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Punk Rock Band Jail Sentences Highlight Russian Split

Pussy Riot Jail Sentences Highlight Russia's Spliti
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August 21, 2012 12:53 AM
Images of the bright balaclavas (masks) of the Pussy Riot protesters in Russia have circled the globe. But how are their anti-Putin protest and convictions in court playing at home? James Brooke talks to Russians in Moscow.

Pussy Riot Jail Sentences Highlight Russia's Split

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MOSCOW — The bright balaclavas of the Russian punk rock band Pussy Riot have circled the globe.  But how are their protests against Russian President Vladimir Putin in a Moscow cathedral and their convictions in court playing at home?  Russians are divided on the band.
 
Conservative nationalists support the two-year sentences handed down on Friday.  Outside the Moscow courthouse, a group of men dressed in Czarist uniforms gathered.  They were from from Miloserdie, or Mercy, a Russian Orthodox charity.
 
“I’m sorry, but Christianity doesn’t always mean the freedom to do whatever you want,” said one man, who declined to give his name.  “Our charity, Miloserdie, will bring them their food parcels.  Don’t worry, we’ll feed them well, but behind bars in prison.”
 
Standing nearby was Liya Smirnova, who runs a Russian Orthodox youth organization.  “The main thing for us, believers of the Russian Orthodox Church, is that this kind of madness doesn’t happen in the church again,” she said.
 
But Russia’s westernized liberals disagree.  A woman named Yana came to the courthouse on Friday wearing the kind of brightly colored ski mask that made the band recognizable around the world. 
 
“I came to support the girls, and not only because they have been locked away all this time, but because the court system is completely awful,” she said.  “I’ve followed how the trial has been going, and it’s completely terrible.  I also support them as activists and artists, if I can say it like that.  I saw their first video, and I really liked it.  And I think they did the right thing.”
 
Alla, another band supporter, whose friend was arrested by riot police on Friday said, “no law exists” in Russia.  “There is no law to have these girls sit in jail.  It’s unlawful.  It’s not possible.  And we are all waiting for, and believe and will continue to believe in, their release.”
 
On Monday, police broke up another Pussy Riot mob in central Moscow. 
 
Authorities are searching for two more women who took part in the band's performance six months ago at Moscow's Christ the Savior Cathedral.
 
Russian billionaire Alexander Lebedev says the band members' trials, and the trial of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, were ordered by the Kremlin.  “I suddenly understood from the Navalny case, which is fully fabricated, same as with these girls, that it’s only politics.  It’s nothing else,” he said in an interview outside the courthouse. 
 
Lebedev, who worked for many years in London, says the solution for Russia is democracy.  “I mean it's already been invented - the parliament, the elections, the free media, the independent court, and the opposition as a permanent and legal and constitutional authority in the country,” he added.
 
But Lebedev will not stay in the country for long.  He says he is selling his Russian investments and moving to London. 

James Brooke

A foreign correspondent who has reported from five continents, Brooke, known universally as Jim, is the Voice of America bureau chief for Russia and former Soviet Union countries. From his base in Moscow, Jim roams Russia and Russia’s southern neighbors.

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by: kunosoura from: U.S.A.
August 21, 2012 8:53 AM
Media driven hysteria. The full episode isn*t shown in US, extreme public vulgarism, driven by religious hatred. Do taxpayers pay for their elected officials to get involved in such trash ? Nothing better to do ? Sleezy electioneering. If it were in U.S. they would be charged with a *hate crime* and given twenty years and national yellow journalism would have dragged it around for almost as long. In U.S. every time farmer Jones* mule pass a bit of gas, flatulemce, the FBI rushes out to investigate; DHS- americas* Gestapo. And Modanna says ! And that gets into world news. Incredulous.


by: jimmy columbus from: USA
August 20, 2012 11:58 PM
WOW...no freedom of speech there?
Scary,............... I don't know if it's Political or Religious ?...
LONG LIVE, PUSSY RIOT!!!


by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
August 20, 2012 9:32 PM
Science teaches that every population can’t be homogenous, but is heterogeneous. So, why shouldn’t Russians be split in the particular case? Those from so called Miloserdie, or Mercy, a Russian Orthodox charity openly support the church’s involvement into violation of basic human rights and Russian Constitution. Their blasphemy is that they claim themselves as “true believers” as they clearly are not. They are blind sheep led by a shepherd who is undisguised KGB/FSB admirer playing a tune from the mediaeval Bible.


by: Bob Caps from: TEXAS
August 20, 2012 4:25 PM
Money is not the root of all evil, apparently music is. Music is now punishable by imprisonment. FREE PR!!


by: .T.Sanford from: Canada
August 20, 2012 3:59 PM
It's quite obvious that Putin is completely out of touch with the realities of the modern world communications. No matter how rude or hysterical the action by the Pussy Riot, which probably merits a 'time served' sentence at the most, the Russians really blew it. Kinda scary though;since there are much more important issues to be addressed.

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