News / Europe

Optimism Over Euro Crisis Eases Market Pressure

Euro Crisis Anxiety Eases, for Nowi
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Henry Ridgwell
September 15, 2012 1:01 PM
Eurozone finance ministers met in Cyprus to discuss the euro crisis Friday, under less pressure from international markets than usual. Spain’s borrowing costs fell this week, while election results from the Netherlands were resoundingly pro-EU. But in the epicenter of the crisis --- Greec -- there are few signs of an end to economic and social misery. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

Euro Crisis Anxiety Eases, for Now

Henry Ridgwell
Eurozone finance ministers had a spring in their step Friday as they gathered in Cyprus for talks on the debt crisis as market pressure eases on the single currency.

Spain - whose debt threatens the whole currency union - saw its 10-year borrowing costs drop from a dangerously high 7.64 percent in July to around 5.5 percent following the European Central Bank’s announcement that it could buy unlimited Spanish bonds, should it apply for a bailout.

Spain’s finance minister Luis De Guindos gave little away when asked if he would ask for a bailout.

He said that in the next couple of days Spain will make important announcements. What Spain needs, he said, is to adjust its public deficit to the level they are committed to.

But there are plenty of pitfalls still ahead, said Simon Tilford, chief economist at the analyst group the Centre for European Reform.

“The ECB is certainly doing all it can given the political constraints. But it needs to be remembered that the bond purchases will be conditional on countries signing up to bailout programs, programs of structural adjustment," he said.

Another obstacle was overcome this week with the German constitutional court’s approval of the eurozone’s permanent bailout fund worth nearly $650 billion - the European Stability Mechanism.

The building blocks are starting to fall into place,Tilford said.

“But even that could be over-egging it. ECB action is necessary but so is a proper Eurozone banking union, so is some form of debt mutualization,” he said.

And, Tilford added, the Germans are still reluctant to take on the debt of southern Europe.

With confidence in the entire European Union project shaken to its core by the crisis, there was relief from the Netherlands where voters gave pro-EU parties a sweeping victory, said Andre Krouwel, an associate professor at Vu University in Amsterdam.
 
“People know the Dutch cannot survive outside the European framework. It is a large economy but it’s not an internal market, we’re an export country,” he said.

But there is still little optimism in the eye of the debt storm - Greece. EU and International Monetary Fund  officials - the ‘troika’ - are in Athens to persuade Greece to stick to the timetable of spending cuts. Junior coalition leaders are resisting.

Fotis Kouvelis is leader of the Democratic Left party. Kouvelis said the troika and European partners must understand that no measure can be imposed on a society which is disintegrating.

The EU-IMF report on Greece is due out next month and there are fears the country has fallen further behind in its austerity program. The current market optimism could evaporate rapidly if that report makes grim reading, analysts say.

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Comments
     
by: Rob Swift from: United Kingdom
September 17, 2012 4:25 PM
The British government is in a state of panic, with the value of the british pound against the euro being manipulated down daily. Industry here is crippled by exhorbitant road fuel prices being manipulated up by the government. Today a litre of diesel road fuel is 1.46 pounds a litre in Britain compared with 1.08 pounds a litre (equivalent) in France. This is a recipe for national disaster.


by: Samuel Claudius from: New York NY
September 16, 2012 6:32 PM
If you want a strong curency and a Unidet Europe,Europeans they should stop bashing the curency and they should keep their savings in EURO curency and not run to the banks to exchange the curency for Swiss franc or USD dollar because of the fears the EU curency collapse,they should spend more in EURO products,and as destination European spots as holydays,Europeans they should stop to be so conservative and sometimes nationalist and be all Unidet and accept the sacrices when they are imposed,a good lifestyle always come with sacrifices,If europe can imagine can exist without Greece they mistaken,The whole world know the Greece is the heart of civilization that influence a lot of the balance civilization system around the world,France should stop discriminate to gypsy nomads people and other nationalities and be more responsable behave like Euopean partner not like macho power that many times not consult European Union when they take decisions that can affect the European democracy.

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