News / Asia

Father of Wounded Pakistani Girl Says She Will `Rise Again'

A handout picture received from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital/University Hospitals in Birmingham on October 26, 2012, shows Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, and her family.
A handout picture received from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital/University Hospitals in Birmingham on October 26, 2012, shows Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, and her family.
VOA News
The father of the 15-year-old Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban says her setback was temporary, and that she will "rise again."

Ziauddin Yousafzai spoke to reporters about his daughter, Malala Yousafzai, while visiting her Friday in the British hospital where she is being treated for serious injuries.

He said the gunmen who attacked Malala wanted to kill her, but that she is recovering at "encouraging speed and we are very happy." Yousafzai added that his daughter asked about the health of her family members and requested to see school books.

"Last night when we met, there were tears in our eyes because of happiness.  Out of happiness.  For some time we all cried a little bit and then she asked her mother, 'How are the two other girls?'  Shazia and Kainat.  She inquired about their health.  And she told me on the phone, 'Please bring me my books of Class Nine and I will attend my examination in Swat.'  The board examination.''

Malala's family members flew from Pakistan to Britain Thursday and went to see her at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.

Before arriving in Britain, Ziauddin Yousafzai told reporters that his daughter will return home to Pakistan after her medical treatment.  They were his first public comments since the October 9 shooting of Malala in Pakistan's northwestern Swat Valley.

Taliban gunmen shot the teenage girl in the head and neck as she left school.  She was internationally recognized for documenting Taliban atrocities in the area near her home and for promoting women's education.

She has been in critical condition since the shooting.

Pakistan's government is paying for all expenses related to her recovery and has pledged to protect her once she returns.  Queen Elizabeth is renowned for its expertise in dealing with her types of injuries.  She has been treated there for nearly two weeks.

Yousafzai's doctors say they expect her to make a good recovery.

U.S. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, a Democrat from Texas, has announced she will work with members of Congress to award Malala the prestigious Congressional Gold Medal. On Thursday, she spoke to VOA's Deewa Radio about Malala Yousafzai.

"I think she is an example of of the height of courage, and she's only a child," the congresswoman said. "She has created a movement of peace, but she's also created a movement of consciousness. And therefore, it is extremely important that the world recognizes her."

You May Like

Video Drug Use Rises in Afghanistan

Ninety percent of world’s heroin comes from Afghanistan More

Here's Your Chance to Live in a Deserted Shopping Mall

About one-third of the 1200 enclosed malls in the US are dead or dying. Here's what's being done with them. More

Video NASA: Big Antarctica Ice Shelf Is Disintegrating

US space agency’s new study indicates Larsen B shelf could break up in just a few years More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Lara
October 29, 2012 12:01 PM
Pray for you the brave girl!

by: Exenon from: Australia
October 26, 2012 8:53 PM
The importance of this schoolgirls sacrifice is that it has shown the Muslim world that the "madrasa" educated dysfunctional terrorists are not in any way party to the teachings of the Prophet and do not exist in Al Quran. In these pathetic colleges of hatred, reading plays a poor distant second to recitation and interpretation is handed down from those with a vested interest in political terrorism. They have a great fear of educated women, or of any woman who would not be a slave to their pathetic demands, as this will no doubt hasten the incursion of of democracy into their misogynistic enclaves of fear and depression.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 26, 2012 12:46 PM
She's still dressed as if in Pakistan. Can someone please tell her that she is in the UK, far away from the Swat Valley and from the taliban terrorists. Can someone tell her also to please remove those things that look like shrouds (or what is it called) that she's using to wrap herself like a packaging stuff. It's because of that kind of dressing that the Swat Valley monkeys think they can lay hands on her. By her actions and the projecting attempt on her life by the terrorists she has made herself an example of the freedom for women and children in the region and she must stand up to it once and for all. Mrs. Bhutto was killed for same struggle, but the civilized world will not allow that to happen to her. I am also against her return to Pakistan, and totally object to her return to Swat Valley - a den of terrorist robbers - if ever she'll go back to that region to continue the works of the woman-child education.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Poverty, Ignorance Force Underage Girls Into Marriagei
X
May 21, 2015 4:14 AM
The recent marriage of a 17-year old Chechen girl to a local police chief who was 30 years older and already had a wife caused an outcry in Russia and beyond. The bride was reportedly forced to marry and her parents were intimidated into giving their consent. The union spotlighted yet again the plight of many underage girls in developing countries. Zlatica Hoke reports poverty, ignorance and fear are behind the practice, especially in Asia and Africa.
Video

Video Poverty, Ignorance Force Underage Girls Into Marriage

The recent marriage of a 17-year old Chechen girl to a local police chief who was 30 years older and already had a wife caused an outcry in Russia and beyond. The bride was reportedly forced to marry and her parents were intimidated into giving their consent. The union spotlighted yet again the plight of many underage girls in developing countries. Zlatica Hoke reports poverty, ignorance and fear are behind the practice, especially in Asia and Africa.
Video

Video South Korea Marks Gwangju Uprising Anniversary

South Korea this week marked the 35th anniversary of a protest that turned deadly. The Gwangju Uprising is credited with starting the country’s democratic revolution after it was violently quelled by South Korea’s former military rulers. But as Jason Strother reports, some observers worry that democracy has recently been eroded.
Video

Video California’s Water System Not Created To Handle Current Drought

The drought in California is moving into its fourth year. While the state's governor is mandating a reduction in urban water use, most of the water used in California is for agriculture. But both city dwellers and farmers are feeling the impact of the drought. Some experts say the state’s water system was not created to handle long periods of drought. Elizabeth Lee reports from Ventura County, an agricultural region just northwest of Los Angeles.
Video

Video How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction

An international team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of the woolly mammoth. Led by the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, the work opens the door to recreate the huge herbivore, which last roamed the Earth 4,000 years ago. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble considers the science of de-extinction and its place on the planet
Video

Video Blind Boy Defines His Life with Music

Cole Moran was born blind. He also has cognitive delays and other birth defects. He has to learn everything by ear. Nevertheless, the 12-year-old has had an insatiable love for music since he was born. VOA’s June Soh introduces us to the young phenomenal harmonica player.
Video

Video Women to March for Peace Between Koreas

Prominent female activists from around the world plan to march through the demilitarized zone dividing North and South Korea to call for peace between the two neighbors, divided for more than 60 years. The event, taking place May 24, marks the International Women's Day for Peace and Disarmament and has been approved by both Koreas. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video Drug Use Rises in Afghanistan Following Record High Poppy Crops

Afghanistan has seen record high poppy crops during the last few years - and the result has been an alarming rise in illegal drug use and addiction in the war-torn country. VOA's Ayesha Tanzeem has this report from Kabul.
Video

Video America’s Front Lawn Gets Overhaul

America’s front yard is getting a much-needed overhaul. Almost two kilometers of lawn stretch from the U.S. Capitol to the Washington Monument. But the expanse of grass known as the National Mall has taken a beating over the years. Now workers are in the middle of restoring the lush, green carpet that fronts some of Washington’s best-known sights. VOA’s Steve Baragona took a look.

VOA Blogs