News / Europe

Putin: Russia Sanctions Counterproductive

Russian President Vladimir Putin disparages sanctions while at the International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg, Russia, on May 24, 2014.
Russian President Vladimir Putin disparages sanctions while at the International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg, Russia, on May 24, 2014.
VOA News
Russian President Vladimir Putin said Saturday that sanctions imposed on his country over its involvement in Ukraine were counterproductive and did not correspond to international law.
 
Speaking to a group of Western journalists at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, Putin criticized the West, saying support for an "unconstitutional coup" interrupted a constructive dialogue over Ukraine.
 
Those who instigated the "coup" in Ukraine should have thought more carefully about the consequences of their actions, he said.

Western nations have threatened to toughen sanctions if Russia interferes with Sunday's national elections in Ukraine. Russia's natural gas and oil industries could be targeted, for instance.
 
The U.S. and its European allies first imposed sanctions after Russian lawmakers voted to annex Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula in early March. In early May, U.S. Secretary of State Victoria Nuland said at a congressional hearing that sanctions — focused on people in Putin's inner circle — had affected Russia’s economy, depressing its stock market and its currency’s value. Some members of Congress disagreed that sanctions were making sufficient impact.
 
On Friday, after Putin pledged to forum members that he would respect the outcome of the elections and work with the new government, Russia’s stock index and currency rallied.
 
In Moscow, the MICEX stock index rose 0.6 percent, the Associated Press reported. It also said Russia’s currency, the ruble, ticked up 0.5 percent against the dollar. Trading at 34.1 rubles, it’s the currency’s best performance since Crimea's annexation, the AP said.

Some information for this report comes from AP and Reuters.

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by: Frank Capra from: Ekaterinburg RU
May 26, 2014 11:55 AM
Counter-productive sanctions? Only to the richest mass murderer in Russia and his ability to amass more billions at the expense of his enslaved and oppressed peoples.


by: Anonymous
May 25, 2014 5:39 PM
Putin's Vetoing for the International Criminal Court for investigations into mass murders, and war crimes in Syria are far more counterproductive than anything. He should smarten up instead of aiding and allowing criminal activity implemented by bashar al assad whom should of been arrested years ago for atrocities and many other crimes. This example shows the world Putin is a disgrace to all mankind.


by: Anonymous
May 25, 2014 2:44 AM
We must stop purchasing Russia's gas and oil!!! We must not contribute to the war!


by: Anonymous
May 24, 2014 10:11 PM
It doesn't matter if you are a next door country or across the globe. It is up to that country to decide its own fate by the peoples decision, putin has no business sticking his nose there.

In Response

by: Anonymous
May 25, 2014 5:43 PM
nah it is nobodies business but Ukraine. USA has just as much business defending Ukrainians for a democratic election as Russia does. Doesn't matter if you are next door or around the world. Respecting Ukraine's people is number one here... Russia had no business trying to steal Crimea or chop it up either. It will never be recognized by anyone in the world. Putin has always done idiotic provocative acts, which only digs him deeper, hopefully the Russian people overthrow Putin someday soon. Although Putn would likely do the same thing as assad has done, label all opposition or anyone who dislikes him, as terrorists, which makes them think they can kill everyone.

In Response

by: mpaulson from: Denver
May 24, 2014 10:53 PM
Russia has every right to be involved in the Ukraine crisis. Given both the history of the two countries and the fact that it can and has had an impact on Russia already. The US has no right to be involved in this. It's yet another example of the US gov Taking advantage of a bad situation and trying to buy a government. Just like Iraq, Libya and Syria.


by: amb137 from: Palo Alto
May 24, 2014 9:34 PM
Bloomberg said buy Russian shares depressed by this UA kerrymongering. They were right on the money with the same call when Russia kicked out Georgian 'liberators' from Ossetia, and they are right on the money this time around too. Check RSX.


by: Anonymous
May 24, 2014 9:02 PM
No need to blame Putin because he is not the worst President and when it comes to Ukraine, he has most rights than any country on earth to act against and protect both Russia and Ukraine interests.


by: Pat from: Panama city fl
May 24, 2014 7:05 PM
Sorry Mr. Putin. But accourding to NATO thats the way wars will be fought from now on. We all live on the same unique planet, which may be the only home we all may ever have. There really is no need for weapons any more. Bank accounts emptied can hurt even more so than bullets & bombs. Remenber we are all brothers & sisters and we do this because we love you and your people. God bless.


by: Robert Webb from: Oklahoma City
May 24, 2014 6:28 PM
We, the people of America, as well as our own government need to tend to our own affairs. Too many Americans and others have died mixing into the affairs of others who never appreciate the well intended help. Never in the long term anyway.


by: Guylischnittel
May 24, 2014 6:22 PM
You know what really doesn't correspond to international law?

Sending in para-military Cossacks as a vanguard for an invasion force, holding sham elections, and annexing bits of foreign countries.


by: Craig from: Monterey, CA
May 24, 2014 6:16 PM
If the tactics of sanction are so ineffectual, why mention them? You're a liar, Mr. Putin. This not only stings- it reduces your control by demonstrating your vulnerability to forces of social justice you would prefer to regard as beneath you. Why not just bring your Spetznaz back home and allow the elections to move forwards without (further) interference?

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