News / Middle East

Putin: Moscow Won't Change Position on Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin, September 5, 2012.
Russian President Vladimir Putin, September 5, 2012.
VOA News
Russian President Vladimir Putin has signaled that Moscow is not ready to shift its stance on supporting Syria, and suggested that Western nations are relying on militant groups like al-Qaida to help topple Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Speaking Thursday on Russia Today television, Putin called this a "dangerous and very shortsighted" policy, but he did not name specific countries.

The Russian leader questioned why Russia should be the one to re-think its policy toward Syria.  He said, "perhaps our negotiating partners should reevaluate their position."

Moscow has maintained that dialogue with the Assad government and opposition activists is necessary for peace.  Moscow has angered the United States and other Western nations by blocking strong sanctions against Syria by the United Nations Security Council.  

Also Thursday, Iraq denied U.S. allegations that it is allowing Iran to fly through its airspace to deliver weapons to Syria.

An Iraqi government spokesman said Baghdad will not allow any government to use its airspace to arm any of the parties in Syria.  Three U.S. senators - Lindsey Graham, Joe Lieberman, and John McCain - told Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Baghdad that such action would damage ties with Washington.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Assad's forces have recaptured a town on the border with Jordan used as a transit point by refugees escaping the war.  The group said hundreds of Syrian soldiers backed by tanks assaulted Tel Chehab early Thursday, arresting dozens of people and setting fire to rebel safehouses.

You May Like

Photogallery Indonesia's Post-Election Surveys to Face Audit

Country's Public Opinion Survey Association will review results of several post-ballot surveys that show dramatically different outcomes More

Video Hotel in Rio Favela Attracts Jazz Enthusiasts

Once a private residence/art studio, turned hotel, The Maze is now the happening tourist spot club in Rio to experience world-renowned jazz More

Rights Group Says Ugandan Court Decision Violates Basic Freedoms

Uganda’s High Court recently ruled in support of its Minister for Ethics and Integrity who closed down a human rights workshop run by LGBT activist; HRW expressed concern for freedom of speech More

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Pakistani Offensive Empties Biggest Town in Militant Sanctuaryi
X
Ayaz Gul
July 11, 2014 4:03 PM
Pakistan's military recently took a group of journalists to Miranshah, North Waziristan, the main city in a region that has been stronghold of militant and terrorist groups. Ayaz Gul brings us a first-person view of the trip to a city that is now empty of residents, but full of evidence of the militants who were once based there.
Video

Video Pakistani Offensive Empties Biggest Town in Militant Sanctuary

Pakistan's military recently took a group of journalists to Miranshah, North Waziristan, the main city in a region that has been stronghold of militant and terrorist groups. Ayaz Gul brings us a first-person view of the trip to a city that is now empty of residents, but full of evidence of the militants who were once based there.
Video

Video Hotel in Rio Favela Attracts Jazz Enthusiasts

You might not expect to find a hotel in one of Rio de Janeiro’s favelas -- the local name for the city's shantytowns. But VOA’s Brian Allen has the unlikely success story of “The Maze.” Though it's located in one of the poorest parts of the city, it has also been named as one of the best places to hear live jazz music in the world.
Video

Video Smart Road 'Talks' to Cars, Warns of Dangers

How would you drive differently if traffic signals could tell you when they were about to turn red? Or, if your car could warn you of a pedestrian crossing the road ahead of you? Researchers are working on these advances on what’s called a “Smart Road” in Virginia. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti puts you in the driver’s seat to show how it’s done.
Video

Video California Dance Company Aims to Break Belly Dance Stereotype

In the United States, and some other countries, belly dancing is often perceived as a seductive dance, performed mostly at specialty restaurants. One California dance company is trying to get more people to appreciate it as form of art. The group Bellydance Evolution is hoping to redefine people's view of belly dancing by fusing western dance styles with belly dancing and performing around the world. Elizabeth Lee reports for VOA from Los Angeles.
Video

Video Restored Papyrus Swamps Can Help Fight Pollution, Conserve Water

Papyrus is a light but strong reed that grows well in shallow, fresh water. The plant stood at the center of the ancient Egyptian civilization. It was used as paper and the reed's shape inspired the fluted columns of ancient Greece. Most of the papyrus swamps gradually disappeared from Egypt and other parts of Africa. As VOA's Faiza Elmasry discovered, though, restoring the papyrus swamps could hold the key to solve many of today’s problems, from pollution to water wars. Faith Lapidus narrates.
Video

Video Virginia Site Tests Drones for FAA Rules

Blacksburg, a college town in southwestern Virginia, is one of six locations chosen by the FAA - the Federal Aviation Administration - to test drones. Researchers are sending feedback to the FAA as the agency develops national drone regulations. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti traveled to the town to check what’s up in the air there.
Video

Video Israel, Hamas Trade Blame, Dig in

The military conflict between Israel and Hamas, the Islamist militant group that rules the Gaza Strip, continues to escalate. As VOA’s Brian Padden reports, both sides blame each other for provoking the conflict and neither side at this point is ready to back down.
Video

Video Burma Football Friendly Brings Together Battlefield Opponents

As most of Myanmar’s ethnic armies maintain a fragile ceasefire with the government, some of the troops were able to let off a little steam, World Cup - style. Steve Sandford reports from Karen State, Myanmar, also known as Burma, on a peace initiative aimed at building trust between the opposing sides of one of the world’s longest-running conflicts.

AppleAndroid