News / Europe

Panetta: Afghan Campaign 'Succeeding' Despite Attacks

From left: U.S. General John Allen, nominated as Supreme Allied Commander Europe, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, United States Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, current Supreme Allied Commander Europe U.S. Admiral James Stavridis, and U.S.
From left: U.S. General John Allen, nominated as Supreme Allied Commander Europe, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, United States Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, current Supreme Allied Commander Europe U.S. Admiral James Stavridis, and U.S.
Al Pessin
— U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says after more than 11 years the war in Afghanistan is “succeeding,” and will not be derailed by the recent series of insider attacks or any other tactic the enemy might use.

At a NATO defense ministers' meeting in Brussels on Wednesday, Panetta and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen denied that allies are being defeated on the battlefield or losing resolve. It has been a difficult period for NATO and its partners in Afghanistan, with reports of a resurgent Taliban and a series of deadly attacks in which Afghan security forces turned on their NATO colleagues.
 
Rasmussen said NATO's strategy is working, and the alliance timeline is on track for full Afghan security control next year and the withdrawal of most foreign combat forces by the end of the following year. He said troops will begin leaving in the coming months, but as part of the plan, not in a “rush to the exits.”
 
Panetta served notice on the Taliban that it will not be able to derail the NATO plan.
 
“As I said to my fellow ministers, we have come too far, we have fought too many battles, we have spilled too much blood not to finish the job that we are all about," he said. "Whatever tactics the enemy throws at us — IEDs [improvised explosive devices], insider attacks, car bombs — we will not allow those tactics to divide us from our Afghan partners, and we will not allow those tactics to divert us from the mission that we are dedicated to.”
 
Panetta said the allied effort is “succeeding” and “has turned an important corner,” but is still at a “critical point.” He also said the allies and the Afghan government must stick together.
 
“What tests the coalition is not so much the problem of insider attacks, but rather how effectively we respond to those attacks," said Panetta. "Partnering even closer will frustrate the enemy's designs to capitalize on this problem.”
 
The defense secretary called again on his NATO colleagues to fill the shortfall in trainers for Afghan forces. Despite years of such calls, Panetta said the alliance is still 58 teams short of what it needs. The training and mentoring of Afghan forces is a key element in the NATO effort to leave a stable country behind when it withdraws most of its forces.
 
NATO defense ministers also ordered a military planning effort to determine how many coalition troops to leave behind and for what purpose. They expect the plan to be finalized next year.

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by: Jim M from: Italy
October 11, 2012 10:48 AM
Sounds just like McNamara during Vietnam; end result will be the same (from someone with 4 1/2 years in Afghanistan)


by: Michael from: Bangkok
October 10, 2012 11:21 PM
Right on anomyout. Maybe presidents should prohibit the defense secretary from making public statements so that they do not gain the reputation of politicians. Westmorlandish comments only make the situation worse.

We all know Aghastastan is doomed, so Panetta only diminishes himself by telling us lies that even the deranged know are a lie. Unfortunately, the odor of mendacity clings to the clothes and is not removed with dry cleaning.


by: Anonymot from: ct
October 10, 2012 1:20 PM
Why, exactly, do we get dumb people at this high level of government. I'm sure Panetta is a college grad and has a satisfactory IQ, but intelligence in a position like his means that he doesn't take everyone else for stupid. It means he recognizes that he's not in the 18th Century, but in a period where even the rather pitiful news coverage we get tells us that we were not, are not, and will not be "successful" in Afghanistan. It was Panetta under Bush who helped get us into the Middle Eastern disaster. So now he says it was wonderful. I assume he hold a lot of stock in armament manufacturers, but don't tell me idiocies such asAfghanistan was not a horrific error on the part of the Bush & Obama admins. Don't tell me that Obama picked Panetta so that the war would stop.

We filter out brains at the level of Dog Catcher in this country. Does anyone still wonder why our society, our economy and our position in world affairs is around our ankles?

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