News / Asia

Relief Workers in Philippines Struggle to Reach Typhoon Victims

An aerial view of a fishing village in Guiwan town, devastated by super Typhoon Haiyan, in Samar province in central Philippines Nov. 11, 2013.
An aerial view of a fishing village in Guiwan town, devastated by super Typhoon Haiyan, in Samar province in central Philippines Nov. 11, 2013.
Daniel Schearf
As international aid rushes to the typhoon-ravaged Philippines, groups say rescue and relief efforts are being slowed by roadblocks caused by massive amounts of debris. Three days after Typhoon Haiyan came ashore, authorities are still struggling to even gauge the extent of the devastation.  Meanwhile U.S. military transport planes and a contingent of Marines have arrived to help. 
 
Supplies of emergency food, water, and sanitation are being flown in by helicopter to the storm-damaged central Philippines, three days after a record super typhoon.
 
Typhoon Haiyan, known locally as Yolanda, slammed into eastern Leyte and Samar islands on Friday, obliterating everything in its path and cutting off supplies of power and water, as well as crucial road links.
 
U.S. military C-130 planes, filled with relief supplies and Marines, began arriving in Tacloban, the devastated capital of Leyte, on Monday.  
 
Orla Fagan, spokeswoman for the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) in Manila, estimated that nine million people have been affected by the storm, but the extent of damage is still unknown because the rescue effort remains handicapped by debris, downed trees and power lines.
 
"Certainly Tacloban has been hardest hit. But, in the areas where we haven't been able to access, we actually don't know what the damage is. So, we do expect that there will be increased numbers of dead, deaths reported. And we are doing our very best to access the people who are desperately in need at this stage," said Fagan.

  • An aerial image taken from a Philippine Air Force helicopter shows the devastation of the first landfall by typhoon Haiyan in Guiuan, Eastern Samar province, central Philippines, Nov. 11, 2013.
  • Survivors fill the streets as they line up to get supplies in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Nov. 11, 2013.
  • A survivor writes a call for help, Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Nov. 11, 2013.
  • Survivors pass by two large boats that were washed ashore by strong waves caused by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Nov. 10, 2013.
  • A resident walks by remains of houses after powerful Typhoon Haiyan slammed into Tacloban city, Leyte province central Philippines on Nov. 9, 2013
  • Survivors assess the damage after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines, Nov. 9, 2013.
  • Tacloban Airport is covered by debris after powerful Typhoon Haiyan hit Tacloban city, in Leyte province in central Philippines, Nov. 9, 2013.
  • Residents go on their daily business Nov. 9, 2013, following a powerful typhoon that hit Tacloban city, in Leyte province, central Philippines.
  • A fisherman carries his net after making it safely back to shore in the fishing village after a strong winds from Typhoon Haiyan battered Bayog town in Los Banos, Laguna city, south of Manila, Nov. 8, 2013. 
  • A man walks past a tree uprooted by strong winds brought by super Typhoon Haiyan that hit Cebu city, central Philippines, Nov. 8, 2013. 
  • A mother takes refuge with her children as Typhoon Haiyan hits Cebu city, central Philippines, Nov. 8, 2013.

The international community responded quickly with offers of emergency help.
 
Fagan said that donations and commitments are coming in from Australia, European countries, Turkey, and North America. She said that aside from food and water, one of the biggest concerns is shelter; the Philippines is still in the midst of its rainy season.
 
"The International Organization for Migration committed 4,000 tarpaulins, the United States has airlifted plastic sheeting for 10,000 households, and that will arrive in the next 24 to 48 hours. The UK rapid response of 5 million pounds, about $8 million U.S. dollars, for 15,000 shelter kits, the Catholic Relief Services have mobilized 18,000 tarpaulins. France has airlifted plastic sheeting and non-food items, and Habitat for Humanity is collaborating with the government to distribute 30,000 tarpaulins," said Fagan.
 
Within Asia, Japan and Singapore were sending medical and rescue teams. China, which has had tense relations with Manila in recent years because of their territorial dispute in the South China Sea, said it is pledging humanitarian aid, including a $100,000 cash donation.
 
The Association of Southeast Asian Nations has dispatched an assessment team to the area to discuss possible relief support.
 
Typhoon Haiyan weakened significantly before reaching Vietnam on Sunday.
 
Francis Markus, a spokesman for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent said from Hanoi that Haiyan is one of a series of destructive storms to hit Vietnam in the last few weeks. Thousands of people are still struggling to recover.
 
"In Vietnam, we are already appealing for emergency help for those people who were hit by the earlier typhoons and we are trying to increase the amount of support as the storms have compounded each other. And, we will have to really assess the situation as far as this latest storm and how much damage it has added. But, really, there is continuing concern and continuing need to help people regain their resilience after a very, very difficult few weeks in Vietnam," said Markus.
 
International aid workers have said that countries that suffer frequent natural disasters need to invest more in preparedness and development to help people become more resilient.
 
Typhoon Haiyan cut power for two days on the Philippines island of Bohol, which is still recovering from a magnitude 7.2 earthquake which struck last month and killed over 200 people.

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by: Mark from: Michigan, USA
November 11, 2013 8:31 PM
A heartbreaking human tragedy. This is a perfect opportunity for the US and China to cooperate and build trust. This area is within a zone that the Chinese wish to increase their influence and this a great opportunity for an emerging power to demonstrate it is ready to help out. Please work together and help these folks in Asia to have the best possible outcome from a terrible situation. I am an American worker donating my weeks worth of wages to get some food and shelter to the survivors and my heart goes out to each of their families. Let us use this terrible, terrible situation to build trust between our countries and achieve the best possible outcome from what is a terrible situation in the region. Let's work together for the good of the HUMAN RACE. Best wishes to the people effected and I will do my modest personal best to add to your relief. I hope others will as well. Our sympathy and aid is with you. "Hang in there"

In Response

by: Diana Rose from: Eastern Samar Philippines
November 12, 2013 12:39 AM
Thank you so much Mr Mark of Michigan! I appreciate your kindness! God Bless you and all the people who are willing to help us in this time of disaster!


by: Marilyn from: Westbrook maine
November 11, 2013 4:44 PM
Thank you so much to the US government for sending melitary over to help victims ..

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