News / Asia

Pakistan-Taliban Clash Spills into Afghanistan

FILE - Pakistani Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid, center, flanked by bodyguards, talks to reporters at undisclosed location, Pakistani tribal area of Waziristan, Oct. 5, 2013.
FILE - Pakistani Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid, center, flanked by bodyguards, talks to reporters at undisclosed location, Pakistani tribal area of Waziristan, Oct. 5, 2013.
Sharon Behn
Pakistan’s military clashes with Taliban militants have spilled over its northwest border into neighboring Afghanistan. The cross-border skirmish has left civilians, militants and military forces dead across the rugged frontier dividing the two countries.
 
Pakistani military sources say its forces repulsed a major militant attack Saturday morning, killing 16 terrorists in the fighting. One soldier also died and two others were injured.

 
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Tribal area
Tribal area
​The sources said between 150 and 200 Taliban militants from Afghanistan’s Kunar province swarmed over the border in a pre-dawn strike and attacked a group of Pakistani military border posts at Nao Top, in Pakistan’s northwest Bajur tribal district.
 
Bajur is directly across from Afghanistan’s Kunar province.
 
The Pakistani military sources said in the fierce fighting that followed, helicopter gunships were sent in.
 
But Shuja ul-Mulk Jalala, governor of Afghanistan’s Kunar province, said the gunships crossed into Afghan territory. He said four civilians were killed in the firing.

He says, the bombardment began this morning around 7:45 in the Rega area of Dangam district in Kunar province, and continued until 10:30 am. He says four civilians were killed and 10 others were wounded in the bombing.
 
Pakistan did not comment on whether its forces had crossed the border. Pakistani Taliban militants often take refuge inside Afghanistan.
 
Cross border militant attacks have led to significant tension between the neighboring countries, and emotions were high in Kabul’s parliament Saturday.
 
Afghan Defense Minister General Bismillah Khan Mohammadi told his country’s lawmakers that the army was ready to retaliate, but would not make a move without being ordered by Kabul’s civilian government.
 
Mohammadi said President Hamid Karzai had called him to ask for details on the helicopter strikes.  

He says, there is no doubt that last night the Taliban attacked Pakistani army posts. It was the Pakistani Taliban on the border with Dangam.

It was not possible to independently confirm any of the statements due to the remoteness and inaccessibility of the area.
 
The minister said President Karzai had ordered the Afghan military to retaliate if the attacks inside the Afghan border continued.
 
On Wednesday, Kabul summoned Pakistan’s ambassador to Afghanistan to lodge a strong protest over rocket and artillery fire from the Pakistani side.
 
Islamabad has denied it is shelling civilian Afghan areas, and says its forces only hit locations that are launching attacks against Pakistani forces.
 
In a separate incident, some 12 Afghan civilians died in twin roadside bombings in central-eastern Ghazni province.   

Ayaz Gul contributed to this report from Islamabad.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: musthafa from: karachi
June 07, 2014 12:56 AM
Karzai take it easy. Its your brother

by: Asfandyar from: D.I.Khan
June 05, 2014 11:47 AM
Pakistan need to keep destroying these safe havens in Afghanistan and send a ssg unit to capture or kill fazlullah in kunar

by: Asad Khurshid from: Islamabad
June 02, 2014 4:56 AM
Under the new military leadership hot persuit inside Afghanistan is being discussed. These TTP khawarjis supported by Afghan Military aka Northern Alliance (Payed goons of India) with a puppet President Hamid Karzai are sadly mistaken. Pakistan has the right of self defence. Now the attacks coming from Afganistan as they normally do will not only be repulsed but will be persued across the border.
In Response

by: Jano from: Kabul
June 02, 2014 9:47 PM
Asad first u need to no who are Taliban and where did the cam from then talk Taliban are the creation of paki CIA if u listen to ur ex president benazir be4 she com to Pakistan she give interwive to bbc she said I made the Taliban cuz my dream was to put a dirty paki flag in jalalabad but her dream never cam true so don't blame afghan there is no Taliban they are all paki terrorist

by: Bashy Quraishy from: Copenhagen
June 01, 2014 10:29 PM
It is very strange that Taliban from Afghanistan attack Pakistani people and run to hide there but if Pak forces chase them across the border, a hue and cry follows.
The best solution would be for both countries to join forces and crush the Taliban movement once and for all. The problem is that some people do not want to do that.

They have an agenda to make trouble for Pakistan, which of course has the right to retaliate.

So choose your side carefully, dear Afghanistan.

by: Khan from: Peshawar
June 01, 2014 8:20 AM
The real miscreants are in Afghan government and in Afghan intelligence in collusion with the Indians.

Pakistan has the right to self defence.

The fundamental question is why we're 200 armed terrorists allowed to cross over from Afghanistan. Where is the Afghan army? Why is Fazlullah the khwareej an Indian agent given sanctuary in Afghanistan.

Pakistan must continue protecting its border gunships air strikes and if Afghan Army attempt any adventurism you must be blunt and not dilly dally and respond in kind.

If the Indians are embedded into this pathetic afghan government then Pakistan must be prepared to face hear attacks but importantly respond in ferocity.

Seal the border - end off.

Pashtuns are our brothers but Fazlullah recruits Central Asians and others on Indian money capitalising the differences between our brothers in the Panshjeer valley.

How long can brothers stay divided by the miscreants from the Ganges river.

Pakistan can no longer tolerate attacks from Afghan Terrorists who rather than fight occupation focus on Pakistan.

They are nothing but a proxy and need to be responded to in kind. By and large the genuine misguided elements of the TTP are waking up to Fazlullah and his Indian agenda.
In Response

by: Jano from: Kabul
June 02, 2014 9:57 PM
My dear brother mr khan
Do u really believe the Taliban cross the border from Afghanistan first plz think where did Taliban cam from and who made them it's all paki CIA paki CIA Hamed gull or wateve is has name he said it him self the we made the Taliban and ur ex president benazir be4 she com to Pakistan she said to BBC the I made the Taliban and I send them to Afghanistan wat eve is happening now wit us pashtons it's all cuz of Pakistan in Afghanistan only pashtons dying in Pakistan only pashton dying there is no Taliban they are all paki CIA my brother

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