News / Europe

Pope Appoints Cardinals To Reflect Church's Diversity

Pope Francis delivers a speech during the Angelus prayer from the window of the Apostolic palace in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican, Jan. 12, 2014.
Pope Francis delivers a speech during the Angelus prayer from the window of the Apostolic palace in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican, Jan. 12, 2014.
Pope Francis has made his first appointment of cardinals to advise him in leading the world's one billion Roman Catholics. The pope used his weekly Sunday blessing at the Vatican to announce his selection of 19 cardinals, 16 of whom are eligible to vote for the next leader of the church.  Some observers think his selections reflect a desire to make the church's top advisory body more representative of nations beyond Europe and North America.
 
Thousands of Roman Catholics greeted Pope Francis on Sunday, as he appeared at the window of the Apostolic Palace to announce his choices for the new cardinals of the church.
 
Vatican

  • Pietro Parolin, Titular Archbishop of Acquapendente, Secretary of State
  • Lorenzo Baldisseri, Titular Archbishop of Diocleziana, Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops
  • Gerhard Ludwig Mueller, Archbishop-Bishop emeritus of Regensburg, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith
  • Beniamino Stella, Titular Archbishop of Midila, Prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy
     
Europe

  • Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster, United Kingdom
  • Loris Francesco Capovilla, Titular Archbishop of Mesembria (Bulgaria)
  • Fernando Sebastian Aguilar, C.M.F., Archbishop emeritus of Pamplona (Spain)
  • Gualtiero Bassetti, Archbishop of Perugia-Citta della Pieve, Italy

Latin America

  • Leopoldo Jose Brenes Solorzano, Archbishop of Managua, Nicaragua
  • Orani Joao Tempesta, O.Cist., Archbishop of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Mario Aurelio Poli, Archbishop of Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Ricardo Ezzati Andrello, S.D.B., Archbishop of Santiago del Cile, Chile

North America & Caribbean

  • Gerald Cyprien Lacroix, Archbishop of Quebec, Canada
  • Chibly Langlois, Bishop of Les Cayes, Haiti
  • Kelvin Edward Felix, Archbishop emeritus of Castries (Saint Lucia)

Africa
 
  • Jean-Pierre Kutwa, Archbishop of Abidjan, Ivory Coast
  • Philippe Nakellentuba Ouedraogo, Archbishop of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

Asia

  • Andrew Yeom Soo jung, Archbishop of Seoul, South Korea   
  • Orlando B. Quevedo, O.M.I., Archbishop of Cotabato, Philippines
"I will name 16 new cardinals who, belonging to 12 different nations from each part of the world, represent the deep ecclesial relationship between the Church of Rome and the other churches scattered around the world," said Francis during the announcement.
 
The 16 cardinals the pope referred to are all under the age of 80, making them eligible to enter a conclave of 122 men who can elect a future pope. He appointed another three cardinals older than 80 to honorary positions.
 
The appointments are Francis' first since he assumed the leadership of the church last March.
 
Philip Pullella, the Vatican correspondent for the Reuters news agency, said it is significant that only four of the new cardinal electors come from inside the Vatican bureaucracy.
 
“This is not surprising because Francis has said that he doesn't want a Church made up of career diplomats or career priests or career cardinals, that the Church is around the world. So most of these are actually working archbishops who run big dioceses,” said Pullella.
 
Six of the new electors are Europeans - four from Italy, one from Britain and one from Germany. A seventh elector is a Canadian.
 
Europeans and North Americans have long made up more than half of the electors, who sit in a body called the College of Cardinals.
 
Some observers think that is why Pope Francis also chose nine electors from other parts of the world - five from South and Central America, two from Africa, and two from Asia.
 
The nine additional electors include nationals of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti and Nicaragua, as well as citizens of Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, South Korea and the Philippines.
 
Vatican correspondent Andrea Gagliarducci of The Catholic News Agency said the pope, who is from Argentina, wants to make the church more universal.
 
"Pope Francis, in creating these new cardinals, is making a College of Cardinals which is... more oriented to the peripheries of the Church, because he thinks that from the peripheries you can see the Church better and so  he wants something like that," said Gagliarducci.
 
The new cardinals will be formally installed at a Vatican ceremony on February 22.

Michael Lipin

Michael covers international news for VOA on the web, radio and TV, specializing in the Middle East and East Asia Pacific. Follow him on Twitter @Michael_Lipin

You May Like

For Lebanon-based Refugees, Desperation Fuels Perilous Passage

In a war that has caused an estimated three million people to flee Syria, efforts to make perilous sea journey in search of asylum expected to increase More

South African Brewer Tackles Climate Change

Mega-brewer SAB Miller sent delegates to climate summit in Peru, says it is one of many private companies taking their own steps to fight climate change More

Indonesia Reports Increase in Citizens Joining Islamic State

Officials say more than 350 of its citizens are now in Syria or Iraq to fight with Islamic State - 50 more than last month More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Will Pakistan School Shooting Galvanize Pakistan Against Extremism?i
X
Ayesha Tanzeem
December 17, 2014 11:54 AM
The attack on a military school in Pakistan’s northwest city of Peshawar left 141 dead, including 132 children. Strong statements of condemnation poured in from across the world. The country announced three days of mourning, and the leadership, both political and military, promised retribution. VOA's Ayesha Tanzeem looks at how likely the Pakistani government is to clamp down on all extremist groups.
Video

Video Will Pakistan School Shooting Galvanize Pakistan Against Extremism?

The attack on a military school in Pakistan’s northwest city of Peshawar left 141 dead, including 132 children. Strong statements of condemnation poured in from across the world. The country announced three days of mourning, and the leadership, both political and military, promised retribution. VOA's Ayesha Tanzeem looks at how likely the Pakistani government is to clamp down on all extremist groups.
Video

Video ‘Anti-Islamization’ Marches Increase Tensions In Germany

Anti-immigrant rallies in Germany have been building in recent weeks, peaking Monday night in the city of Dresden where tens of thousands of people turned out to demonstrate against what they call the ‘Islamization’ of the West. Germany has offered asylum to more Syrian refugees than any other country, and this appears to have set off the protests. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.
Video

Video Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countries

Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.
Video

Video Turkey's Authoritarianism Dismays Western Allies

The Turkish government has been defiant in the face of criticism at home and abroad for its raids targeting opposition media. The European Union on Monday expressed dismay after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan lashed out at Brussels for criticizing his government's action. Turkey's bid to be considered for EU membership has been on hold while critics accuse the NATO ally of increasingly authoritarian rule. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video US-China Year in Review: Hong Kong to Climate Change

The United States is pushing for a code of conduct to resolve territorial disputes in the South China Sea as it works to improve commercial ties with Beijing. VOA State Department correspondent Scott Stearns reports on a year of U.S. policy toward China from Hong Kong to climate change.
Video

Video Japanese Leader’s Election Win Raises Potential for Conflict with Neighbors

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his allies easily won a two-thirds majority in parliament Sunday, even though the country has slipped into recession under his conservative policies. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from Seoul, that the prime minister’s victory will empower him to continue economic reforms but also pursue a nationalist agenda that will likely increase tensions with Japan’s neighbors.
Video

Video Nuba Mountain Families Hide in Caves to Escape Aerial Bombings

Despite ongoing peace talks between Sudan's government and the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, or SPLM-N, daily aerial attacks continue in South Kordofan province’s Nuba Mountains. Adam Bailes was there and reports for VOA that government forces are targeting civilian areas, rather than military positions, with their daily bombardments.

All About America

AppleAndroid