News / Health

Report Shows Big Drop in New HIV Infections

Ugandan HIV/AIDS patients listen as a doctor explains how to start anti-retroviral treatment, near Kampala, Sept. 1, 2005.Ugandan HIV/AIDS patients listen as a doctor explains how to start anti-retroviral treatment, near Kampala, Sept. 1, 2005.
x
Ugandan HIV/AIDS patients listen as a doctor explains how to start anti-retroviral treatment, near Kampala, Sept. 1, 2005.
Ugandan HIV/AIDS patients listen as a doctor explains how to start anti-retroviral treatment, near Kampala, Sept. 1, 2005.
Lisa Schlein
— A new report from UNAIDS indicates that the rate of new HIV infections has dropped significantly over the past decade. The report estimated 2.3 million adults and children were newly infected with HIV in 2012, a figure that represents a 33 percent reduction in annual new cases compared to 2001. 
 
The report says the most striking results in combating HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, are to be found among children, for which the number of new HIV infections has been cut by 52 percent since 2001. 
 
Mahesh Mahalingam is the Director of the Office of the Deputy Executive Director of UNAIDS.  He said a major element of this progress is that many more pregnant women who are living with HIV are receiving medication that prevents transmission of the disease from mother to child. 
 
“Nearly 62 percent of women who are pregnant and have HIV have received anti-retroviral medicine.  As a result, the number of children becoming infected with HIV has dropped to record low levels from nearly half a million just about 10 years ago.  Now only about 260,000 children were infected with HIV.  We hope that by 2015, we can bring this number down to virtually zero,” said Mahalingam. 
 
The report notes that some 9.7 million people in low and middle-income countries were accessing antiretroviral therapy by the end of 2012, an increase of nearly 20 percent in just one year. The report’s authors say this dramatic acceleration makes them optimistic that the Millennium Development Goal of having 15 million people on HIV treatment will be reached by the 2015 target date.
 
In 2012, the report found an estimated 35.3 million people globally were living with HIV and 1.6 million had died from AIDS-related illnesses. Sub-Saharan Africa remains the most heavily infected region in the world. 
 
It says most new HIV infections have occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa, while the continent as a whole accounts for nearly 75 percent of all people living with HIV in the world.  Mahalingam points out that government leadership combined with community action is succeeding in turning the epidemic around in some places.
 
“The most amount of progress is happening in the country that has the largest number of people living with HIV in the world, and that is South Africa.  In South Africa, record numbers of people have been put on antiretroviral therapy and… about 50 percent decline in new infections have occurred in that country,” he said. 
 
The study found rises in new HIV infections in Eastern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa.  It says Ukraine is making progress in combating the disease, but elsewhere in Eastern Europe drug-injecting users are fueling the epidemic.
 
It says most new HIV infections in developed, Western countries are occurring among gay men.  It says people in the United States and Europe view AIDS as a chronic disease, one which can be treated with medication.  As a consequence, the report says many people are becoming complacent and are no longer taking preventive measures.
 
UNAIDS says punitive laws that criminalize sexual behavior, in addition to stigma and discrimination, prevent people from coming forward to learn their HIV status and get treatment.  It warns that this has the effect of driving the disease underground and worsening the epidemic.

You May Like

Diplomats Work to Extend Arab-Israeli Cease-Fire

Top officials from the US, France, Britain, Germany, Italy, Turkey and Qatar gather in Paris, while Israel security forces continue searching for tunnels used by militants and Gazan rescue workers search for bodies More

Photogallery US Defense Department Warns of Arms to Eastern Ukraine

‘Imminent’ delivery of Russian rocket launcher poses threat to civilians, US says More

Video Researchers: Africa Genetically Modified Crops Held Back by Scaremongering

GM crops offer best hope of increasing productivity and coping with climate change in Africa, according to co-author of Chatham House report More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Babu G. Ranganathan
September 24, 2013 11:39 AM
PREVENTION AND HEALING OF DISEASE: Numerous scientific studies at universities and colleges have shown that the Aloe vera plant contains a myriad of nutrients (i.e. various vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, amino acids) which all together help prevent various diseases and to heal disease.

Read my popular Internet article, CHEMOTHERAPY SUCCESS WITH ALOE VERA! This is a must read article for all those diagnosed with cancer or who have a loved one who is. Just google the title to access the article. There are properties in aloe vera that greatly strengthen the immune system and help protect the immune system and healthy cells from being destroyed by chemo and radiation. The result is that the cancer cells are destroyed while the immune system and more of the healthy cells survive. The properties in aloe vera also help chemo/radiation patients suffer a lot less side effects from the chemo/radiation treatments. Numerous scientific studies at universities and colleges have shown that the Aloe vera plant contains a myriad of nutrients to help prevent various diseases and to heal disease. Babu G. Ranganathan (B.A. Bible/Biology)

THE BEST WEAPON AGAINST GERMS OF ALL KINDS is colloidal silver. Germs, including viruses of all types, cannot develop resistance to colloidal silver. Please read my Internet article, PROTECT YOUR BODY WITH COLLOIDAL SILVER. Just google the title to access the article.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Astronauts Train in Underwater Labi
X
George Putic
July 25, 2014 7:25 PM
In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Not Even Monks Spared From Thailand’s Junta-Backed Morality Push

With Thailand’s military government firmly in control after May’s bloodless coup, authorities are carrying out plans they say are aimed at restoring discipline, morality and patriotism to all Thais. The measures include a crackdown on illegal gambling, education reforms to promote students’ moral development, and a new 24-hour phone hotline for citizens to report misbehaving monks. Steve Sandford reports from Bangkok.
Video

Video Virtual Program Teaches Farming Skills

In a fast-changing world beset by unpredictable climate conditions, farmers cannot afford to ignore new technology. Researchers in Australia are developing an online virtual world program to share information about climate change and more sustainable farming techniques for sugar cane growers. As VOA's Zlatica Hoke reports, the idea is to create a wider support network for farmers.
Video

Video Airline Expert: Missile will Show Signature on Debris

The debris field from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is spread over a 21-kilometer radius in eastern Ukraine. It is expected to take investigators months to sort through the airplane pieces to learn about the missile that brought down the jetliner and who fired it. VOAs Carolyn Presutti explains how this work will be done.
Video

Video Treatment for Childhood Epilepsy Heats up Medical Marijuana Debate

In the United States, marijuana is classed as an illegal drug by the federal government. But nearly half the states have legalized it, to some degree. Proponents say some strains of marijuana might have exceptional health benefits, for treating pain or inflammation in chronic conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Shelley Schlender reports on a strain of medical marijuana developed in Colorado that is reputed to reduce seizures in childhood epilepsy
Video

Video Airbus Adds Metal 3D Printed Parts to New Jets

By the end of this year, European aircraft manufacturing consortium Airbus plans to deliver the first of its new, extra-wide-body passenger jets, the A350-XWB. Among other technological innovations, the new plane will also incorporate metal parts made in a 3-D printer. VOA's George Putic has more.
Video

Video AIDS Conference Welcomes Exciting Developments in HIV Treatment, Prevention

Significant strides have been made in recent years toward the treatment and prevention of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This year, at the International AIDS Conference, the AIDS community welcomed progress on a new pill that may prevent transmission of the deadly virus. VOA’s Anita Powell reports from Melbourne, Australia.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

AppleAndroid