, Nusra Front, Turkmen Brigades: b.s names, used by the western media to avoid using AQ, since all these groups are AQ.
    AQ in Syria is also called "moderate rebels", "opposition".
    The AQ (opposition) in the negotiations table, is misleadingly called High Negotiations Committee (HNC), where in fact it is a collection of AQ groups supported by Saudi Arabia and Turkey.
    The Kurds are not invited to negotiations, because Turkey opposed the Kurds presence in the negotiations.
    The Syrian Government, Russia, Iran, Hezbollah and The Kurds: Fighting ISIS and AQ, not just ISIS, but ISIS and AQ (above-mentioned groups).
    Saudi Arabia and Turkey: support ISIS and AQ (the above-mentioned AQ groups and several more).
    The west, NATO and especially Britain and part of the US including presidential candidate Clinton: support Saudi Arabia and Turkey.
    AQ in Syria are mostly foreign Chechens, Uzbeks, Tajiks, Tunisians, Saudis and Turks, imported by Turkey via Turkey into Syria.
    In Response

    by: John
    February 26, 2016 9:03 PM
    Since I have no interest or stake in what the various parties to the conflict think they're all fighting over, I'd naturally be happy if they all kissed and made up. I'm not holding my breath waiting for it to happen, though.
    In Response

    by: meanbill from: USA
    February 26, 2016 6:43 PM
    There are (only 2 sides) in any war, no matter how many allies each side has on their side? .. The one side has the US and NATO and the Sunni Muslim countries, kingdoms and emirates and the Sunni Muslim terrorist/rebels supporting them, while the other side has the Syrian government and the Russians and the Shia Muslim Iran and Hezbollah fighters supporting them?

    Since the US and Russians are the only major powers, they will do all the negotiating for their allies, and negotiate if the war should continue on or end? .. The US and Russian allies may not like the negotiated results, but they can't continue on with the war by themselves, no matter what the propagandists say? .. The US can and will control all their allies no matter what the US and their allies say, because they can stop them from getting weapons and supplies, while the Russians proved they control their allies? .. The US and Russia will decide if the war goes on or ends?

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