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    Pope John Paul II to Become Saint After Miracle Approved

    Pope John Paul II to Become Saint After Miracle Approvedi
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    July 05, 2013 11:25 PM
    The Vatican has announced that the late Pope John Paul II will be made a saint, after Pope Francis approved a second miracle attributed to the Polish pontiff. John Paul II led the Roman Catholic Church from 1978 to 2005. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.
    Pope John Paul II to Become Saint After Miracle Approved
    Henry Ridgwell
    The Vatican has announced that the late Pope John Paul II will be made a saint, after Pope Francis approved a second miracle attributed to the Polish pontiff.  John Paul II led the Roman Catholic Church from 1978 to 2005.  

    It was in the small Costa Rican town of La Union de Tres Rios where the Vatican says Pope John Paul II performed his second miracle since his death - the criteria required for sainthood.

    Costa Rica's Floribeth Mora looks at a bust of Pope John Paul II while giving her account of a miracle attributed to John Paul, during a press conference at the Archbishop's office in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 5, 2013.Costa Rica's Floribeth Mora looks at a bust of Pope John Paul II while giving her account of a miracle attributed to John Paul, during a press conference at the Archbishop's office in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 5, 2013.
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    Costa Rica's Floribeth Mora looks at a bust of Pope John Paul II while giving her account of a miracle attributed to John Paul, during a press conference at the Archbishop's office in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 5, 2013.
    Costa Rica's Floribeth Mora looks at a bust of Pope John Paul II while giving her account of a miracle attributed to John Paul, during a press conference at the Archbishop's office in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 5, 2013.
    The late pontiff was credited with curing Floribeth Mora, a woman from the town who had a severe brain injury. Her family prayed to the pope's memory and says she was cured on May 1, 2011.

    Mora's neighbor Cecilia Chavez voiced the community's feelings.

    "How can it be that in a small country such as Costa Rica, in this poor small neighborhood, this miracle took place?  It's amazing!  There are no words to describe it," she said.

    Floribeth Mora had walked into a hospital in Costa Rica's capital San Jose complaining of a headache.

    Neurosurgeon Alejandro Vargas Roman, who diagnosed her with a brain aneurysm, says the question of why it disappeared without surgical intervention is without explanation.  "I have never read about this anywhere around the world," he said.

    John Paul had already been credited with healing a French nun of Parkinson's disease.

    Vatican media reports suggest the canonization ceremony could come as soon as December.

    At London's Westminster Cathedral, Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor gave his reaction.

    How to Become a Saint in the Catholic Church:

    - Candidates for sainthood undergo an investigation
    - Inquiries are made into the person's life, reputation, and activities during their lifetime
    - Proof that no one has proclaimed or is already proclaiming and honoring the person as a saint before its been officially declared
    - An exhaustive examination of the person's written and spoken (transcripts) works
    - If investigators declare the candidate venerable, evidence of miracles attributed to the candidate's intercession with God is sought
    - Miracles need to be documented and authenticated
    - Actual ceremony usually takes place in St. Peter's Square outside the Vatican
    "We shouldn't be too surprised that this has happened quite quickly after his death," he said. "Because certainly in my lifetime, and many others,' he's been the most outstanding pope.  And they have Pope Gregory the Great, Pope Leo the Great, I think this will be Pope John Paul the Great."

    Worshippers at Westminster Cathedral welcomed the news. 

    Sisters Alice Heerey and May Lovett were visiting from Ireland.

    They said: "Wonderful news for the Catholic Church  Yes.  And let's hope that it brings more people back to the Church. Especially the young people."

    FILE - In this file photo taken on April 23, 1997, Pope John Paul II waves to faithful as he crosses St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.FILE - In this file photo taken on April 23, 1997, Pope John Paul II waves to faithful as he crosses St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.
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    FILE - In this file photo taken on April 23, 1997, Pope John Paul II waves to faithful as he crosses St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.
    FILE - In this file photo taken on April 23, 1997, Pope John Paul II waves to faithful as he crosses St. Peter's Square at the Vatican.
    Pope John Paul II led the Roman Catholic Church from 1978 to 2005 - during the fall of communism, including in his native country of Poland.

    But human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell questioned John Paul's legacy.

    "On women's rights and gay rights, he opposed them both within the Church and within the wider society," he said. "He supported laws that discriminate against women and against gay people.  I don't think such a person is fit for sainthood."

    The Vatican announced another former pontiff, Pope John XXIII, will also be made a saint after the current Pope Francis waived the customary rules which require a second miracle.

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    Comments
         
    by: Marianne from: rochester ny
    July 24, 2013 4:42 PM
    the whole point of sainthood is that the person allowed God to work through him or her-lived a life of subservience to God's will. the person does not perform a miracle on their own. they put up no obstacle - they lived a life in God's presence at all times

    by: Joseph from: USA
    July 19, 2013 12:23 PM
    A real miracle would have been performed if John Paul could have had his minions keep their devilish paws off the young boys!!

    by: jose d martinez from: kalapana hawaii
    July 19, 2013 12:57 AM
    some where I read that we should not worship any image or any thing that try's to put its self be for GOD. I am a jealous GOD the Lord says. He remembers we are dust.How can any of these mortal men and women be saints ? all they are is a tool God uses to show humanity just how things are. let he who has eyes see.God does not force any one to believe in HIM you your self must come to that point in your life, if you believe in any thing or pray to anything, let it be the GOD of the bible. any thing else is the work of humans,who GOD chooses for HIS purpose.

    by: mariel damagon from: baguio city
    July 09, 2013 2:57 AM
    I'm not saying that I don't agree that he should be canonized. My question only is that, is it Pope John Paul II really the one who did the miracle? Isn't he is an instrument or a disciple sent from God?
    We should be thanking God first since He sent Pope John Paul II to perform these miracles and it better to talk to God after being cured and let us thank also Pope John Paul II for doing God's will

    by: Antony
    July 08, 2013 7:46 AM
    John Paul ll played a dubious role in the Falklands War between Britain and Argentina in 1982 which has become obscured with the passing of time.

    The first ever papal visit to Britain had been arranged well in advance and took place thirty years ago in the midst of the Falklands War between Britain and Catholic Argentina. The Vatican was compelled by political necessity to follow the British visit with a hastily arranged papal visit to Argentina, otherwise it risked undermining its Latin American base.

    The cooperation of the military junta that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983 (and is notorious for the so-called “Dirty War” against its own citizens) was needed for the latter visit. Suggestions that the Pope cold shouldered the junta during the visit do not match the facts. Two photos that appeared in the Catholic press at the time are of particular interest in this regard.

    These photos are to be found in an article about this fascinating chapter in papal history that reveals a great deal about the Vatican’s modus operandi in modern times —

    http://www.wallsofjericho.info/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=33&Itemid=68

    by: jmstalk
    July 07, 2013 5:31 PM
    'But human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell questioned John Paul's legacy....."On women's rights and gay rights, he opposed them both within the Church and within the wider society," he said. "He supported laws that discriminate against women and against gay people. I don't think such a person is fit for sainthood."'

    Peter Tatchell does not understand that a saint is someone who affirms and submits to Magisterium teaching, not one who opposes or resists. This is precisely what makes a saint a saint: the humility to accept all that Holy Mother Church teaches on faith and morals. Homosexual (acts) are explicitly condemned in the Bible. How people can ignore this is beyond me. It is common sense that God intended marriage between one man and one woman as described in Genesis and affirmed in the New Testament. That this generation wants to redefine the rules and then condemn traditionalists as haters is beyond arrogant.
    In Response

    by: Chris from: Florida
    July 08, 2013 5:39 PM
    Jmstalk, I agree. In regards to women's rights, Pope John Paul II couldn't have been more in favor of equal rights for women. Read the following link, particularly item #4:
    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/letters/documents/hf_jp-ii_let_29061995_women_en.html
    I'm assuming Peter Tatchell is referring to the former Pope's opposition to abortion, which, like homosexuality, the Catholic Church is also opposed to. Protecting all life, from conception to death, is God's will. Women have the right to choose to engage in life- creating acts, that's where women have choice. Once life is created, it is only God who has the power to take that life. As for instances of rape, less than five percent of victims become pregnant as a result of this violent crime (http://www.rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-victims, http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/post/the-claim-that-the-incidence-of-rape-resulting-in-pregnancy-is-very-low/2013/06/12/936bc45e-d3ad-11e2-8cbe-1bcbee06f8f8_blog.html). This article should have been more objective when reporting on Pope John Paul II, and Peter Tatchell should have been more specific about what Pope JP opposed and didn't oppose instead of generalizing.

    by: Sean
    July 06, 2013 4:04 PM
    What a load of crap.

    by: Frances Johnson from: Denver, Colorado
    July 06, 2013 1:41 PM
    Hopefully, since Pope Francis has the powers to declare canonization with but one miracle, he will speed along canonizations long overdue for our Beloved Pope Pius XII and Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen. One cannot deny the merit of Sainthood for both these wonderful gifts from God. It would be nice to see FOUR canonizations at the same time, the two mentioned Popes plus these two. May God grant it SOON.

    by: christian from: sheffield
    July 06, 2013 3:37 AM
    I fail to understand why the Pope doesn't make everyone a saint
    then we all go to heaven,that will be one in the eye for the
    devil;
    In Response

    by: mariel from: baguio city
    July 09, 2013 2:26 AM
    Pope John Paul 2 to be canonized? I'm not saying that I don't agree of it...but, the question is....is Pope John Paul really the one who cured the woman,,,,isn't it is best to thank God first because He uses Pope John Paul as His instrument to accomplish a task or a mission for the world to know that our God is a living God...

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