News / Asia

Protest Leader Calls for 'Peaceful Revolution' in Pakistan

Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran religious organisation Muhammad Tahirul Qadri addresses his supporters from behind the window of an armored vehicle on the second day of protests in Islamabad, January 15, 2013.
Sufi cleric and leader of the Minhaj-ul-Quran religious organisation Muhammad Tahirul Qadri addresses his supporters from behind the window of an armored vehicle on the second day of protests in Islamabad, January 15, 2013.
Sharon Behn
Populist Pakistani cleric Tahir-ul Qadri has called for a peaceful revolution in the country and the dissolution of the current government.  His comments came as tens of thousands of demonstrators held a second day of protests in the capital, Islamabad, and the nation's Supreme Court ordered the arrest of Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf. 

Army helicopters on Tuesday flew overhead as tens of thousands of flag-waving supporters took over the capital's streets for second day, demanding a radical change to Pakistan's political system.

Protest leader, Tahirul Qadri, a Canadian-Pakistani Sufi cleric who burst onto the political scene last month, says the government is dysfunctional and has lost its legitimacy. He called for the dissolution of parliament.

"We are here in front of parliament house just to save our country from collapse and from complete ruin," he said. "We need substantial changes, reforms in our democratic, political and electoral system."

The firebrand Sufi cleric slammed corrupt lawmakers, calling them looters and thieves. Speaking from inside a bullet-poof truck, Qadri said the march was a democratic and constitutional way of restoring transparency and law and order to the country.

"And, just this democratic change, and political and electoral reforms is our revolution.  This is green revolution.  This is peaceful revolution.  This is democratic revolution.  This is constitutional revolution.  This is lawful revolution," he said.

  • Supporters of Tahir-ul Qadri gather during their fourth day of protest in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Tahir-ul Qadri listen to him while standing in the rain during the fourth day of protest in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 17, 2013.
  • A supporter of Tahir-ul Qadri waves a Pakistani flag as he walks on a container on the third day of protests in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 16, 2013.
  • Supporters of Tahir-ul Qadri wait for him on the third day of protests in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 16, 2013.
  • Thousands of supporters of Tahir-ul-Qadri participate in an anti-government rally in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 16, 2013.
  • A supporter of cleric Tahir-ul-Qadri enters her tent carrying an image of him, while she and others camp near the parliament, during an anti-government rally in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 16, 2013.
  • Supporters of Tahir-ul Qadri call for democracy during a protest in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 15, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A supporters of cleric Tahir-ul Qadri, center, places a sticker on his forehead bearing the image of Tahir-ul-Qadri, during a rally in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 15, 2013.
  • Supporters of Tahir-ul Qadri take part in a protest in Islamabad, Pakistan, January 14, 2013.
  • Female police officers stand guard ahead of a protest called by cleric Tahir-ul Qadri, Islamabad, Pakistan, January 14, 2013.

Speaking in Urdu to the gathering, Qadri vowed the crowds occupying the main avenue of Islamabad will not return to their homes until the government responds to their demands.

As Qadri concluded his speech, which praised both the military and judiciary, the supreme court ordered the arrest of Pakistan's Prime Minister Raja Perez Ashraf on an outstanding court case.

An enormous cheer went up from the crowd on hearing the news.

Qadri has effectively tapped into many Pakistanis' deep frustration with the government because of repeated energy shortages, corruption and unemployment. Supporter Ahsan Gilani says, if Qadri asks his followers to take their protest to parliament, they will.

"If he will say go, we are ready.  We are ready.  We don't worry - no fear from the bullets, guns, helicopters are coming, we have no fear, so we can do, we are ready," he said.

Qadri also addressed the thousands of security personnel protecting the capital, telling them not to listen to the government and use force against the crowds - but instead to protect the protestors.

He also is calling for more people to join the rally in the capital city that is already on high alert.

Analyst Raza Rumi, policy director of the Jinnah Institute, says the Qadri's attempt to force a dismissal of the government is potentially destabilizing.

"[There are] Many in Pakistan, and other cities and political parties, who think this is definitely not the right way forward for Pakistan, as we cannot afford this situation to escalate," said Rumi. "I think it will be very important for the government to play it wisely, and negotiate with Dr. Qadri for a settlement, whereby his crowds leave Islamabad and new elections are announced ASAP."

The Pakistan National Assembly is set to dissolve by or before March 18, when its five-year term expires and new polls are held to elect lawmakers. But Qadri's demonstrations could speed up that process.

Qadri's supporters filling the capital's main Jinnah Avenue had waited expectantly all morning for the cleric to address them. Some were pointing toward the sky, claiming they saw the word "Allah" written in the clouds.

Earlier in the day, police fired tear gas and several rounds into the air, pushing back protesters. Access to the parliament has been sealed off by metal containers, behind which are more than 2,000 police and rangers in riot gear.

You May Like

Ebola Death Toll Nears 5,000 as Virus Advances

West Africa bears heaviest burden; Mali toddler’s death raises new fears More

Jordan’s Battle With Islamic State Militants Carries Domestic Risks

Despite Western concerns that IS militants are preparing a Jordanian offensive, analysts call the kingdom's solid intel a strong deterrent More

Asian-Americans Assume Office in Record Numbers

Steadily deepening engagement in local politics pays off for politicians like Chinese-American Judy Chu More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: mustafa from: karachi
January 15, 2013 10:09 PM
This is the corrupt govt in the history of pakistan. They have army of ministers with main target to increase their personal bank balance. Their families are living abroad and enjoy their life on poor pakistani tax money. we need complete change in the system so common pakistani get some relief and peace of mind.


by: sanman from: NYC
January 15, 2013 9:23 AM
Qadri is clearly a stooge of the Pak Military, who are very anxious to engineer a coup against the govt to prevent their opponent Nawaz Sharif from returning to power. Note the elections are to happen within a few months, but Qadri is launching his street protests now, asking to postpone them? A genuine democracy activist would ask for international observers, if they questioned the electoral process. Here, Qadri isn't even asking for that - he's asking instead for a new govt to be handpicked by the army (how convenient for the army!)

This is clearly another military coup in a country with a long history of military coups.


by: AA from: Toronto, ON
January 15, 2013 9:13 AM
This government will not resign peacefully, they have to be forced out by the people.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
October 25, 2014 4:21 PM
Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukraine

Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Smugglers Offer Cheap Passage From Turkey to Syria

Smugglers in Turkey offer a relatively cheap passage across the border into Syria. Ankara has stepped up efforts to stem the flow of foreign fighters who want to join Islamic State militants fighting for control of the Syrian border city of Kobani. But porous borders and border guards who can be bribed make illegal border crossings quite easy. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video Comanche Chief Quanah Parker’s Century-Old House Falling Apart

One of the most fascinating people in U.S. history was Quanah Parker, the last chief of the American Indian tribe, the Comanche. He was the son of a Comanche warrior and a white woman who had been captured by the Indians. Parker was a fierce warrior until 1875 when he led his people to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and took on a new, peaceful life. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Cache, Oklahoma, Quanah’s image remains strong among his people, but part of his heritage is in danger of disappearing.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.
Video

Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Ebola Orphanage Opens in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. Adam Bailes reports for VOA about a new interim care center that's aimed at helping the growing number of children affected by Ebola.

All About America

AppleAndroid