News / USA

    US Spokeswoman Shrugs Off Attacks from Russian Bloggers, Media

    U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki, shown at far right on April 13, 2014, has faced harsh attacks from Russian state media and bloggers
    U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki, shown at far right on April 13, 2014, has faced harsh attacks from Russian state media and bloggers
    Natasha MozgovayaMike Eckel
    She’s has songs written about her. She’s had Photoshopped images of her go viral. She’s had a verb named in her honor. In some parts of the Russian-language blogosphere, she’s become a minor celebrity.
     
    Not in a good way.
     
    Jen Psaki is the face of the U.S. State Department, seen in daily briefings fielding questions from reporters from around the world, trying to articulate U.S. foreign policy.
     
    She’s also the target of a relentless and unrivaled swirl of derision, mockery and outright insults coming from Russian bloggers, newscasters and state-run media, which operate under the thumb of the Kremlin.
     
    "I take it as a badge of honor,” Psaki told VOA’s Russian Service. “It is funny and entertaining that there has been a lot of time spent dedicated to Photoshopping pictures and different attacks on me over the course of time.”
     
    “I am in a good company: U.S. officials. In fact, many women who are U.S. officials over time who also have been victims of the same Russian propaganda machine, so I take it all in stride,” she said.
     
    That one of the top public officials of the U.S. government is being mocked isn’t new. What’s new is how personalized and vitriolic the attacks are, coming mainly via services such as Twitter and LiveJournal.
     
    The campaign appears to have gotten at least a wink and a nudge, if not imprimatur, from the Kremlin. It also reflects the harsh rhetoric and accusations that have been slung back and forth by Washington and Moscow on the crisis in Ukraine.

    Moscow asserts that the government that took over after Viktor Yanukovych's ouster as president in February was populated by Nazis and radical nationalists, and that Washington was directly backing it. Washington, for its part, has asserted that Moscow is directly funding and managing the insurgency roiling eastern Ukraine.
     
    What is Psaking?

    Dmitry Kiselyov, the man who anchored Russia’s dominant news program on the state-run TV broadcaster before being tapped as the Kremlin’s main propaganda chief, has helped popularized the term "psaking.”
     
    In a recent broadcast, he asserted that: "People say [psaking] when someone makes a dogmatic statement about something they don’t understand, mixes the facts up, and then doesn’t apologize."
     
    Much of the derision has focused on Psaki’s misstatements and slips of tongue, most of which have been minor. For example, at a press briefing April 10, she answered a question about Russian natural gas transport, saying that gas largely flowed from Europe to Ukraine and Russia.
     
    She immediately corrected herself, and her comments were ignored by the majority of the media. Russia bloggers, however, piled on, saying it demonstrated the ignorance of the U.S. government.
     
    The state-run English-language TV channel RT has created a slideshow dedicated to what it has called Psaki’s misstatements. Dmitry Rogozin, a firebrand who was formerly ambassador to NATO and is now a vice prime minister, tweeted that the Psaki press briefing "lacked a laugh track." He followed up with a derisive tweet addressed to Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, saying, "Please tell Lavrov to bring Psaki some textbooks.”
     
    Some bloggers even asserted Psaki had been fired by the State Department for the gaffes, setting up the Twitter hashtag #SavePsaki to sarcastically support her. She was not fired.
     
    Russia’s top diplomat to the United Nations, Vitaly Churkin, offered semi-diplomatic commentary when asked directly by a state TV reporter if he knew her whereabouts.
     
    “I don’t know where Psaki has gone off to,” he told the Rossiya TV reporter, but said he hoped she would "appear again… I’ve always found it very interesting to listen to her.”
     
    History of diplomatic derision

    Psaki isn’t the first U.S. government representative to be on the receiving end of Russian mockery—official or unofficial. Michael McFaul, who was ambassador to Moscow from 2012 to 2014, was stalked by Russian state TV reporters and routinely lambasted on Twitter, LiveJournal and other Russian blog sites.
     
    In the VOA interview, Psaki appeared to suggest that the personal vitriol was being organized or, at least, endorsed by the Kremlin.
     
    "I do think that there is a question that I think those who are involved and are behind these attacks should think about: that is, whether these are the actions of a world superpower, which Russia is," she said.
     
    "Should they be exerting their attention towards these personal, these inaccurate attacks toward me and other United States officials?" she asked. "I think it's pretty clear what's behind this: the disagreement over the Ukraine and our policies on Ukraine."

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Igor
    June 14, 2014 3:14 PM
    She really entertaines Russian people, saying something like "We'll sent the 6th Fleet of the United States to the coasts of Belarus".
    In Response

    by: Andrey Petrov
    June 15, 2014 5:03 AM
    Yeah, that was something. She showed her complete ignorance because Belarus doesn't have any coasts at all.

    by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
    June 14, 2014 12:56 PM
    The article is written hastily and culturally insensitive, as if there wasn’t such a thing as Russian language. The authors don’t know that the pronunciation of name of “Psaki” in Russian and in some Slavonic languages is the HOMONYM of a vulgar word “URINE”. Therefore, it is wrong to suggest that the personal vitriol of Miss Psaki was endorsed by the Kremlin. To the contrary, it was endorsed by the person who appointed Miss Psaki to appear in front of Slavonic nations, who was culturally ignorant with respect to these cultures. I wonder what would be the reaction of an American auditorium if in front of them had appeared “Miss Urine”? Therefore, Russian people have all rights to laugh at the name of "Psaki". By defending the gross incompetence that had been demonstrated by Miss Psaki, the authors of the article encourage unprofessionalism and negligence perpetrated in very responsible job a press-secretary of any high-ranking official is.
    In Response

    by: Goldingen from: Mittawa
    June 15, 2014 1:40 AM
    This coincidence of individual words of different meaning but sounding similarily in various languages is rather often. Thus the word Putana in several countries means " a street-walker" however a close-sounding surname belongs to a quite respectable getleman in another country.

    by: Surena from: Ottawa Ont.
    June 13, 2014 12:44 PM
    I have always found Ms Jen Psaki a professional articulated spokeswoman for US State Dept. I am sure that she is totally ignoring all this mockery campaign orchestrated by a New USSR.
    Bravo Jen !

    by: R from: from Morder with love
    June 13, 2014 9:04 AM
    I love Jen Psaki, she is a worthy person. But Kiselov is TV troll.
    In Response

    by: jpsquaddie from: kosovo
    June 17, 2014 8:48 AM
    Please wake up and research just what that retarded woman says, she lies daily and is an embarrassment to American politics!
    In Response

    by: Paul from: Odessa (Ukraine)
    June 16, 2014 6:08 PM
    Hmm. I like it too. Never thought I'd see such a comment. Correctly Kiselev idiot. :)

    by: Donald Fraser Miles from: Elliot Lake, Canada
    June 13, 2014 8:38 AM
    I've made and have been the recipient of inappropriate remarks on the internet. I think Russia as with all nations should encourage their own national defence departments not to participate in personalized attacks. The functions of government and legitimate political analysis require a degree of protection from maliciousness. I am surprised at how effective a personal level of attack can be in my experience in causing one to withdraw from commentary. It is necessary to continue onwards with good writing or speaking as if the criticisms had not been ever made. One can find strength in literature and philosophy to keep one focused on good writing. I am sure Jen Psaki can do the same and may not be as affected as I sometimes have been by the discourse on the internet.
    In Response

    by: Halard Forkbeard from: Urmala
    June 19, 2014 5:12 AM
    The fact remains that Psaki's last name strikes a funny cord in a Russian ear as it sounds like Ms Urine.

    Unfortunate, but true especially when coupled with her utter lack of understanding of issues involved in the ongoing Russian and Ukrainian situations.

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