News / Asia

    Tokyo: 6 Chinese Ships Enter Waters Near Disputed Islands

    A group of disputed islands known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen from the city government of Tokyo's survey vessel in the East China Sea, September 2, 2012.
    A group of disputed islands known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen from the city government of Tokyo's survey vessel in the East China Sea, September 2, 2012.
    VOA News
    Japan says six Chinese patrol ships have entered its territorial waters near disputed islands in the East China Sea, further heightening the tensions over the uninhabited archipelago claimed both by Tokyo and Beijing.

    Japan's Coast Guard said two Chinese vessels entered Japanese waters early Friday, and four more vessels arrived soon after.  The Coast Guard says it has issued a warning for them to leave.

    China's official news agency, Xinhua, Thursday quoted the Ministry of Agriculture as saying the vessels would be dispatched on routine patrol near the islands to assert China's sovereignty and protect fishermen.

    The rocky islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, have been the focus of recurring flare-ups between the two sides.

    On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered outside the Japanese embassy in Beijing to condemn Japan's move to nationalize the privately owned islands in the resource-rich maritime area.  They called for Japan to leave the uninhabited islands and for a boycott of Japanese products.

    Chinese authorities allowed the demonstrations to proceed, although police prevented protesters from getting close to the Japanese embassy compound.

    Japan's Kyodo news agency reported that anti-Japan protests also took place in Shanghai and Fuzhou, the capital of Fujian Province.

    China's vice commerce minister, Jiang Zengwei, warned Thursday the dispute could affect trade between China and Japan, while Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba called for calm.

    China is Japan’s largest trading partner.

    On Monday, Japan announced a $26 million deal to nationalize the disputed island chain, whose waters contain rich fishing grounds and potential oil reserves. Japanese officials said the move was meant to ensure that no one triggers a confrontation with China by developing the uninhabited islands.
     
    China called Japan's purchase a violation of Chinese sovereignty, saying China does not recognize any Japanese ownership of the islands.  China urged Japan to revoke the purchase immediately.

    Japan rejected China's demand, saying Tokyo will not reconsider a transaction involving what it considers to be sovereign Japanese territory.

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    by: Anonymous from: Taiwan
    September 15, 2012 10:00 AM
    The 6 ships start patrols in seas around Senkaku a day before an approaching Typhoon? Clearly these ships are making a dry run to land troops on the islands during the roughest seas between Senkaku and Japanese ports.

    The Chinese can take them tomorrow, even deliberately shipwreck on them if they have too because the Japanese coast guard will be berthed in port far away from the Senkaku.

    They figure once on the islands - nobody, especially not Obama, will forcibly remove them without a fight.

    by: john from: german
    September 14, 2012 11:07 PM
    i don't think anyone need to worry this dispute betwween China and Japan, both countries will calm down to solve this problem, because they have great common economic trade, else, they are not Islam extremist.

    by: Pete Dooley from: Florida USA
    September 14, 2012 9:27 AM
    Who is going to tow them off the reefs this time... Last time they sent a cruiser to this area they ran the thing aground. Maybe four of the vessels are tugs.

    by: Nick from: Japan
    September 14, 2012 8:37 AM
    Everyone needs to calm down. If us humans was to survive the next 100 years we have to cooperate for once and share resources.
    In Response

    by: shaw from: china
    September 15, 2012 2:18 PM
    Would you like to share your resources with China? We wont mind if you wanna do so. If your government wants a better future, never do such silly things again .We are just protecting the land that belongs to us!

    by: Alex from: USA
    September 14, 2012 8:29 AM
    Telling the truth, right wing extremist Japanese wish to start WWIII, and this is the right point.

    by: remie from: canada
    September 14, 2012 8:03 AM
    Chinese land is all stolen at one time in history and yet they use history. Also chinese abroad like Jonathan Huang who ran from china to Canada critize Canada . If u chinese r going to use history be consistant and not hyprocrit. Those island belong to Japan TODAY
    In Response

    by: Alex from: USA
    September 14, 2012 8:41 AM
    Suppose I rob your family and hold your property today. What would you say? IT BELONGS TO ME TODAY :)

    by: sam from: HK
    September 14, 2012 6:52 AM
    50cent party out in force,
    Islands 'did' belong to China, just like HK, India and Singapore 'did' belong to Britain, times change, China doesn't own all of the water in Asia nor all the Islands.
    In Response

    by: annie from: China
    September 14, 2012 11:20 AM
    diaoyu island is belong to our China, and so does the HK

    by: Rocky from: Shenzhen
    September 14, 2012 4:39 AM
    i think Both China and Japan must calm down and sit down, to negotiate a better solution for both sides.

    by: Anon from: United States
    September 14, 2012 3:26 AM
    These are Japanese waters and the Senkakus are Japanese Islands as recognized by the United States regarding its commitments in the Mutual Defense Treaty, which have been clarified to cover the Senkakus.. They have been under effective Japanese administrative countrol for more than 100 years. China's 'historical claims' based on control a hundred plus years ago is extremely weak when compared to the situations of all countries around the world. ceding the islands to China based on this would open Pandora's box on 'historical claims'.

    by: Anonymous
    September 14, 2012 2:51 AM
    Both Japan and China are absolutely stupid. It is rather childish and silly that countries fight over land, and ridiculous for such an island like this. I really do not understand why they can't cooperate and share the island.
    In Response

    by: God
    September 14, 2012 11:36 AM
    Japanese wish to start WWIII


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