News / USA

    Obama: Priority is Rolling Back Islamic State Gains in Iraq

    Obama: No Strategy Yet on Islamic State Threati
    X
    August 29, 2014 2:09 AM
    President Barack Obama says he has no strategy yet on how to defeat Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria and will send Secretary of State John Kerry to the region to build a coalition. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
    Watch related video report from VOA's Luis Ramirez.
    VOA News

    U.S. President Barack Obama says his priority is rolling back the gains the Islamic State has made in Iraq.

    The president spoke to reporters at the White House Thursday, moments before meeting with his national security team on the crises in Iraq and Syria.

    Obama said the United States is continuing with its targeted strikes on Islamic State targets in Iraq, saying such actions have caused it to lose arms and equipment.

    The president, however, said beyond that, he does not have a strategy yet in dealing with the militants, countering speculation that airstrikes on Islamic State targets in Syria may be imminent.

    The president said Islamic State has found a haven in Syria and that Syrian forces cannot get in areas under its control.

    He said outsiders have to stop backing Islamic State and that others in the region have to recognize the threat the militants pose to them.

    Obama last week authorized air surveillance on Islamic State militants in Syria.

    Syria said this week it would welcome U.S. and British help in fighting the militants, but only in coordination with Damascus.  It says a unilateral U.S. attack would violate its airspace and could lead to an attempt to shoot down American warplanes.

    U.S. officials say they would not first consult Syria, saying President Bashar al-Assad has lost the authority to lead.

    The White House gave no information on Obama's meeting with his national security team Thursday other than to say there will be more meetings in the coming days.

    Meanwhile, The Washington Post newspaper reports that at least four Western hostages held by the Islamic State in Syria were waterboarded.

    The paper said they included James Foley, the American journalist who was beheaded by an Islamic State militant.

    The Post cited people with firsthand (direct) knowledge of what happened to the hostages.

    Waterboarding is a form of torture that simulates drowning. The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency used the interrogation method on terror suspects arrested after the September 11 attacks in 2001.

    Second American killed fighting for IS

    Meanwhile, a Somali-American man is reported to be the second U.S. national killed while fighting alongside militants in Syria.

    TV station KSMP in Minneapolis, Minnesota, has identified the man as Abdirahman Muhumed, who left the area to fight for the Islamic State group, also known as IS.

    According to its sources, the station said Muhumed died in the same battle as Douglas McCain, 33, also from the Minneapolis area. His death this weekend in Syria was confirmed by the U.S. National Security Council earlier this week.

    The two men apparently knew each other.  

    In its coverage of McCain's death, Minnesota Public Radio had reported that his Facebook page indicated he knew Muhumed, "a Minneapolis man who went to Syria and joined the Islamic State."

    Muhumed had posted a photo of himself holding a rifle and a Qur'an, eliciting negative responses from Facebook "friends," MPR said. But McCain, in a Feb. 19 post, encouraged Muhumed to "continue protecting our brothers and sisters."

    Minneapolis, in the northern state of Minnesota, is home to a large Somali-American community. More than a dozen young men have left the community to fight in Syria, drawn by Islamic radicalism.

    The FBI already was investigating the death of McCain, who had been on a watch list given his overseas travel and the content of his social media posts. The bureau's field office in Minneapolis for almost a decade has looked into the cases of several young Somali-Americans joining the terrorist group al-Shabab in Somalia.

    E.K. Wilson, spokesman for the field office, told The Associated Press: "We have done extensive outreach recently, as we have the last seven years, but we've had a concerted effort ... over the last few months" involving travel to Syria.

    Reports of a second American killed in Syria began circulating on social media sites Wednesday. The council said late in the day it was aware of the reports, but was not in a position at the time to say whether they were true.

    Mother pleads for son's life

    Meanwhile, the mother of an American journalist being held by Islamic State militants has pleaded with the group's leader to let her son, Steven Sotloff, go free.

    In a video released Wednesday, Shirley Sotloff said he is an "honorable man" who should not be punished for U.S. government actions.

    "I've learned that Islam teaches that no individual should be held responsible for the sins of others," she said. "Steven has no control over the actions of the U.S. government. He is an innocent journalist. I've also learned that you, the Caliph, can grant amnesty. I ask you to please release my child."

    The IS group beheaded American journalist James Foley earlier this month and is threatening to kill Sotloff if the United States does not stop carrying out airstrikes on militants in Iraq.

    White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Obama administration officials have been in contact with the Sotloff family, but he did not give specifics on what advice the family was given on the "wisdom" of releasing the video.

    "As you know, this administration is deeply engaged and doing everything we can to seek the return of every American who is currently being held in that region," Earnest said.

    Journalist released

    Peter Theo Curtis reads a statement to reporters outside his mother's home in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 27, 2014.Peter Theo Curtis reads a statement to reporters outside his mother's home in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 27, 2014.
    x
    Peter Theo Curtis reads a statement to reporters outside his mother's home in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 27, 2014.
    Peter Theo Curtis reads a statement to reporters outside his mother's home in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 27, 2014.

    Also Wednesday, Peter Theo Curtis, another American journalist who had been held hostage by Syrian militants for two years, said he was "overwhelmed with emotion" after learning how many people across the world had worked for his release.

    Curtis also expressed gratitude for the many people who have welcomed him back to the United States since his return this week.

     

    You May Like

    Video Democrats Clinton, Kaine Offer 'Very Different Vision' Than Trump

    In a jab at Trump, Clinton says her team wants to 'build bridges, not walls'; Obama Hails Kaine's record; Trump calls Kaine a 'job-killer'

    Turkey Wants Pakistan to Close Down institutions, Businesses Linked to Gulen

    Thousands of Pakistani students are enrolled in Gulen's commercial network of around two dozen institutions operating in Pakistan for over two decades

    AU Passport A Work in Progress

    Who will get the passport and what the benefits are still need to be worked out

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Not Again from: Canada
    August 28, 2014 9:55 PM
    Pres says...."he does not have a strategy yet in dealing..." no question that an overall strategy will depend on the coalition, of local forces/their capabilities/commitment, that Iraq can organize and deploy; and also on the negative outcome for IS from the loss of mobility under the current operation to destroy all that moves, including the terrorists = if it moves, and it is IS, destroy it.
    In the best case scenario, the US will only need to continue degrading IS' capabilities from the air, preferably using UAVs. taking out targets of opportunity- the curent UAVs need to be complemented with new UAVs, so they have the capability of using a rifled approach. The current shotgun approach can cause lots of collateral casualties.
    In the more engaged strategy/ituation the US will not need to go beyond using a few squadrons of B-52s to destroy large facilities that IS has, like large petrochemical facilities that provide significant resources to IS, and lines of communications. If coalitions can't be formed, the US will need to undertake the training of local forces and will need to lead local forces, like the Northern Alliance model, until such time as they gain enough experience to confidently deal with the destruction of IS.
    From a political perspective, the Iraqi gvmt must take the lead in establishing clear confidence building measures to ensure it regains the alligance of the various tribal leaders and the various political representatives of the Sunni, Kurdish, Shia, and other minorities in Iraq. Much of the US strategy will depend on how well the Iraqi gvmt, can regain the trust of the constituent people of Iraq.
    As far as IS is concerned, more needs to be done to gain information, intelligence, and even insider help; from media reports, many if not most of the global Jihadis are using the internet; this media can produce results by using the usual atractants, money, notoriaty, acceptance, etc; as usual the young are followers of trends.
    As far as the seniors of IS, the usual destabilizing/mistrust building measures should work, as it has with other organized crime enterprises, again money, bank accounts, distrust, etc...; start communicating, using any recognizable characteristics names/associates in their previous lives..... At the end of the day, IS is just another, more fanatical, criminal organization, that needs to be put out of business.
    In Response

    by: William li from: Canada
    August 29, 2014 9:01 AM
    Funny you say so. But you forget IS is an American dog! America feed it in Syria, support weapons to it. America may slap its dog for punishment, but kill it's own dog? Forget it! And no one else except America is allowed to touch IS!

    by: tom from: Texas
    August 28, 2014 9:14 PM
    Mr. President we have called our our friends, allies and partners in Europe, Africa, and the Near East looking to build a coalition to fight these head choppers before they reach our shores but no one will answer our calls. - Flunky

    by: Lisa from: Dallas
    August 28, 2014 8:43 PM
    For every body who hate American, your evil don't about American first look at your own countrys problem. Russian

    by: Igor from: Russia
    August 28, 2014 12:39 PM
    Obama cannot control his citizens and cannot prevent them from becoming terrorists, let alone winning the war with IS militants.
    In Response

    by: black
    August 28, 2014 5:20 PM
    That's the whole point of democracy. Everyone's free to choose the path he or she wants to take. Unfortunately, becoming a terrorist may get you killed. Thank god the US is nothing like Russia. Putin is basically a dictator. Pussy Riot anyone?

    by: william li from: canada
    August 28, 2014 12:28 PM
    american government wouldnt care less about your death!

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    In State of Emergency, Turkey’s Erdogan Focuses on Spiritual Movementi
    X
    July 22, 2016 11:49 AM
    The state of emergency that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has declared is giving him even more power to expand a purge that has seen an estimated 60,000 people either arrested or suspended from their jobs. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports from Istanbul.
    Video

    Video In State of Emergency, Turkey’s Erdogan Focuses on Spiritual Movement

    The state of emergency that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has declared is giving him even more power to expand a purge that has seen an estimated 60,000 people either arrested or suspended from their jobs. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports from Istanbul.
    Video

    Video Scientists in Poland Race to Save Honeybees

    Honeybees are in danger worldwide. Causes of what's known as colony collapse disorder range from pesticides and loss of habitat to infections. But scientists in Poland say they are on track to finding a cure for one of the diseases. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Wall Already Runs Along Parts of US-Mexico Border

    The Republican Party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump, gained the support of many voters by saying he would build a wall to keep undocumented immigrants and drugs from coming across the border from Mexico. Critics have called his idea impractical and offensive to Mexico, while supporters say such a bold approach is needed to control the border. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from the border town of Nogales, Arizona.
    Video

    Video New HIV Tests Emphasize Rapid Results

    As the global fight against AIDS intensifies, activists have placed increasing importance on getting people to know their HIV status. Some companies are developing new HIV testing methods designed to be quick, easy and accurate. Thuso Khumalo looks at the latest methods, presented at the International AIDS conference in Durban, South Africa.
    Video

    Video African Youth with HIV Urge More Support

    HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is the top killer of teens in sub-Saharan Africa. But many youths say their experience with the virus is unique and needs to be addressed differently than the adult epidemic. VOA South African Correspondent Anita Powell reports.
    Video

    Video Poor Residents in Cleveland Not Feeling High Hopes of Republican Convention

    With the Republican Party's National Convention underway in Cleveland, Ohio, delegates and visitors are gathered in the host city's downtown - waiting to hear from the party's presidential candidate, Donald Trump. But a few kilometers from the convention's venue, Cleveland's poorest residents are not convinced Trump or his policies will make a difference in their lives. VOA's Ramon Taylor spoke with some of these residents as well as some of the Republican delegates and filed this report.
    Video

    Video Pop-Up Art Comes to Your Living Room, Backyard and Elsewhere

    Around the world, independent artists and musicians wrestle with a common problem: where to exhibit or perform? Traditional spaces such as museums and galleries are reserved for bigger names, and renting a space is not feasible for many. Enter ArtsUp, which connects artists with venue owners. Whether it’s a living room, restaurant, office or even a boat, pop-up events are bringing music and art to unexpected places. Tina Trinh has more.
    Video

    Video With Yosemite as Backdrop, Obama Praises National Parks

    Last month, President Barack Obama and his family visited some of the most beautiful national parks in the U.S. Using the majestic backdrop of a towering waterfall in California's Yosemite National Park, Obama praised the national park system which celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. He talked about the importance of America’s “national treasures” and the need to protect them from climate change and other threats. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
    Video

    Video Counter-Islamic State Coalition Plots Next Steps

    As momentum shifts against Islamic State in Iraq, discussions are taking place about the next steps for driving the terrorist group from its final strongholds. Secretary of State John Kerry is hosting a counter-IS meeting at the State Department, a day after defense ministers from more than 30 countries reviewed and agreed upon a course of action. VOA Pentagon correspondent Carla Babb reports.
    Video

    Video Russia's Participation at Brazil Olympic Games Still In Question

    The International Olympic Committee has delayed a decision on whether to ban all Russian teams from competing in next month's Olympic Games in Brazil over allegations of an elaborate doping scheme. The World Anti-Doping Agency recently released an independent report alleging widespread doping by Russian athletes at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. So far, only Russian track and field athletes have been barred from the Summer Games in Brazil. VOA's Zlatica Hoke has more.
    Video

    Video Scotland’s Booming Whisky Industry Fears Brexit Hangover

    After Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, Scotland’s government wants to break away from the United Kingdom – fearing the nation’s exports are at risk. Among the biggest of these is whisky. Henry Ridgwell reports on a time of turmoil for those involved in the ancient art of distilling Scotland’s most famous product.
    Video

    Video Millennials Could Determine Who Wins Race to White House

    With only four months to go until Americans elect a new president, one group of voters is getting a lot more attention these days: those ages 18 to 35, a generation known as millennials. It’s a demographic that some analysts say could have the power to decide the 2016 election. But a lot depends on whether they actually turn out to vote. VOA’s Alexa Lamanna reports.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora