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Perceived Corruption High in Sub-Saharan Africa



Several African nations were among the worst performers in Transparency International's annual report on perceived corruption.

Somalia was one of three nations receiving the lowest score in the report released Tuesday by the corruption watchdog group.

The report gave each nation a score between 0 and 100. Besides Somalia, African countries that scored 20 or below on the list include Sudan, South Sudan, Guinea-Bissau, Equatorial Guinea, Chad and Eritrea.

Only three African nations received scores above 50 - Botswana, Cape Verde, and Rwanda.

Transparency International says Africa has improved on indicators related to "human development and sustainable economic development." But the Berlin-based group says there has been a "noticeable deterioration" in terms of safety and the rule of law.



Transparency International Executive Director Robert Barrington says countries suffering from conflict, such as Somalia, are the worst performers.

Barrington says Rwanda's score has improved because its government has made a concerted effort to fight corruption.

Denmark and New Zealand topped the list with scores of 91. The United States' score is 73.

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