News / Asia

Aid Trickles Into Remote Parts of Philippines

  • Sailors aboard the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington load containers of water onto an MH-60S Seahawk for the Philippines, Nov. 15. 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • A C-2A Greyhound carrying relief supplies for Operation Damayan prepares to land on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington, Nov. 15, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • Sailors aboard the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington load containers of water onto an MH-60S Seahawk, Nov. 15, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • Sailors aboard the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington load containers of water onto an MH-60S Seahawk, Nov. 15, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • An Aviation Electrician’s Mate directs a MH-60S helicopter from the USNS Charles Drew as it lifts a pallet of diesel en route to the Philippines, Nov. 14. 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • A Naval Aircrewman prepares to drop supplies, Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • Marines load supplies onto a forklift at Tacloban Air Base, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • A Naval Aircrewman prepares to drop supplies, Tacloban, Philippines, Nov., 14, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
     
  • An MH-60S Seahawk drops supplies onto Tacloban Air Base, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013. (U.S. Navy)
  • Marines and U.S. Army Soldiers load supplies onto an MV-22 Osprey, Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 14, 2013.(U.S. Navy)

U.S. Military Delivers Aid to the Philippines

Simone OrendainVOA News
Badly needed aid and relief supplies have begun arriving in the hard-to-reach areas of the central Philippines one week after a super typhoon tore across the region.
Many people in need, however, still have received little or no assistance. 

Interior Secretary Mar Roxas says that in a situation like this, speed is of the utmost importance. Speaking Friday in the devastated city of Tacloban, he said that the need is massive, immediate and not everyone can be reached.

Disaster relief chief Eduardo del Rosario told reporters that the official death toll from the storm has risen to 3,621.

The aftermath of the disaster has made it difficult to tally the number of victims. But on Friday, the government estimated 1.4 million people had been displaced and 400,000 of them are still in need of food and basic necessities.
 
But now, officials with the U.S. Embassy in Manila say there are significantly more places receiving the goods for distribution, compared to a day ago.
 
Deputy Chief of Mission Brian Goldbeck told reporters supply drops are being made in at least 16 locations in the worst-hit island provinces.
 
“So if you think of it as a hub-and-spoke arrangement those are being pushed out and then from those endpoints even more is being pushed out from there," Goldbeck explained. " I think there is good distribution now that is happening from many areas that we have not seen before.”
 
Sailors aboard the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) load containers of water onto an MH-60S Seahawk from the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12 in support of Operation Damayan, Nov. 15,
Sailors aboard the U.S. Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) load containers of water onto an MH-60S Seahawk from the "Golden Falcons" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12 in support of Operation Damayan, Nov. 15,
Some 20 helicopters arrived on the USS George Washington aircraft carrier, which docked on Thursday night at Samar Province to the east of Leyte. Goldbeck said they will be used to deliver food, medicines and other supplies to inaccessible areas. Philippine choppers are also dropping off goods.
 
Philippine Aid Donors Factbox

Many countries and organizations are providing humanitarian aid to the Philippines in the wake of Friday's typhoon. The most prominent donors include:

  • UNITED NATIONS: $25 million released from U.N. emergency relief fund, appealing for more
  • UNITED STATES: $20 million in aid, plus military assistance
  • EU: $17 million
  • BRITAIN: $16 million, plus military assistance
  • JAPAN: $10 million, and an emergency medical relief team
  • UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: $10 million
  • AUSTRALIA: $9.3 million, including medical personnel
  • SOUTH KOREA: $5 million, plus a disaster relief team
  • CANADA: up to $5 million
  • U.N. WORLD FOOD PROGRAM: $2 million
  • NEW ZEALAND: $1.7 million
  • U.N. CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF): $1.3 million worth of supplies
  • HSBC (global banking group): $1 million
  • SAMSUNG (South Korean technology company): $1 million
  • TAIWAN: $200,000
  • VATICAN: $150,000 in initial assistance
  • CHINA: $100,000
  • CHINA RED CROSS: $100,000
But despite the reports of progress, the situation in the hard-hit city of Tacloban remains challenging. International humanitarian organizations expressed dismay that they still have not been able to reach beyond certain points of the city.
 
Orla Fagan, a U.N. Humanitarian Affairs public information officer in Manila, expressed worry about a dwindling fuel supply for vehicles transporting aid. But she said that was just one concern.
 
“There is also issues of no power. I don’t know what the situation is this morning," Fagan admitted. "There is communications issues. The mobile phones are coming up and going down at the moment… you’ve got the roads covered, as well, still in debris.”
 
The Philippine government has said this week the crisis has been one of the largest “logistics and relief operations ever taken on by the country.” On Friday officials defended the aid effort despite the failures to reach many storm survivors.
 
"In a situation like this nothing is fast enough," Interior Secretary Mar Roxas told reporters in Tacloban. "The need is massive, the need is immediate. You cannot set anybody aside because everybody, all at the same time is hungry, all at the same time have no water, all at the same time have no communication, no power. So this is, the challenge here is almost like D-Day, Normandy."

On Friday morning officials said the government had reached its goal of handing out food packs to the 40 remote locations around Tacloban in a 24-hour period. These are good for at least two days, possibly three. But that means similar food runs will have to continue in order to feed hundreds of thousands of hungry, homeless people.

  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors wait for their evacuation flights at the airport in Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 21, 2013.
  • A typhoon survivor sits beside the body bag containing his child in Tacloban, central Philippines, Nov. 20, 2013.
  • A Philippine Air Force crew looks out from his helicopter as Typhoon Haiyan-ravaged city of Tacloban is seen in the background, during a flight to deliver relief goods, Nov. 19, 2013.
  • The brakelight of a delivery truck lights up a boy's face as survivors struggle to be the first in line during the distribution of relief goods in typhoon-hit Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 18, 2013.
  • Firemen unload Typhoon Haiyan victims in body bags from a truck on the roadside until forensic experts can register and bury them in a mass grave outside of Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 19, 2013.
  • A Typhoon Haiyan survivor carries a bag of his recovered belongings in the ruins of his rural neighborhood on the outskirts of Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 18, 2013.
  • A man uses a shovel to clean up mud inside St. Joseph Parish church, which was badly damaged by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 18, 2013.
  • Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk along a road in the destroyed port in the town of Guiuan, Philippines, Nov. 15, 2013.
  • A young boy, a survivor of Typhoon Haiyan covers his ears as military C-130 aircraft land at the airport in Tacloban, central Philippines, Nov. 15, 2013.
  • Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan shade themselves from the rising sun after spending the night on the tarmac in the airport in Tacloban, where they wait to be evacuated, Nov. 15, 2013.
  • Toppled coconut trees dot a mountain in an area devastated by typhoon Haiyan in Leyte province, central Philippines, Nov. 15, 2013.

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Comments
     
by: Keen from: Philippines
November 21, 2013 3:21 AM
The Filipino community really acknowledged the support and assistance from the international community...However, after almost two weeks since Super Typhoon Haiyan wreck havoc the Philippines some other areas were not given help yet especially the northern part of Cebu...I hope hope humanitarian assistance will reach these parts too...


by: Concerned from: Cebu
November 15, 2013 7:53 AM
Thank you so much America for your aid. However when you deliver the food aid to the small towns and villages can you please take the time to ensure the distribution to the people and not to the local politicians

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