News / Middle East

Egyptian Army Issues Ultimatum

In this photo released by the Egyptian Presidency, July 1, 2013, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, right, meets with Prime Minister Hesham Kandil, center, and Egyptian Minister of Defense, Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, left in Cairo.
In this photo released by the Egyptian Presidency, July 1, 2013, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, right, meets with Prime Minister Hesham Kandil, center, and Egyptian Minister of Defense, Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, left in Cairo.
VOA News
The Egyptian military is giving President Mohamed Morsi and opposition leaders 48 hours to settle their differences and agree on a path forward. If they don’t, according to the military, it will issue its own plan for Egypt’s future.

The ultimatum was delivered Monday by Defense Minister General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi after several days of massive nationwide protests and violence that has left at least 16 people dead.

Al-Sisi’s warning came after anti-Morsi protesters ransacked the Cairo headquarters of the president’s Muslim Brotherhood movement.  

Witnesses said the protesters smashed windows and tossed firebombs into the Brotherhood building. Amateur video showed Brotherhood supporters on the roof of the building firing at protesters below. Officials said at least five people were killed.

Watch: related video footage

Egyptian Protesters Ransack Muslim Brotherhood Officesi
X
July 01, 2013 1:10 PM
Protesters in Egypt have stormed and ransacked the Cairo headquarters of President Mohamed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood.

Brotherhood spokesman Gehad el Haddad accused Egypt's national police force of not responding to pleas to intervene when the group’s headquarters building came under attack. Haddad also warned that the Brotherhood would consider setting up an armed militia to defend its party offices.

The military’s ultimatum also came after anti-government demonstrations throughout Egypt on Sunday that were the largest since the 2011 revolution that swept former president Hosni Mubarak from power.  Arabic-language media quoted the Interior Ministry saying the crowds in Cairo and other cities across Egypt totaled as many as 3 million people.

The demonstrations were organized in part by the recently-formed opposition "Tamarrod" movement, which is demanding that Morsi step down by Tuesday. Morsi told Britain's Guardian newspaper Sunday that he was legitimately elected and would not resign.

Veteran opposition editor and publisher Hisham Kassem says Morsi is finding himself increasingly isolated as most branches of the government have deserted him.
 
"While [former President] Mubarak had all the forces, all the pillars of the state at least neutral, if not supporting him, Morsi has nothing," Kassem said. "He doesn't have the foreign office; he doesn't have the judiciary; he doesn't have the military, the police force, or the media."

Kassem also pointed out that the Egyptian national police force, which had been widely discredited for siding with the Mubarak regime against protesters in 2011, has suddenly gained new favor with the public, "by siding with the people, this time around."

Egyptian police officers chanted slogans against Morsi at the funeral for a top commander killed in an attack in the Sinai, last week. Several officers recently accused the Muslim Brotherhood of colluding with militants in the Sinai.


Edward Yeranian in Cairo also contributed to this report

  • A protester, opposing Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi, sits next to graffiti depicting Morsi on a wall in Cairo July 2, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi march in formation with sticks and protective gear outside of the Rabia el-Adawiya mosque near the presidential palace, July 2, 2013.
  • Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans and flash laser lights during a demonstration in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, July 2, 2013.
  • Sayed Saafan, 57, right, an Egyptian supporter of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, holds a stick and wears protective gear during training outside of the Rabia el-Adawiya mosque near the presidential palace, July 2, 2013.
  • Egyptian supporters of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi read newspapers under his poster at their camp outside of the Rabia el-Adawiya mosque near the presidential palace, July 2, 2013.
  • Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi guard the entrance of the presidential palace, July 2, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi attend a rally in Nasser City, Cairo, Egypt, July 1, 2013.
  • A protester holds an Egyptian national flag as he and others attack the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters in the Muqattam district in Cairo, July 1, 2013.
  • A protester waves a flag as Egyptians gather in Tahrir Square during a demonstration against President Mohamed Morsi in Cairo, June 30, 2013.
  • A looter gestures as part of an air-conditioning is thrown down from the Muslim Brotherhood's headquarters after it was burned down by protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi in Cairo's Moqattam district, July 1, 2013.
  • A protester opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi wears a defaced poster of Morsi as a mask in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, June 30, 2013.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: DORAI RAJ L from: Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu.
July 01, 2013 9:53 PM
I think, Cleopatra should return to solve this issue.


by: JR from: Brasil
July 01, 2013 2:55 PM
That's a so core problem that we can say nothing at all. The egyptcians have to find their own ways by themselves, that's all.


by: Michael from: USA
July 01, 2013 7:27 AM
Morsi might be too late to change his policy. What policy? The policy of the past months. The protestors object to that policy, but they are not simply calling for a change in policy. Anyhow, policy would not be followed under any plea to do so


by: ali baba from: new york
July 01, 2013 5:36 AM
Egypt is dead It is dead since Mubarak leave the power. The economy is reach to point of no return .Muslim brotherhood and radical Hamas started revolution that drag the country downhill .Tthe time to fix the problem is over, the damage is beyond repair. united state policy maker has done terrible mistake to support Muslim brotherhood and giving them 1.5 billion of military equipment which will be in the wrong hand of terrorist Islam is not the solution..Islam is prescription of disaster

In Response

by: Mark Marky from: Brasil
July 01, 2013 10:14 PM
Egypt was much better off under the former dictator than it will ever be under islamic extremists like the "brotherhood," who are totalitarian, murderous, hateful, and violent persecutors of anyone who dares to be different or diagree with them. Pity the poor Copts! The same will be true of Syria where the "rebels" are killing Christians and minorities. Wherever islam holds sway there is total disregard for human rights.

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