News / Asia

    Pakistani Forces Repel Another Karachi Attack

    • Security personnel inspect the site around a training center after gunmen attacked the facility in Karachi, Pakistan, June 10, 2014.
    • Armored personal carriers are seen at Jinnah International Airport after Sunday's attack by Taliban militants, in Karachi, Pakistan, June 10, 2014.
    • Planes are seen near a section of a damaged building at Jinnah International Airport, after Sunday's attack by Taliban militants, Karachi, Pakistan, June 10, 2014.
    • A security guard stands alert outside a training center for airport security personnel after an attack in Karachi, Pakistan, Tuesday, June 10, 2014
    • Pakistani paramilitary troops carry the coffin of their colleague who died during Sunday's attack on Jinnah International Airport, during his funeral in Karachi, Pakistan, June 9, 2014.
    • Smoke rises above the Jinnah International Airport where security forces battled militants, Karachi, Pakistan, June 9, 2014.
    • Members of the Bomb Disposal Squad defuse explosives and hand grenades along a sidewalk outside Jinnah International Airport in Karachi, Pakistan, June 9, 2014.
    • The governor of Sindh province, Ishrat ul Ebad, and security officials visit a damaged area after Sunday's attack on Jinnah International Airport in Karachi, Pakistan, June 9, 2014.
    • Fire illuminates the sky above the Jinnah International Airport in Karachi, Pakistan, June 8, 2014.
    VOA News
    Pakistani forces repelled an attack near Karachi's airport Tuesday, less than 48 hours after a brazen Taliban siege on Pakistan's busiest airport that left at least 36 people dead.

    The deputy general of the Airport Security Force, Colonel Tahir Ali, told reporters that at least two gunmen on a motorbike targeted the ASF's training academy on Tuesday, but fled after security forces retaliated. No one was reported hurt in the latest incident in Pakistan's southern port city and financial hub.

    Ali says a search operation was underway to find the attackers. The Civil Aviation Authority briefly suspended flights to and from the nearby Karachi airport but operations later resumed.

    Taliban claims responsibility

    The Pakistani Taliban has claimed responsibility for Tuesday's attack and warned of further violence.

    The incident comes on the heels of the Taliban's five-hour siege of Karachi's Jinnah International Airport that ended early Monday.

    Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif convened a meeting of top military and government officials Tuesday to review the law and order situation in the wake of the airport attack. The prime minister's office said the interior minister and army chief of staff were among those who briefed Sharif on security in Pakistan's tribal areas, Karachi and the southwestern province of Baluchistan.

    Also Tuesday, Interior Minister Nisar Ali Khan said Sunday's attackers carried rocket launchers and rocket-propelled grenades. He told the national parliament the attackers tried to destroy aircraft but were prevented from doing so by ASF personnel who sacrificed their lives to "save national assets."

    The interior minister also said the attackers were carrying a huge quantity of food and medicine -- what he called a indication that they had planned to create a hostage situation.

    Officials say 10 gunmen were among those killed along with seven workers, whose bodies were found on Tuesday in an airport cold storage facility.  

    Investigators say the bodies of the cargo company workers were burned beyond recognition.  The workers had sought refuge in the facility, however it was engulfed in flames as gunmen attacked the airport.

    Hours before the airport attack, suspected Sunni Muslim militants on Sunday killed at least 26 Shi'ite pilgrims in a suicide attack on buses carrying the worshippers in the town of Taftan, near the Iranian border. Authorities say one bomber was killed, while three others blew themselves up.

    UN chief  'deeply concerned'

    United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Monday he is "deeply concerned" about the surge in violence across Pakistan. He urged the Islamabad government to boost efforts to protect the rights of all people to practice their religion safely.

    In another development, the Pakistani military carried out a series of air strikes Tuesday on suspected militant targets in the northwestern Khyber region. The military says at least 25 militants have been killed.

    Critics said the airport siege dealt a critical blow to Prime Minister Sharif's efforts to negotiate a peace settlement with the Taliban, which ended a six-week cease-fire in April. The attack also puts pressure on the prime minister and military leaders to launch a formal offensive against militant strongholds in North Waziristan tribal agency.

    A Taliban spokesman linked the airport attack to recent military strikes against militant bases along the Afghan border and last year's killing of the group's leader, Hakimullah Mehsud, in a suspected U.S. drone strike.  



    VOA's Ayaz Gul contributed to this report from Islamabad, Pakistan.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Ed Miller
    June 11, 2014 9:36 AM
    Why do these various Islamic sects hate each other just as much as they hate non believers? Christian Fundamentalists are certainly repressive and closed-minded, but not as bad as these Muslims groups! Almost all religious dogma seems to be about building up one particular group and tearing down (even killing) everyone else! Sad!

    by: MUSTAFA from: INDIA
    June 10, 2014 6:14 AM
    This is a complete case of Neglegance on the part of Nawaz Govt. Now this become normal news terrorist kill innocent people every where in Pakistan and no killer capture by Nawaz Govt. People suspects to link with Saudi bribe aid to Nawaz to give freedom to human killers. I cannot understand Terrorist have more modern weapons, well trained to achieve their target than Pakistan security personnel. This is the time for Nawaz Govt to kill Terrorist otherwise they will damage Pakistan completely. Do not give weight to aid money take action which is best for Pakistan.
    In Response

    by: nakamura from: Tokyo
    June 10, 2014 10:23 AM
    I totally agree with you. Nawaz Govt shoul solve this problem by itself now.

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