News / Asia

India-Pakistan Clash Unlikely to Affect Long-Term Relations

Border Security Force soldiers patrol the India-Pakistan border at Kanachak, about 15 kilometers (9 miles) west of Jammu, India. (file photo)
Border Security Force soldiers patrol the India-Pakistan border at Kanachak, about 15 kilometers (9 miles) west of Jammu, India. (file photo)
Ayaz Gul
Pakistan is accusing India of a cross-border raid in the disputed Kashmir territory, killing at least one Pakistani soldier and critically wounding another.  But Indian officials say their troops fired across the border after being attacked from Pakistan. The incident is unlikely to seriously affect the peace process that has dramatically improved diplomatic ties.

Army officials in Pakistan say Indian troops crossed the disputed Kashmir border known as the "Line of Control" early Sunday and "physically raided" a Pakistani military outpost in the Bagh region.  They say Indian troops withdrew after an exchange of gunfire. 

Indian military officials dismissed the Pakistani claims as "baseless," saying their troops only returned fire from across the border.

India and Pakistan have accused each other of several violations of a cease-fire in Kashmir announced in 2003. 

But the two nuclear-armed neighbors have taken significant steps in recent months toward normalizing trade, cultural, sports and political ties.  Last month, India and Pakistan signed a landmark deal to relax some visa restrictions to facilitate cross-border travel.

Pakistan and India have fought three wars and the Pakistani military has trained and equipped itself to be ready for another conflict.

But the military is reported to have redefined that doctrine recently because it has been engaged in fighting domestic and foreign terrorist networks like al-Qaida and the Pakistani Taliban, which are entrenched in the northwestern tribal region bordering Afghanistan.

Speaking to VOA, Pakistani Information Minister Qamar Zaman Kaira says improved ties with India have reduced the external threat to his country. 

"Yes, we had a very difficult time with India.  We have [fought] three wars," he said. "Our forces were determined and they were cautious of the Indian threat.  That threat is not over.  Of course still it is there.  But now the internal threat has taken over.  It is a greater threat of course now.  Pakistan is the biggest victim of this terrorism or extremism."

Pakistan is an ally of the United States in its war on terrorism and Pakistani officials say their country has suffered unprecedented losses during the past decade in that fight. 

But allegations the Pakistani military harbors extremist groups who attack government and coalition forces in Afghanistan remain a major source of diplomatic tensions between Islamabad and Washington.

Speaking to reporters Saturday, U.S. Embassy deputy chief Richard Hoagland said the United States appreciates Pakistan's stepped up anti-terror efforts

"Any way that Pakistan and the United States can recognize together the dangers of terrorism and extremism, can find productive and appropriate ways to work together, that is for everyone’s benefit and we appreciate that," he said.
 
Pakistan’s reluctance to uproot alleged bases of Afghan insurgents has prompted the United States to attack suspected militant targets using unmanned aircraft or drones.

The latest suspected U.S. drone attack took place on Sunday in the South Waziristan tribal district, killing more than a dozen alleged militants.  Wednesday, top Pakistani militant leader Mullah Nazir was killed by a drone attack on his hideout in the same region.

The anti-U.S. warlord’s fighters were allegedly involved in fueling the Taliban insurgency across the border in Afghanistan.

You May Like

Pundits Split Over Long-Term US Role in Afghanistan

Security pact remains condition for American presence beyond 2014; deadline criticized More

US Eyes Islamic State Threat

Officials warn that IS could pose a threat to US homeland More

Video Ukraine: Captured Troops Proof of Russian Role in Separatist Fight

Moscow says Russian troops crossed into Ukrainian territory by mistake More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Singh from: London
January 07, 2013 9:09 AM
LOC is disputed territory occupied by 7 million Indian troops since 1947. LOC is not international border. Both Pakistan and India, whenever get a chance, cross the LOC and capture the post. Simple is that !!!


by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
January 06, 2013 8:28 PM
It is good to see that India is no longer taking any chances with its security issues. After the henious Mumbai attack, by Pak originating terrorists, it would be very sad to see another such terrible incident. For some time the Pak gvmt is having serious difficulties controlling the deteriorating terrorist situation. The Pak population endures almost daily deadly attacks. I am not sure what is the purpose or use of the Pak forces, which has one of the largest militaries in the world. These forces sustain enourmous loses, each time they engage the Taliban or other local terror orgs; it almost looks like, the terrorist are far better trained and far better equipped than the Pak forces, but we know that is not the case, given the massive US/Ch help. The Pak soldier seems to be very dedicated/courageous, they stand their ground and die in large numbers; the problem must certainly be up the chain of command? If I had a business, the way the Pak outcomes on security issues is, I would fire all the managers, up to the CEO; maybe just contract out the whole issue. Poor civilians in Pak, top heavy costly military, and no security or safety.


by: Antony from: USA
January 06, 2013 12:13 PM
It is interesting that India has embolden its stance in fighting terrorism by sending troops to the other side of the line of control (LOC). We see this same thing on the Afghanistan side. I wonder what is happening to Pakistan! Who is really in charge? Why is their military so much in bed with the militants and pushing these militants to Afghanistan or India through their western and eastern borders?

In Response

by: Puneet from: New Delhi
January 07, 2013 3:35 AM
Pls be advised that once Indian Army cross the border it will stop at Lahor or border of AF. It was Pakistan Army who is playing diverting tactics by opening fire to Indian fronts, as there was ceasefire in LOC for the last 03 years or so,also this is old way to inflitrate. My heart goes out for people of Pakistan whose constant desire of democracy is being crushed by Army and militant. It is time they listen to their own people else Pak will be decimated by their own people.. anyway it a failed state.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Scientists Unlock Mystery of Bird Flocksi
X
George Putic
August 25, 2014 4:00 PM
How can flocks of birds, schools of fish or herds of antelope suddenly change direction -- all the individuals adjusting their movement in concert, at seemingly the same time? British researchers now have some insights into this behavior, which has puzzled scientists for a long time. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video Scientists Unlock Mystery of Bird Flocks

How can flocks of birds, schools of fish or herds of antelope suddenly change direction -- all the individuals adjusting their movement in concert, at seemingly the same time? British researchers now have some insights into this behavior, which has puzzled scientists for a long time. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video Ukraine: Captured Troops Proof of Russian Role in Separatist Fight

Ukrainian officials say they have captured Russian soldiers on Ukrainian territory -- the latest accusation of Moscow's involvement in the conflict in eastern Ukraine. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the Ukrainian side of the battle, where soldiers are convinced of Russia's role.
Video

Video Rubber May Soon Come From Dandelions

Synthetic rubber has been around for more than a century, but quality tires for cars, trucks and aircraft still need up to 40 percent or more natural rubber content. As the source of natural rubber, the rubber tree, is prone to disease and can be affected by bad weather. So scientists are looking for replacements. And as VOA’s George Putic reports, they may have found one in a ubiquitous weed.
Video

Video Jewish Life in Argentina Reflected in Yiddish Tango

Jewish people from across Europe and Russia have been immigrating to Argentina for hundreds of years. They brought with them dance music that were eventually mixed with Argentine tango. The result is Yiddish tango -- a fusion of melodies and cultural experiences that is still evolving today. Elizabeth Lee reports from the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, where one band is bringing Yiddish tango to an American audience.
Video

Video Peace Returns to Ferguson as Community Tries to Heal

Thousands of people nationwide are expected to attend funeral services Monday in the U.S. Midwestern city of St. Louis, Missouri, for Michael Brown, the unarmed African-American teenager who was fatally shot by a white police officer August 9 in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. The shooting touched off days of violent demonstrations there, resulting in more than 100 arrests. VOA's Chris Simkins reports from Ferguson where the community is trying to move on after weeks of racial tension.
Video

Video Meeting in Minsk May Hinge on Putin Story

The presidents of Russia and Ukraine are expected to meet face-to-face Tuesday in Minsk, along with European leaders, for talks on the situation in Ukraine. Political analysts say the much welcomed dialogue could help bring an end to months of deadly clashes between pro-Russia separatists and Ukrainian forces in the country's southeast. But much depends on the actions of one man, Russian President Vladimir Putin. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
Video

Video Artists Shun Russia's Profanity Law

Russia in July enacted a law threatening fines for publicly displayed profanity in media, films, literature, music and theater. The restriction, the toughest since the Soviet era, aims to protect the Russian language and culture and has been welcomed by those who say cursing is getting out of control. But many artists reject the move as a patronizing and ineffective act of censorship in line with a string of conservative morality laws. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
Video

Video British Fighters on Frontline of ISIS Information War

Security services are racing to identify the Islamic State militant who beheaded U.S. journalist James Foley in Syria. The murderer spoke English on camera with a British accent. It’s estimated that several hundred British citizens are fighting for the Islamic State, also called ISIL or ISIS, alongside thousands of other foreign jihadists. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from the center of the investigation in London.

AppleAndroid