News / USA

Pentagon: No Plans to Consult Iran Over Possible Action in Iraq

FILE- Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby speaks at a news briefing about the situation in Iraq, at the Pentagon, June 13, 2014.
FILE- Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby speaks at a news briefing about the situation in Iraq, at the Pentagon, June 13, 2014.
The Pentagon is downplaying speculation about U.S. and Iranian military cooperation in Iraq, hours after Secretary of State John Kerry made the suggestion in an interview.  A military spokesman told reporters Monday the U.S. is not planning to work with Iran militarily to protect its troubled neighbor

With militant Islamic fighters claiming new cities in Iraq and distributing video purporting to show mass executions, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry raised the possibility of working with Iran to stem the crisis.

In an interview with with Katie Couric, Yahoo News' global anchor,  Kerry called the advance by the Syrian-based al-Qaida affiliate an "existential" danger to Iraq. He suggested the U.S. may need to go "step by step" with Iran, and on whether to cooperate militarily said, "I would not rule out anything."

Kerry told Couric the militants are a challenge to the region and "clearly are focused not just there, but they’re focused on trying to do harm to Europe, to America and other people."

A few hours later at the Pentagon, Rear Admiral John Kirby made clear that right now, the U.S. military is prepared to go only so far.  
 
"There are no plans to have consultations with Iran about military activities in Iraq,” Kirby said.

He did not address reports that Iran already has sent members of its elite Revolutionary Guard Corps into Iraq. Both Kirby and Kerry suggested the possibility of talks with Iran this week regarding the situation inside Iraq.

“We encourage Iran, like all the neighbors in the region, to play a constructive role, to respect the territorial integrity and the sovereignty of Iraq while Iraq is going through this difficult time,” said Kirby.

At the State Department, spokeswoman Jen Psaki also said the U.S. encourages Iran's government to play a role "in reducing the sectarian nature of how Iraq is being governed, that that's a role that they could play," Psaki said. "We don't feel it's useful for the Iraqis to rely on the capacity of Iran's security forces."

U.S. officials have criticized Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki for not doing enough to include more Sunni and Kurdish leaders in the government in Baghdad.

U.S. defense officials said they are continuing to prepare a range of military options to present to President Barack Obama, designed to help the Iraqi security forces and break ISIL’s momentum.

The U.S. already has sent about 100 additional troops to help with security at its embassy in Baghdad. And in recent days, the Pentagon has ordered the USS George H.W. Bush, an aircraft carrier, and guided missile destroyers into the Persian Gulf.

On Monday, officials announced the USS Mesa Verde also is heading into the Gulf with 550 Marines and five Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft, capable of evacuating personnel if needed.

A senior State Department official said Sunday that Secretary Kerry spoke with his counterparts from Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates about combating fighters from the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.

Deputy U.S. Secretary of State William Burns is in Vienna for international talks on limiting Iran's nuclear program. A senior State Department official said Burns may have discussions with Iranian officials about Iraq, but that those would be "completely and separately" removed from nuclear negotiations.

Jeff Seldin

Jeff works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters covering a wide variety of subjects, from the nature of the growing terror threat in Northern Africa to China’s crackdown on Tibet and the struggle over immigration reform in the United States. You can follow Jeff on Twitter at @jseldin or on Google Plus.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: George Sayre from: Nevada
June 16, 2014 7:15 PM
An oil embargo if we take the wrong side?


by: meanbill from: USA
June 16, 2014 6:30 PM
MY OPINION? -- Iran is more worried about that US carrier task force, and the US intentions, on what they plan to do with it? -- Could it's planes attack an Iran nuclear reactor?


by: meanbill from: USA
June 16, 2014 5:45 PM
MY OPINION? -- The Iran and US meeting on the Iraq conflict was called off, because Iran demanded to know what side the US was on -- (WAS IT?) -- (the Sunni US armed terrorists and Sunni US trained Security Forces) -- (OR?) -- will the US now support the Shia Maliki Iraq government, in this Iraq conflict?

THE WORLD would like to know too? -- (What side is America on), when they armed the Sunni terrorists in Syria, and trained the Sunni Security Forces now fighting against the Iraq government? --- (Yea, like the US is going to tell Iran?)


by: richard enders
June 16, 2014 5:21 PM
it's one thing to be boring , but John kerry just seems to be in way over his head. he misunderstands the intentions of iran, and believes that we have a common interest here? My god. Yes both want ISIS less powerful. But our ultimate objectives are quite different. Has he watched too many movies?


by: Fred Flintsone
June 16, 2014 5:01 PM
Syrian gov bombing the western supported opposition in Iraq, talks of Iran and US going in jointly.One big dark comedy.

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